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Full text of "Sponsor"

UNIV OF MD COLLEGE PARK 




NATIONAL uPANY, INC 

GE 
10 ROCKf A' YORK, N, Y 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor55sponno2 




PLAZA 



magazine radio and 1 advertisers use 



'ti> JULY 1955 



F '9* per copy •'S per year 



Vhy this Tremendous Growth in the Use of Spot TV? 



: .no 



1.750 



I 500 




I 000 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



1954 



1955 



Number of Advertisers Using Spot Television, 1st Quarter of each year (Rorabaugh) 



MOST advertising media have nice gradual 
growth patterns. But not Spot Television. 
It took off like a rocket, has been spurting by 
loaps and bounds ever since. For good reason : 
The history of the Spot TV advertiser is that. 
onee he has tested the medium, he expands his 
use of it, and does his best to keep the profitable 
results under wraps. When he tries it, the ad- 
vertiser who has yet to experience the power of 
this medium will find it has the following 
characteristics: 

I- Flexibility— in expenditure per market, 

choice of station, market, time periods, and 

programming, and in contract requirements. 

2. Adaptability-with Spot TV you can take 



full advantage of the wide variance in re- 
gional viewing habits to reach the aud 
types you want under the conditions you 
want. 

3. Merchandisability-Spot Television is a 
favorite advertising medium of the district 
manager, the wholesaler, and retailers in 
ev,ry field. And TV station management 
follow-through with these groups helps 
make a campaign doubly effective. 
To the ad tted in the «h. 

Congratulations on picking a winner. 
To the eel/- <>»<•.< who'll push the line even hiir 

We look forward to telling you the full story of 

Spot Television and helping you make it work. 



Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES • DETROIT • ST LOUIS • SAN FRANCISCO • ATLANTA 



9 th 

FALL FACTS 

BASICS 

TOP ARTICLES 



Including for firit time lpot 
expenditures of top advertisers 
and these six mo|or sections: 



SCCTIOI 

I 

SETIOI 

2 



ii i i \ i-m»\ 

SPOT NETWORK 

PAGE 64* PACE 86* 

i 

I I 1 I \ l-M>\ BAS!< - 

STARTS PACE I 13 



3 



Fii m i»\»n 9 

START* PAGE 133 



4 RADIO 
SPOT NETWORK 
PAGE 134* J PAGE 170: 



ICCTION 

5 

■Bcnoi 

6 



IMIHI) lt\M< - 

STARTS PAGE 163 



I 1 Ml B1 MM. BASK 3 

STARTS PAGE 208 



predictions 



apfx-. 



Ye Qfa&A FIRST ' Sfedvrtt&n Qfa/u 



€we€m 




CHANNEL 6 -RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



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MAXIMUM POWER 



100,000 WATTS 



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-RlCHAtONEffiP 

\v — 1 
HAVENS & MARTININC 




t he souths first television "station 




MAXIMUM HEIGHT 



1,049 FEET 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY BLAIR TV INC. 







~1 



89 ° of stations 
want tv set count 



Color facil- 
ities growing 



ABC plan for 
night radio 



Storer has big 
spot sales team 



NBC TV's "comic 
stable" plans 



Less animation, 
more "live" 



Special "Fall Facts Basics" survey of all U.S. tv ou' up 

fact that broadcasters consider market-by-market tv Bet count one of 
industry's most pressing needs. Survey showed: 44% of statio:. 
sider project "urgent" ; 45% consider it "important"; and only 11 
consider it "unnecessary" project. See page 68 for de' . . 

-SR- 

Same study also shows latest growth of tv color facilit. ,ng tv 
stations. Equipped now for network color: 62%; by the end of 1955: 
an additional 13%. Equipped for color film now: 17%; by the end of 
1955: an additional 10%. Local color facilities lag behind; som- 
of stations are equipped for local color telecasts. By the end of 
'55: 2% more. For more on study, see page 70. 

-SR- 

"Saturation radio" is gaining firm foothold at network level. 
Radio has unveiled new sales plan whereby 28 5-minute periods in 
week night schedule will be sold to advertisers in groups of 10, 15, 
20 or 25. It's not participation plan. Price per segment (in lots 
of 10 shows) starts at $750. There are no additional discounts, no 
limit to length of schedule. ABC claims plan is more than twice as 
efficient as magazines in reaching households, more than 4 times tv. 

-SR- 

Reorganization, expansion of national sales force gives Storer S* - 
tions biggest such unit in spot field. Group has regular nation 
reps (Katz, Blair, NBC Spot Sales) but also has key sales executives 
in New York, Chicago, San Francisco. Team is headed by v. p. and 
National Sales Director Tom Harker, National Sales Manager Bob Wood 
(N.Y.). Gayle Grubb heads San Francisco office. Lew Johnson, Paul 
Evans manage Chicago branch. 

-SR- 

New NBC TV "countrywide search for promising new, young comedians" 
accomplishes 3 things: (1) keeps active reserve of comedy talent to 
replace those network-packaged comedy shows whose ratings are sag- 
ging; (2) keeps talented newcomers out of reach of CBS and ABC tv 
webs; (3) builds another hedge against "fee tv" by developing new 
program formats. NBC TV also has parallel program to uncover new 
comedy writing talent. Plans are under direction of program de- 
velopment chief Leonard Hole. 

-SR- 

Big rush into animated cartoon commercials in wake of upped Screen 
Actor's Guild union scales in 1953 has been slowing noticeably, film 
producers report. Sponsors have learned it's hard to find sub- 
stitute for effective personal demonstration by "live" personality. 
Day of "big cast" commercials is over; they've too expensive. Trend 
is to fewer, and better, film commercial personalities. 



SPONSOR. Volume 9. N'o. 14. 11 .Tulv 10" Published biweekly bv BPONSOB P ' F^tecullTe. Editor^ --tiUUoo Ofllcw. 40 E. 49th Bl 

York 17. Printed it 3110 Elm Are.. Baltimore. Mil S< t year in I'S !9 elsewhere. Entered ai second claai matter 29 Jan 1949 a: Baltimore poBteOr* under Act of t Mir. lfTt 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 11 July 1955 



Web radio 
rates watched 



Farm tv level 
rising fast 



Syndicators 
get voice 



'Co inside" for 
tv commercials 



More Negro, 
Spanish radio 



Nielsen measur- 
ing British tv 



Nestle looks 
at ad results 



Admen are examining recent trend to single rate among radio webs to 
see actual effect on costs. It's final cost rather than single rate 
which is important. CBS Radio's new rate card, now being worked out 
in detail, will have slight effect on costs, other than 5% increase 
in weekend rates. However, new MBS card provides cost reductions at 
night of from 10 to 30%. NBC Radio is being watched carefully; it 
is reexamining entire rate structure. 

-SR- 
Level of tv saturation on U.S. farms is rising more rapidly than is 
national tv saturation, SPONSOR "Fall Facts" checkup among networks, 
independent researchers shows. Since a year ago, percent of farms 
with tv receivers has shot up 21% ; today, about half of all farms 
can be reached with tv. Farm program tastes run close to those of 
urban cousins, but with less interest in sports events and more 
interest in special "farm news" and marketing programs. 

-SR- 
Long-awaited tv film distributors association, now being mapped out, 
will provide syndicators with official voice, for first time. Steer- 
ing committee is working up details for charter, rules of procedure, 
budget. Heading committee is Dwight Martin, General Teleradio, with 
the following aiding him: Ralph Cohn, Screen Gems; Frank Reel, Ziv ; 
Lou Friedland, MCA; Jay Williams, Official; Ned Koenig, Roach; Saul 
Konkis, Studio Films; Dave Savage, Guild. 

-SR- 
Tv commercials can be more effective, researcher Horace Schwerin 
feels, if camera is taken "inside" product or area in which product 
works. In case of 2 rival drug products, one commercial showed 
static "medical chart" of human system; in other, similar chart was 
used but with animation to show how remedy worked. Rembrance was 
twice as high for second commercial. In case of packaged meat 
product only 3% of audience remembered point of "choice center cuts" 
orally; 48% remembered when drawing of steer was animated. 

-SR- 
Two most talked-about radio specialties among timebuyers, reps are 
Negro-appeal radio and Mexican-American radio, "Fall Facts" checkup 
by SPONSOR found. There are now some 600 stations airing Negro 
shows, about 140 with Spanish language. Newest trend: many inde- 
pendent outlets are easing out of other language programing (Polish, 
Italian, French, German) and are substituting Negro or Spanish radio 
stanzas. List of advertisers buying includes most of blue-chips. 

-SR- 
British admen have been receiving briefings this month from Nielsen 
executives (including Art Nielsen himself) concerning latest 
applications of tv audience research data to marketing problems. 
Nielsen's British branch is now measuring viewing in London area, 
using Audimeters (for minute by-miiute data) and Recordimeter-diary 
combination (for cumulative audiences, composition, etc.). Some 600 
homes are in London sample. British NTI reports will be similar to 
those produced by Nielsen covering U.S. viewing. 

--SR- 
Correlation between ad expenditures and results is getting hard look 
from Nestle, which has had tremendous growth in advertising dollars. 
Faith in advertising-results correlations is rare among national 
advertisers, SPONSOR found during All-Media Evaluation Study. 



SPONSOR 





316,000 WATTS 



WGAL-TV 



NBC CBS DuMont 

And, it's the advertising story of the year. 
Here are more than three million people 
with $5Vi billion to spend. And one station 
— WGAL-TV — reaches this vast audience 
for you. No time to waste — start your 
product success story in this market now. 

STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 



LANCASTER, PA. 

Channel 8 Mighty Market Place 



Representatives: 



MEEKER TV, INC. 

New York • Los Anqeles • Chicago • San Francisco 



Harrisburg 


Reading 


York 


Lebanon 


Hanover 


Pottsville 


Gettysburg 


Haileton 


Chambersburg 


Shomokm 


Waynesboro 


Mount Cormel 


Frederick 


Bloomsburg 


Westminster 


Lewisburg 


Carlisle 


Lewlsfown 


Sunbury 


Lock Haven 


Martinsburg 


Hagerstown 



11 JULY 1955 




advertisers use 




ARTICLES 



The top tv and radio trends this fall 

Culled from the 304 pages of the Fall Facts Basics issue, here are the most 
important trends for fall radio and television in digest form 

" fly advice on fall buying" — network heads 

The heads of television and radio networks tell admen what they regard as 
best buys for fall and which developments are most important to watch 

Spot tv and radio budgets of major advertisers 

For the first time, SPONSOR has compiled 1954 spot tv and radio dollar 
expenditures of major advertisers, prints them side by side with spending in 
four other major media (network tv and radio, newspapers, magazines) 



44 



46 



49 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS 

40 EAST 49TH _. 
AGENCY AD LIBS 



6 
10 
16 



NEW & RENEW 23 

MR. SPONSOR, Roger M. Greene 28 

SPONSOR BACKSTAGE 30 

AGENCY PROFILE, T. J. Grunewold 34 

TOP 20 FILMS _ 36 

NEW TV STATIONS 40 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 304 



"My advice on fall timebuying 3 " — rep executives 

SPONSOR offers the thinking of 16 executives of station representative firms 
who give tips on fall buying for radio and television advertisers 



I 'his is local programing 1955 

You'll see where local television and radio programing is headed as you study 
these charts drawn from SPONSOR'S "Buyers' Guide to Station Programing" 



Hon- B&M set about testing tv 

Reported exclusively in SPONSOR for ihe past six months has been the unique 
Burnham & Morrill test of television using a small market where sales were 
low and adding only television as a new factor in marketing 

Timebuyers and their accounts 

List of New York agency timebuyers gives accounts of each buyer. Chicago, 
West Coast and other area buyers will be listed next issue (25 July) 



COMING 



Should commercials entertain? 

Noble-Dury agency, Nashville, believes television commercials should entertain 
as well as sell in order to hold viewer attention. This is how their philosophy 
has worked out in practice for accounts ranging from meat packer to candy 25 Jtllu 



52 



54 



56 



57 



Editor and President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenn 
Vice President-Genl. Manager: Bernard Piatt 
Vice Pres.-Advg. Director: Jacob A. Evans 
Editorial Director: Miles David 
Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. Jaffe 
Associate Editor: Evelyn Konrad 
Department Editor: Lila Lee Seaton 
Assistant Editor: Ed Feldmann 
Contributing Editors: Bob Foreman, Joe Csida 
Editorial Assistant: Florence Ettenberg 
Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Lester Cole 
Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper 
(Western Manager), Allan H. Giellerup 
(Southwest Manager), Arnold Alpert (Mid- 
west Manager), John A. Kovchok (Produc- 
tion Manager), Charles L. Nash 
Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz (Sub- 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Morton C. 
Kahn, Minerva Mitchell 
Office Manager: Catherine Scott Rose 
Readers' Service: Augusta B. Shearman 
Accounting Department: Eva M. Sanford 
Secretary to Publisher: Janet Whittier 



ISA M's tv test nears its close 

With next issue results in B&M television test will be virtually all in. Report „^ _ - 
will cover 25 weeks of the scheduled 26-week tv test £ ** «* M ' M 

0oiv to make the switch to filter tip 

This is what happened when an established conventional cigarette converted to 
a filter tip accompanied by heavy air advertising. A SPONSOR analysis that 
takes you into the thinking of important advertising decision-makers <&5 -fll/lf 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 
comb tned I with TV. Executive ^ orl *'; C'T' M*? U£? 
Advertising Offices 40 E 49th St (49U, & Madison). 
Nan York 17. N. T. Telephone: MLrcay Hill t-KU. 
a Jo Office: 161 E. Grand Ave. Phone: Superior 
7 9SM. Los Angeles Office: 60S7 Sunset Boulevard^ 
Phone: Hollywood 4-8089 Printing Office: 3U0 E\m 
Ave.. Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions: United State. 
18 a vear, Canada and foreign S9. Single copiet 50c. 
Printed in U.S.A. Address all correspondence to 40 
E 49th St New York 17. N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2nJ. 
Copyright 1955. SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 




KTHS 



(LITTLE ROCK) 



SAILS INTO Cove, TOO! 



Advertisers on 50,000-watt KTHS get a lot more than 
Metropolitan Little Rock. They get cover- 
age throughout most of Arkansas. 

KTHS drops a strong anchor in Cove, for example. 
This little West Arkansas town has only 482 
people — but combined with thousands of 
other towns and villages and farms, it helps 
account for KTHS's daytime coverage of 
more than 3-1/3 MILLION people. 



In Arkansas, KTHS is the BIG radio valut 
Basic CBS in Little Rock. 



-KTHS, 



KTHS 



50,000 Watts 
CBS Radio 



BROADCASTING FROM 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

Represented by The Branham Co. 
Under Same Management as KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. G. Robertson, General Manager 



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Th. Station KTHS daytime primary ' 
hat • pavulatia* •( I.0O2.7M ■«•*■*. •( »»•• aw 
100.000 it nat m*haj primary da>1l«if wnrler fraaa 
any othw radia «tatio* . . . Otjr iat*rfareae»-fr*# 
daytime eovtragt area has a papulation af 3.372.*13. 




Volume 4: The 4th year 
Chapter I: Summer 1955 

KBIG celebrates 3rd birthday June 1 with 
I Id advertisers, 1955 running 22% ahead 
of an excellent 1954. 

RAB awards plaques in annual "Radio 
(.ets Results" contest. Three go to South- 
ern California — all to KBIG, honoring 
Sturdy Dog Food (Morning News) , Sak- 
rcte Readymix Cement (Noon News) , 
Trewax Floor Wax (Spots) . In 1954 also, 
KBIC was the only Southern California 
station honored in this competition. 

L.A. Advertising Women award Annual 
Frances Holmes "Lulu" to writer Margee 
Phillips for creative advertising writing 
(I'on's Grocery Homemakers News). 

Radio-Television News Club of Southern 
California awards KBIG news director 
Larry Berrill "Colden Mike" trophy for 
Most Enterprising News Show. For 3rd 
consecutive year KBIG is only Indepen 
dent Station to receive a Golden Mike. 

Summer ratings repeat Winter story: Of 
only 4 stations powerful enough and 
popular enough to cover all Southern 
California, as measured by key markets 
Los Angeles and San Diego, KBIG, the 
only Independent, delivers by far the 
greatest number of listeneis per dollar 
invested. 




JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, California 
Telephone: Hollywood 3-3205 

Nat. Rep. Robert Meeker & Assoc. Inc. 



liirtip 



oil 



\) 








Don Atnsden, Allen & Reynolds, Omaha, Neb., 
leels that the greatest opportunity in radio is 
being overlooked — weekends. For clients whose 
natural interest lies in reaching the family as a 
group weekends, he feels, are particularly 
valuable. He says that clients tend to over- 
emphasize the "golden hours" of early morning. 
"The competition is terrific and so is the 'din' 
created by close spotting. But weekend radio, espe- 
dally in this inland region of the Midwest, with 
its opportunity to reach the family at its leisure 
is \ cry attractive — especially suited to the use 
<>i saturation spot packages. Station rate cards are 
finally shaping up in a new form which includes 
more and more attractive packages — combina- 
tions of minutes, chainbreaks and l.D.'s for clients." 



Peter M. Karduvh. Foote, Cone & Belding, 
New York, makes these predictions for 1955: 
"A lot of c'ients and agencies may be surpised this 
lull and winter as color set sales and circulation 
really get under way. Most of the manufacturers 
have announced definite /dans for color sets," 
says he, "available late this summer at prices around 
$700 and S8G0. Remember the days when a black 
and white set cost over $400? People bought, 
and that was when the number of available programs 
acre a third compared with today. The upcoming 
liar' between CBS TV and NBC TV for spectac- 
ular supremacy will ie won by the viewers. The 
trend toward the magazine concept will grow since 
only a few giant automotive and soap companies 
can afford week to week exposure." 



Sam B. Yitt, Biow-Beirn-Toigo, New York, says 

that the magazine concept of tv programing has 
decreased the importance of personality selling. 
"There's no longer any exclusivity," says he. "The 
Garroways and Gleasons sell for any and every- 
body who buys their program. In our opinion, 
this does not enhance believability. And the result 
is that the viewer, more than ever before, has to 
be reai hed by the merits of the product and not 
the aura of the personality. IT e feel that this makes 
for a new trend toward spot tv. The key to 
moving products for many clients, and especially 
in large market arras, today is penetration 
rather than personalities." There have been 
studies showing for some products personalities 
increase sales. But were these studies recent?" 



SFONSOR 



I 




NEW YORK 

BOSTON 

BUFFALO 

CHICAGO 

CLEVELAND 

PITTSBURGH 

MINNEAPOLIS 

SAN FRANCISCO 

SEATTLE 

HOLLYWOOD 

LOS ANGELES 

DETROIT 

DALLAS 

ATLANTA 



CAMPBELL SOUP COMPANY 

I ampht-W i s.in/11 

" Lassie" 

"Campbell Star Stage" (starting Sept. 9) 

DE SOTO-PLYMOUTH DEALERS OF AMERICA 

"You Bel Yuur Life " -.t.irnnK Gr o u cho M.ir\ 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS A CO. (INC.) 

"Cavalcade of Am»-n< .1 ' 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

"The General ElflClllC Theater" 

GENERAL MILLS. INC. 

Befij ( r... k.r ( „k. \l,x. 1. nlhrr (.rnrral WiH. Vr„.l». I. 

"Bob Crosby Show' legment) 
"Robert i) Lewis" (segment! 
"Mickey Mouse Club" segment) 
■ Lone Ranger" 1 iimmi nl 
"The ( leorge Bums & Grade Allen Show■'• 

(start iriR Od 
THE B. F. GOODRICH CO. 
/ w. -•..,,, r ;„/,./. .. /,>,, 
"The George Burns 8 Gracie Allen Show"* 

LEVER BROTHERS COMPANY 

■>»'/" tll-furi DfUnmni 

"Art Linkletter'a House r u 

MINNESOTA MINING & MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

"SeOlek" lir,,n.l I , U.,,,1,.1,,. 1 apr. I>,hrr. 

"Arthur Godfrey Time" (segment) 
REVLON PRODUCTS CORP. 
'Salln-Si 1 

11.. 964 000 Question" (segment) 
"The Johnny Canon Show" iso«ment) 
UNITED STATES STEEL CORP. 

el Hour"* 
WILDROOT COMPANY, INC. 

' It lldrOOt I r.-am Oil" 

"Bohin Hood" -.i.irting SeptemN 



RADIO 

BRISTOL-MYERS COMPANY 

"Bon" /I. .../.. rnnl 

"Arthur Godfrey Time" -i-cment) 

DE SOTO-PLYMOUTH DEALERS OF AMERICA 

You Bet , > mcho \l.ir* 

GENERAL MILLS, INC. 

11,1 1 x ( r„, k.r I „k. Wit. -.. ..Irtr, I ..„.,., 1 \j , 1 1 . fr.^Mrff 

"\xyrw I {.in ■ 

LEVER BROTHERS COMPANY 

"Surf lll-l'ur/ DrtarvaJ 

Art Linkletter 1 Hon 

MINNESOTA MINING A MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

' V..f./i" Hrnn.i t .llnphanr Tnp*. Othrri 

Arthu- lent 1 



■Mtem.ite w ee ks 



BATTEN, BARTON, DURSTINE & OSBORN, INC. 



11 JULY 1955 



Harvest 



Each year America's rooftops yield 
a new harvest— a vast aluminum 
garden spreading increasingly over 
the face of the nation. 

The past season produced a bumper 
crop on all counts: 314 million new 
antennas bringing the total number 
of television homes to 34,567,000. 

The average television family spent 
more time watching its screen than 
ever— 5 hours and 20 minutes a day. 






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Day and night CBS Television 
broadcast the majority of the most 
popular programs and during the 
past season extended its popularity 

by enlarging the network to 209 
stations— a 75\ increase in a year. 

Today CBS Television delivers more 
homes for less money than any other 
network, and in comparison with 
its closest competitor, offers an even 
better buy than it did a year ago. 

V- 



CBS Television advert; 

sir,:,, ncs, niio ,,ver the past 12 month 

—a 20* - greater investmenl than 

made on any other network. 

By demonstrating television's abi 

to move our expanding national product 

into the American home most efficU ntly, 
CBS Television has become the world's 
largest single advertising medium. 

THE CBS TELEVISION NETWORK 

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7*ie 'Voice *£ 'SattuHvie 

features outstanding 
local programming! 



\ Hugh Wanke's 
CLOCK 

I „ solesmar. on 

Today's «P e , mom i n g 

Mon. thru Sat. 



~> 



»'•' NEIGHBOR 

Vear ° W ^^ ^ women 

9 to 9:55 A.M. 
"Ion. thru Fri. 



600 
SERENADE 

v/ith 
« T he Music Man 

aT oppopp.*- s ^ W - 

3:45 to 5:15 P.M. 
Mon. thru Fri. 



HEADLINES 
IN SPORTS 

wifh 

Roger Griswold 

One of the fop sporfscasfers 
in the East. 
5:45 to 6 P. M. 

Mon. thru Fri. 



L. 



lroy 



1 

MADISON 

M'onsok invites letters to the editor. 
Address 40 E. 49 St., New York 17. 

TIMEBUYINC TIPS 

The "Tips on timebuying from six 
veterans" article in the 27 June issue 
was most interesting. Above all I think 
it goes to prove that timebuyers are 
really human beings and not just ma- 
( hines without feeling as many station 
men and reps like to intimate from 
time to time. Without exception all 
six buyers stressed the importance of 
intangibles in timebuving. something 
that all of us here at Foote, Cone & 
Belding try hard not to overlook. 

My only complaint is the picture 
you used of Frank Silvernail. You've 
made one of the sweetest guys in the 
business look like the devil himself. 
Whoever wrote the article did a good 
job. I am all in favor of humanizing 
the timebuyer. 

Peter M. Bardach 
Radio & Tv Timebuyer 
Foote, Cone & Belding 
New York 

• For a picture of Frank Silvernail in a more 
natural pose, see |> . . < 210, this issue. And for 
more tips on timebuying see Timebuying Basics, 
which starts on page 209. 



1 



CBS BASIC • 600 KC 
5000 WATTS 



REPRESENTED BY RAYMER 



TV VIEWING 

We are interested in learning how 
many hours daily the average person 
watches television. If you have any 
data on this subject or can refer us 
to other sources of information, we 
would appreciate it very much. We 
were referred to you by our local tele- 
vision station WHAM-TV. 

Dorothy Kanwischer 

Librarian 

Kemp Research Org. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

• The 1955 Television Basics, page 3, gives 
the figure for daily average home viewing : near 
4.5 hours. 



W00LW0RTH 

I am very much impressed with 
v our reprint on the story on the Wool- 
worth Show from the 18 April issue 
of sponsor. Would you please advise 
the cost of 100 copies of this reprint? 
We would like to mail them to local 
accounts. 

Howard W. Meagle 

Promotion Manager 

WWVA 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

I • lOO copies of the reprint cost $10. 



PROCTER & GAMBLE 

In the last four issues of SPONSOR 
there have appeared four articles on 
P&G. These articles were both enjoy- 
able and enlightening. 

The agency personnel, especially 
those affiliated with P&G, felt that we 
should have some additional copies of 
these articles for reference. 

Therefore, I would like to request 
copies of the four articles. 

Al Bro.n stein 
Research Department 
Biotv-Beirn-Toigo 
New York 

• The P&G serie- began in the 16 May i-*ue. 
Reprints will soon l>e available. 



GUARANTEED CIRCULATION 

The 2 May I'J.S.5 "Sponsor Asks" 
discussed the pros and cons of "guar- 
anteed circulation." The concept of 
a "guaranteed circulation" inferred 
that if the value of exposures are 
achieved I i.e. delivered by the me- 
dium I. the charge stipulated would be 
paid by the advertiser. If the figure 
is not attained, a cost penalty is in- 
voked: if the figure is exceeded, the 
advertiser would be expected to pav 
a premium. 

Here are a few of the problems 
which such a concept immediately 
brings to bear: 

1. Who is to establish the standard 
for measurement? Is it to be the over- 
all circulation of a magazine, or the 
exposure to the advertiser's ad in that 
magazine? Is it to be the listeners to 
the weekly schedule of a network op- 
eration, or a specific program, which 
an advertiser might buy? Or, would 
it be the listeners to the advertiser's 
commercial within the program? 

2. What organizations are to be ac- 
cepted as the proof of "guaranteed 
circulation"? Starch? Audit Bureau 
of Circulation? Nielsen? Would this 
remove all competition from the mea- 
surement field and establish a mo- 
nopoly, or can many companies exist 
in such an atmosphere 

3. Who will establish the unit cost 
criterion? Will this be the same in 
magazines as it is in tv? Does a noter 
to a full page ad in Life receive the 
same amount of impact as a viewer 
to an advertiser's tv commercial? 

4. Would such a system eliminate 
the small budget advertiser in tv who 
would buy an unknown program onlv 
to find that its success and the pre- 



10 



SPONSOR 




1M1M 




Vacation bound? Co by kilocycle 




"v\ 



This consumer-type copy is provided 
h\ W'M I , a radio station in Eastern 
Iowa with consumer-type listeners — 
more, in Eact, in its 33-county primary 
area than all other radio stations in 
the area combined. For details see 
the man from katz. 



11 JULY 1955 



U 




"i 



c err "Tr^ 1 r - r 

c ' n w ' r 

en 




77iis fs 
San Francisco .. . 

where KCBS has "coverage 

that counts ! " Count 

the mail received by KCBS 

personality programs and 

you find pulling power, 

response in direct proportion 

to our Northern California 

population 




tnium he would have to pay would out- 
strip his pocketbook? Would networks 
experiment with quality programs 
without mass appeal (such as Omni- 
bus, See it Now, Meet the Press) if 
they were to know that the relatively 
low audience appeal would mean reve- 
nue penalties? Would the media in- 
sist upon greater control of editorial 
content in order to maximize their op- 
portunity of achieving their "guaran- 
tees?" 

5. What precedent is there in our 
economy to warrant such a concept? 
Does Procter & Gamble, in its manu- 
facture and distribution of a new prod- 
uct, guarantee to the retailer that it 
will sell? Should the retailers' sales 
fall below a certain figure, does P&G 
reimburse the retailer for any losses 
which might be incurred? Are maga- 
zines "guaranteeing" exposures to a 
commercial message once the maga- 
zine is brought into the home? 
D. W. COYLE 

Director of Tv Research 
ABC 



OPEN MINDED 

Please forward 10 reprints of your 
outstanding article "Are you morning- 
minded or open-minded?" in the 13 
June issue, and bill us accordingly. 
This is certainly another example of 
sponsor ringing the bell. Keep up the 
good work. 

John R. Mahoney 
Commercial Manager 
W1BG, Phila. 

• There are no reprints of this article, but 
copies of the 13 June issue are available at 
- "■ii for 1-10 copies, $.40 for 11-50 copies. 



50 .OOO WATT S 

Represented by CBS Radio 
Spot Sales 



HANDLING FILM 

We are endeavoring to set up a 
standard operating procedure for the 
handling, shipping and storing of film 
commercials. While we have ideas of 
our own which we will use, we are 
trying to gather other ideas and sys- 
tems to study and incorporate. 

We would appreciate it greatly if 
you would send us copies of any arti- 
cles which you may have run in your 
magazine which explain how agencies 
handle, ship and store their film 
commercials. 

Thomas S. Cadden 
Radio-Tv Director 
Krupnick & Associates 
St. Louis 

• The 8 February 1954 issue of SPONSOR 
carried a story on film service firms. These firms 
did about $53,000,000 worth of business in han- 
dling filmed commercials for producers, agencies 
and sponsors in 1954. 



INVESTIGATE 

I have been looking in SPONSOR for 
the lyrics of Hank Fort's song "Inves- 
tigate" but have been unable so far 
to find them. Can it be that I have 
missed them? 

Max D. Paglin 
Legal Asst. to 
Commissioner Bartley 
FCC 

• Reader I*..- in. is referring to the song writ- 
ten liy Hank Fort, ASCAP and presented at 
SPONSOR'S Tv Pioneer Dinner. It did not ran 
in the magazine, however. The lyrics went, in 
part, "The problems that confront the tv indus- 
try/ Are earning much concern from the FCC/ 
But simple solutions are now passe/ This is the 
way . . . we do it today/ Investigate . ■ . investi- 
gate/ If the problem is small or the problem is 
great/ We deliberate and procastinate/ But investi- 
gate and then we legislate. 

Should politicos be assigned their equal time?/ 
Should tv shows delete any theme of crime/ To 
help combat the juvenile delinquency ?/ Should 
we make it for "pay" or give it for "free?" In- 
vestigate," . . . etc. 



BUYERS' GUIDE 

I want to comment on your 1955 
Buyers' Guide. This is an excellent 
compilation of program material, 
which should prove very useful and 
helpful to many buyers in the business. 
I am sure they share my sentiments. 
You are to be congratulated on another 
fine contribution to the industry. 
Arthur S. Pardoll 
Director of Broadcast Media 
Foote, Cone & Belding 
New York 



The Buyers' Guide certainly contains 
much valuable information. As some 
of us here reviewed its contents the 
other day, the remark, "I wish we had 
this book last month" was made sev- 
eral times. 

Thaddeus S. Kelly 
Radio-Tv Supervisor 
McCann-Erickson 
New York City 



Congratulations on a terrific book 
listing all of the various types of pro- 
grams and also, thanks for the nice 
job you did with the radio and tv 
farm directors. I appreciate this a 
great deal. This should serve as a 
ready reference for a good many peo- 
ple are constantly calling me for such 
information. 

Phil Alampi 

Farm & Garden Director 

WRCA 

New York 

(Please turn to page 303) 



12 



SPONSOR 




ON-TARGET TELEVISION 




KUDNER AGENCY, INC. 

NEW YORK DETROIT LOS ANGELES WASHINGTON SAN FRANCISCO 



11 JULY 1955 



13 



WHAT IS "HARD SELL. 



>^^>^^cr 





2. 



A COMMERCIAL THAT WHISPERS, 
OR ONE THAT SHOUTS? 






IS IT 



1 



A SHORT COMMERCIAL, 
OR A LONG ONE? 



1 




A FUNNY COMMERCIAL, OR A 
SERIOUS, FACTUAL ONE? 



IN TV 



as in practically everything else, what is one advertiser's 
meat, may very often be another's poison. 

At McCann-Erickson, we approach each individual TV 
advertiser's problem, as an individual problem. 

And we have found, more often than not, that when the 
inventiveness and creative skills of able people— thoroughly 
seasoned specialists in all phases of TV 

. . . combines with the wealth of experience gained from placing 
over one billion two hundred million dollars of advertising . . . 

the usually inevitable result is the kind of hard-hitting TV that 
sells products, service and ideas with force and efficiency. 



A GENTLY PRODDING MESSAGE. 
OR ONE THAT SLEDGE-HAMMERS 
THE STORY HOME? 



M c CANN-ERICKSON, mo. 

ADVERTISING 

Nc« *i ■ Cleveland. Detroit. Louis\ilk. Chicago. 

Houston. Dallas. Portland. Los Angeles. San Francisco 



KSDO 

TOPS AGAIN 

In The Billion Dollar 
San Diego Market 

For years we've been telling the same 
story . . . KSDO is tops in San Diego. Just 
in case you like fiddling with ratings — 
here's the whole ball of wax as reported 
by Mister Hooper. 



HOOPER RADIO 
AUDIENCE INDEX 

Months: MAY-JUNE 1955 



TIME: 





KSDO 


Station #2 


Mon. thru Fri. 








8 am-12 noon 


25.5 




11.4 


Mon. thru Fri. 








12 noon-6 pm 


24.2 




17.1 


Sunday 








9 am-12 noon 


26.6 




9.7 


Sunday 








12 noon-6 pm 


57.0 




9.3 


Saturday 








8 am-6 pm 


37.2 




15.1 



KSDO "KASH BOX" 

absolutely the biggest Label-Pull 
in San Diego 

135,000 LETTERS 
135,000 LABELS 

in less than 6 months. 

Write — Call 

For Availabilities 



KSDO 

1130 KC 5000 WATTS 



S. NATIONAL BANK BLDC. 
SAN DIECO 1, CALIF. 
BEImonr 2-2041 

KSDO 

7 730 K C 5000 WATTS 

Representatives 

John E. Pearson Co. 

New York — Chicago 

Daren McCavren — San Francisco 

Hugh Feltis — Associates — Seattle 

H. Qucnton Cox & Assoc, Portland 

Walt Lake— Los Angeles 




by Bob Foreman 

Fait program pivot: tv's 7:30-8 "feed-in" block 

Having conditioned myself over so many months and pages 
to avoid the factual in favor of the conjectural, I find it diffi- 
cult to tailor this tract to the particular editorial slant of the 
issue. However, I will attempt to marshal a few "fall facts" 
as they have appeared before me and as they seem to bear 
upon the coming season of television. 

The more obvious items, mentioned in this series before, 
include the decided trend toward family-type programing. 
This concept made its hat out of the straws in the wind of 
this present season's activities in television; to wit, Lassie 
and Disney and a few other isolated cases in point where the 
programs have by their virtue and time slot attracted sizeable 
numbers of children and adults in about a 50-50 proportion. 

CBS intelligently inspected this and then applied the re- 
search to its program-structure by the adroit method of clear- 
ing out Monday through Friday from 7:30 to 8:00 p.m. 
Next season the aim is to fill this half-hour strip with family 
shows, shows which will not drive the youngsters away, shows 
which will get them to keep the dial CBS-wards and bring 
Mom and Pop into the room to watch the show too. An ideal 
climate for the advertising of many products; an excellent 
technique to assure large numbers of homes tuning in and a 
sizeable viewers-per-set figure. With one possible exception, 
it seems to me the properties lined up will achieve same. 

Since NBC programing at that time next year presumably 
will be about as it was this year, the new look at CBS, of 
course, pits this network solidly against ABC. What the out- 
come will be is hard to say. Whether Disneyland or Rin Tin 
Tin or The Lone Ranger will suffer remains to be seen. Sets- 
in-use should climb, however, making it possible for the pro- 
grams on both networks to prosper. Nevertheless, NBC, with 
its decidedly different programing (news and 15-minute 
musicals), may hold onto most of its audience, making for 
three happy sponsors per half hour. 

However, if CBS steals the show, it will hurt ABC's rise 
not only at 7:30 but in the shows that use these slots as feed- 
ins. The CBS plan could force NBC to alter its programing. 

Another fact, reported as a whisp of smoke on the horizon 

some months ago in these pages, was the "adult Western" 

binge. Pardner, we'll see plenty of 10-gallon hats and six 

shooters in our living rooms this fall, adorning shows that 

(Column continues page 18 I 



16 



SPONSOR 




YOUNG & RUBICAM, INC. 

Advertising • New York Chicago Detroit San Fram 



11 JULY 1955 



17 




in the 
SOUTH'S 



FIGURES 



fastest from'nq 

market/ 



POPULATION 

1940 88,415 

1953 197,000 

RETAIL SALES 

1940 ... % 20,251,000 
1953 . . . $184,356,000* 



RANKS 92nd IN EFFEC- 
TIVE BUYING INCOME 

HIGHEST PER CAPITA 
INCOME IN LOUISI- 
ANA 

WORLD S MOST COM 
PLETE OIL CENTER 

CHEMICAL CENTER OF THE SOUTH 

DEEP WATER PORT 

To see your sales reach 
their greatest heights in 
this rich petrochemical 
market, select WAFB-TV, 
Baton Rouge's first TV 
station, with highly-rated 
network and local shows 
from 6:55 am to midnight. 

Tom E. Gibbens 
PRESIDENT & Gen. Manager 





Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 
National Representative 



'East Baton Rouge Parish, Survey 
of Buying Power, 1954 



AGENCY AD LIBS (Continued) 

are adult to varying degrees. In each of these cactuscapers, 
it is safe to say that the amount of gun play will be in inverse 
proportion to the amount of plot and it is to be hoped that 
characterization will, at least here and there, live up to the 
description "adult" by appearing in tones of gray instead 
of all black or all white. 

There will be more spectaculars and more competition 
for name talent and name writers than there was even this 
passing year. All of which means budgets are still in for 
a hike — as they have to be to accommodate such boosts. 

It's entirely possible CBS may have its first competition 
for daytime audiences what with NBC's new moves and sales. 
However, the CBS lineup of personalities and easy-goin' 
formats will still be hard to beat and they fully deserve the 
lead they've gotten which they mean to hold on to if they can. 

I wish I had a tireless editorial curiosity which would 
compel me to delve into how many new advertisers are sched- 
uled to take the plunge into network tv. On the surface, it 
looks like there won't be many new names or logotypes before 
the cameras; instead the big users seem to be getting bigger. 

Spot and local-program television is bound to increase 
since good network time is harder and harder to come by. 
Furthermore, the quantity as well as quality of product being 
offered for sale on a market basis, both first run and rerun, 
is far greater in quality as well as quantity. 

They tell me that video tape is getting closer by the minute 
and next year it would be exciting news to find some in use 
if only on a once-in-a-while trial basis. 

As for color, it still seems a long way off mainly for 
economic reasons. But the General at NBC has a cutie up 
his sleeve and he may darn well be right about doing his kid 
strips in full color for it's the kids, he believes, that can 
hurry the hues along for all of us. 

Which brings me to radio. I honestly believe that we'll 
see more and more advertisers rediscovering the medium. 
Some really creative programing, adapted to the problems 
of the day, is bound to pay off. Our methods of checking 
this elusive medium should be sharper by next fall, and our 
ability to buy it more flexible. Both of these fall facts should 
contribute to radio's rebirth. 

In conclusion, it should be a rewarding year, all in all, 
for advertiser and audience alike and a hectic but interesting 
one for those engaged in any phase of broadcasting. * * * 



Letters to Bob Foreman are welcomed 

Do you always agree with the opinions Bob Foreman ex- 
presses in "Agency Ad Libs?" Bob and the editors of sponsor 
would be happy to receive and print comments from readers. 
Address Bob Foreman, c/o SPONSOR, 40 E. 49 St. 



18 



SPONSOR 




SgsSfc- 



Big Mike is staking out claim to some 100,000 addi- 
tional families as a result of KFAB's switch to NBC 
from CBS. These listeners represent, in round num- 
ber, those lost to other CBS stations with overlap- 
ping primary areas . . . three CBS stations in a 
300-mile line. KFAB is the only NBC station in the 
same area. The situation is even more favorable to 
KFAB when you compare the "CBS frequencies" . . . 
570— WNAX Yankton, 590— WOW Omaha, and 
580— WIBW Topeka. It's simple arithmetic that 
the CBS audience will now be split three ways. 

It all adds up to the fact that "three in a row gives 
NBC-KFAB an even bigger show." 

Free & Peters will be glad to tell you how they feel 
about it. So will General Manager Harry Burke. 



• 



?0 ROI 






- 



\ 




KFAB 



tniii |B( radio 




11 JULY 1955 



19 



THE AIR UNIVERSITY- 
in the service area 
$52,000,000 boost to 



"7/ M?A™ A "il " e J aSe - h °" e ° f m ° nr 9re °' mm ° r * Collations 
of WSFA-TV. Th.s Montgomery base alone, last year, provided a 
the economic growth of the New South. 



STATE CAPITOL BUILDINGS-showing the new $3,000,000 state 
off.ce bu.ldmg which flanks Alabama's historic State Capitol 
Mere the Confederate States of A 



merica was organized. 




PICTURED BELOW, Largest indoor arena in the world, Alabama's Coliseum in 
Montgomery seats 13 000 with vision unblocked by supporting pillar because 
o ,ts un,aue suspended concrete roof. Strikingly new in design the Co, Zm 
9 o great a,d in the expansion of agriculture andindusiryinZ 





NORMANDALE — o J2.500.000 suburban shopping center — boosts 200.000 square feet of ultra modern 
stores and parking for 5,000 cars One of Montgomery! newest centers, Normandale includes a com- 
plete department store and medical building as well as the largest super market in Alabama 



Chan&eth... 




giving way to the NEW 



■I 



The Old Order . . . the era of Crinoline skirts and Mimosa- 
fringed mansions ... is now replaced by an industrial and agricul- 
tural growth remarkable in any section of the country. Vibrant 
growth, boundless energy, optimism and opportunity are the 
Order of the New. 

WSFA-TV serves this area from the capitol city of Mont- 
gomery . . . serves a population of 1,118,643, producing retail sales 
in 1954 of $667,339,000.00. A keynote to the tremendous develop- 
ment of this area is the fact that Metropolitan Montgomery out- 
ranks in retail-sales-per-household such cities as Birmingham, 
Mobile, New Orleans, Baltimore and San Diego. The pattern of 
this area is tailor-made for television. And WSFA-TV's coverage 
is a new, un-duplicated audience receiving "Class A" television 
service for the first time. 

An increasing list of advertisers are recognizing the "changing 
order" . . . and are now reaching and selling this new market on 
WSFA-TV in Montgomery, Alabama! 



Channel 




New, unduplicated, regional coverage with 316.000 wotti, 
from a 1,040 foot antenna, 21 miles south of Montgomery. 
Favorable terrain, plus quality programming, puis WSFA- 
TV's picture in homes all the woy to the Gulf Coast' 



WSFA-TV 

MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 

HOYT ANDRES, Station Mgr. • JOHN HUGHES. Soles Mgr. 





TELEVISION 




II J III 




WSFA-TV MARKET DATA 

Population 1,11 8,643 

Total Retail Sales $667,339,000.00 

Consumer Spendable Income $963,398,000.00 

Note: In retail soles per -household, Montgomery Metropoli- 
tan areo Outranks Birmingham, Mobile, New Orleans, 
Baltimore, Cincinnati and San Diego. 

Owned and operated by THE OKLAHOMA PUBLISHING CO. 

The Daily Oklahomon, Oklahoma City Times, The 

Farmer-Stockmon, WKY, WKYTV & WSFA 

Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 




I 



*w 



CONTINENT BROADCASTING COMPANY 



President: Todd Storz 



WHB, Kansas City 
Represented by 
John Blair & Co. 



WTIX, New Orleans 
Represented by 
Adam J. Young, Jr. 



KOWH, Omaha 
Represented by 
H-R Reps., Inc. 



Everv Omaha daytime quarter hour 
—save four— belongs to KOWH. In 
18 quarters, KOWH has more than 
half the available audience.* Aver- 
age a.m. audience: 46.6% : afternoon, 
19.4%; all-day 48.3%. You can't 
buy a bad time. Now is the time for 
KOWH to come to your aid. Call 
for an H-R man, or KOWH General 
Manager. Virg Sharpe. 



"Hooper Continuing Measurements. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Von.Sut., Feb.-May. 1955 



22 



SPONSOR 



New and renew 



smash 



11 JULY 1955 



1. New on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


PROGRAM. KlM, «Urt. duration 


Amor Chicle. LIC. for Dcntyne 


D F S NY 


NBC 82 


Caesar Presents. M 8-9 pm 4 July 13 wks 


Amcr Chicle. LIC 


Ted Bates. NY 


NBC 


10-4 


Summer Theatre, alt T 9-9 30 pm 5 July 8 wkt 


Amcr Oil Co. Bait 


Joseph Katz. Bait 


CBS 


45 


Windows, summer replacement for Person N 
son. alt T 9 30 1 pm 21 |unc 14 .. 


Amcr Motors. Detr 


Ceycr Adv. NY 


ABC 


full net 


Dateline Disneyland. Sun 7 30 9 pm . 17 |uly only 


Amcr Tobacco. NY. for Lucky Strike 


BBDO. NY 


NBC 


150 


Your Pl.iy Time, replacement for Your Hit Parade 
Sat 10 30 11 pm. 18 |unc. 12 wks 


Armour & Co. Chi 


FC&B. Chi 


NBC 


126 


And H.n s rhi Show summ. i n| for 
Cobel. 3 of 4 Sat 10 10 30 pm 9 |uly 


Borden. NY 


Y&R. NY 


NBC 


81 


Make the Connection; reolacement for Justio Th 
8 30 9 pm; 1 |uly 13 wks 


Brown & Williamson. Louisville. Ky 


Ted Bates. NY 


CBS 


138 


Undcrcurrc nt , '.ummif replacement for 
Up: alt F 10-1030 pm . 1 July 13 wks 


CBS-Col, NY 


Ted Bates. NY 


CBS 


75 


Arthur Godfrey s Talent Scouts alt M 8 30 9 pm 
27 June; 52 wks 


Dow Chemical. Midland, Mich 


McManus. |ohn & Adams. 
Bloomticld Hills 


CBS 


68 


Arthur Godfrey Time; Th 11-11:15 am: 16 |un. 
26 wks 


Ccncral Foods. White Plains 


Y&R. NY 


CBS 


75 


Johnny Orson Show .lit Th 10-10 30 pm 7 Julv 

52 wks 
Dateline Disneyland July 17. 1955; Sun 7 30-9 


Cihson Greeting Card Co. Cin 


Stockton. West & Burk- 


ABC 


full net 




hart. Cm 






pm 17 July only 


Gillette. Boston 


Maxon. Dctr 


NBC 


134 


Highlights of the Week in th; World of Sports 
F 10-10 30 pm; 1 July 9 wks 


Hamm Brewing. St Paul 


Campbcll-Mithun. Mnnpls 


CBS 


30 


Window, summit replacement for Person to 
son all T 9 30-10 pm; 21 June; 14 wks 


Hazel Bishop. NY 


Raymond Spcctor, NY 


NBC 


78 


The Dunningcr Show. Sat 8 30-9 pm; 2 July 10 

wks 

Cimco Theatre; alt Sun 10-10 30 pm ; 3 July 8 

wks 
Summer Theatre, alt T 9-9:30 pm; 5 July: 8 wks 


Intcrnatl Ccllucotton. Chi. for Kleenex 


FC&B Chi 


NBC 


127 


Intcrnatl Ccllucotton. Chi. for Kleenex 


FC&B. Chi 


N8C 


104 


S. C. Johnson & Son, Racine, Wis 


Nccdham, Louis & Brorby. 
Chi 


NBC 


97 


Robert Montgomery Presents the |ohnson's Wax 
Summer Theatre: alt M 9:30-10:30 pm 4 July 
10 wks 


S. C- Johnson & Son. Racine, Wis 


Nccdham. Louis & Brorby. 
Chi 


CBS 


69 


Spotlight Pl.iyhouse; summer replacement for th. 
New Red Skclton Show; alt T 9 30 10 pm 21 
June; 14 wk> 


Liggett & Myers. NY 


C&W. NY 


CBS 


123 


Tv's Top Tunes. Sat 10-10 30 pm . 9 July . 55 wks 


Maytag Co. Newton, la 


McC-E. Chi 


CBS 


119 


To be announced; alt T 8-8 30 pm 12 July 52 

wks 
And Here's the Show: summer replacement for 


Pet Milk. St Louis 


Cardner. St Louis 


NBC 


126 










Cobel; 3 out of 4 Sat 10-10 30 pm. 9 July. 










13 wks 


Pet Milk. St Louis 


Gardner. St Louis 


CBS 


87 


Spotlight Playhouse: summer replacement for th. 
New Red Skclton Show; alt T 9 30 10 pm 21 
June; 14 wks 


Pharmaceuticals. Newark, for Ceritol. 


Edward Klctter, NY 


ABC 


108 


Masquerade Party; alt W 9-9 30 pm . 13 July. 52 


Serutan. RDX 








wks 


P&C, Cin, tor Lilt, Prcll 


B-B-T NY 


NBC 


127 


Cameo Theatre: alt Sun 10-10:30 pm ; 3 July 8 

Those Whiting Girls alt M 9 9 30 pm ; 4 July: 8 

wks 
Undercurrent; summer replacement for The Linc- 


Procter & Camble, Cin, for Lilt 


B-B-T. NY 


CBS 


150 


Procter & Camble, Cin 


Y&R. NY 


CBS 


138 










Up; alt F 10-10:30 pm : 1 July 13 wks 


Procter & Camble. Cin 


B-8-T. NY 


CBS 


59 


Down You Go: alt Sat 9 30-10 pm ; 11 June 4 wks 


Prudential Insurance. Newark 


Calkins & Holdcn. NY 


CBS 




Carry Moore Show; alt M 10 15-10 30 am 25 July 


RCA. NY 


K&E. NY 


NBC 82 


Caesar Presents: M 8-9 pm: 4 July 13 wks 


R. J. Reynolds Tobacco. Winston-Salem. 


Wm Esty. NY 


CBS 


81 


The Bob Cummings Show Th 8-8 30 pm ; 7 July 


NC. for Winstons 








52 wks 


SOS. Chi 


McC-E, SF 


CBS 


50 


Carry Moore Show alt F 10 30-10 45 am: 15 July 

52 wks 

Robert Montgomery Summer Theatre; alt M 9 30- 


Schick. Inc. Stamford. Conn 


K&E. NY 


NBC 


97 










10:30 pm: 4 July: 10 wks 


W. A. Shcaffcr, Ft Madison 


Russel M. Seeds. Chi 


CBS 


119 


To be announced: alt T 8-8 30 pm . 19 July 52 

wks 
Dateline Disneyland Sun 7 30-9 pm 17 July onl» 


Swift & Co. Chi 


McC-E. Chi 


ABC 


full net 


Toni Co. Chi 


Leo Burnett. Chi 


CBS 


76 


Carry Moore Show alt F 10 30-10 45 am 15 |ul» 


Toni Co. Chi 


Weiss & Gcllcr Chi 


NBC 


101 


Dollar a Second. T 9 30-10 pm; 5 July: 8 wks 


Warner-Hudnut. NY. for Quick Home 


K&E. NY 


NBC 


150 


Your Play Time; replacement for Your Hit Parade 


Pcrmanents 








Sat 10:30-11 pm 18 June: 12 wks 


Westinghouse Elec. Pittsburgh 


McC-E, NY 


CBS 


116 


Studio One Summer Theatre: M 10-11 pm ; 20 
June: 13 wks 


Whitehall Pharmacal, NY 


B-B-T. NY 


CBS 


59 


Down You Co: alt Sat 9:30-0 pm ; 11 June 



In next issue: Afir and Renetced on Radio \eltrorks ; Broadcast Imdmttrj Extcmti 

!\eic Firms. Mete Offices. Changes of Address : Station ( hanges; \ctc ts> n, > ippoimtmtemtt 











Bm m 




Tuttte 



11 JULY 1955 



23 



1 JULY 1955 



,\V?i/' and renew 




nyon 
e (3) 




alter A. 
wrence (3) 




lliam C. 

tcrson (3) 





i 

nt (3) 




2. Renewed on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



Borden. NY 

Chrysler Corp, Dodge Div, Dctr 

Chrysler Corp, Dodge Div, Detr 

Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City 
Chun King, Duluth 

General Mills, Mnnpls 

Hawaiian Pineapple Co, San Jose 
Knomark Mfg, Bklyn, for Lanol-White 
Thos. ). Lipton, Hoboken 

P&C, Cin, for Tide & Prell 

P&C, Cin, for Spic & Span, Cheer, Joy 

P&C, Cin, for Ivory Flakes, Cheer 
P&C, Cin, for Oxydol, Dreft, Ivory 

Snow, Camay 
P&C, Cin, for Ivory Soap, Duz, 

Cleem, Crisco 
Schlitz, Milw 

Toni, Chi 

Wm. Wrigley, Jr., Chi 



AGENCY 



D-C-S-S, NY 
Crant Adv, Detr 
Grant Adv, Dctr 

Ted Bates, NY 
JWT, Chi 

D-F-S, NY 

N. W. Ayer, SF 
Emil Mogul, NY 
Ted Bates, NY 

Benton & Bowles, NY 
B-B-T, NY 

Y&R, NY 

Benton & Bowles, NY 

Compton, NY 

Lennen & Newell, NY 

Leo Burnett, Chi 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Chi 



STATIONS 


CBS 
ABC 
ABC 


71 

175 
119 


CBS 
CBS 


130 
73 


CBS 


88 


CBS 
ABC 
CBS 


64 

115 

75 


CBS 
CBS 


123 

11 


CBS 
CBS 


115 

102 


CBS 


93 


CBS 


122 


CBS 


76 


CBS 


11 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Carry Moore; F 11:15-11:30 am; 8 July; 52 wks 
Break the Bank; Sun 10-10:30 pm; 3 July; 52 wks 
The Danny Thomas Show; alt T 9-9:30 pm; 12 

July; 52 wks 
The Millionaire; W 9-9:30 pm; 6 July; 52 wks 
Carry Moore; alt Th 10:15-10:30 pm; 14 July; 52 

Valiant Lady; M, W, F 12-12:15 pm; 1 June; 52 

wks 
Houseparty; F 2:45-3 pm; 29 July; 52 wks 
Masquerade Party; W 9-9:30 pm; 26 June; 13 wks 
Arthur Codfrey's Talent Scouts; alt M 8:30-9 pm; 

27 June; 52 wks 
On Your Account; M-F 4:30-5 pm; 4 July; 52 wks 
Search for Tomorrow; M-F 12:30-12:45 pm; 4 

July; 52 wks 
Brighter Day; M-F 4-4:15 pm; 4 July; 52 wks 
Welcome Traveler; M-F 1:30-2 pm; 4 July; 52 wks 

Cuiding Light; M-F 12:45-1 pm; 4 July; 52 wks 

Playhouse of Stars; F 9-9:30 pm; 1 July; 52 wks 

(after 7 Oct 9:30-10 pm) 
Carry Moore; alt Th 10:15-10:30 pm; 7 July; 4 

wks 
Gene Autry; 7-7:30 pm; 9 July; 52 wks 



3. Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 


NEW AFFILIATION 


Bruce Armstrong 


Y&R, NY 


Cunningham & Walsh, NY, acct exec 


Elias B. Baker 


Cunningham & Walsh, NY 


Carl S. Brown, NY, vp & acct exec 


Ceorge W. Bamberger 


Cardner Adv, St. Louis, acct exec 


Same, acct group supvr 


C. H. Bobertz 


Clark & Bobertz, Det, vp 


Same, also gen mgr 


Charles W. Butler 


Cardner Adv, St. Louis, asst acct exec 


Same, acct exec 


Richard N. Confer 


Campbell-Mithun, Mnnpls, acct exec 


McCann-Erickson, LA, acct exec 


Ruth Davis 


Norton & Condon, NY 


Product Services, NY, publ dir 


Mike Donovan 


B&B, NY, asst media dir 


Same, assoc media dir 


Ceorge F. Drake 


Ruthrauff & Ryan, Chi, exec planner 


MacFarland Aveyard, Chi, vp & creative dir 


James Eysler 


Wm. Weintraub, NY 


Peck Adv, NY, acct exec, member creative group 


Richard J. Farricker 


Kudner, Detr, mgr 


McC-E, Detr, vp & acct serv group hd 


John P. Fineran 


Westinghouse Elec Supply Co, NY, gen adv & sis prom 

mgr 
J. Walter Thompson, NY, v.p. 


K&E, NY, prom dept mdsg specialist 


Henry C. Flower, Jr. 


Same, vice chmn of the bd 


T. Robert Carry 


Emil Mogul, NY, asst mdsg & mktg dir 


Erwin, Wasey, LA, acct exec 


John Caunt 


Grant, Hllywd, r-tv dir 


Same, vp in chg W Coast r-tv 


Porter Harder 


BBDO, NY, media dir 


Same, SF, acct exec 


Robert E. Healy 


McCann-Erickson, NY, vp & gen mgr 


Same, exec vp 


Murray Hysen 


Crey Adv, NY, group supvr 


Ceyer Adv, NY, project dir, res 


Walter A. Lawrence 


Fuller & Smith & Ross, NY, acct supvr 


K&E, Chi, vp in chg Chi office 


Harry A. Lee 


Philippine Adv Assoc, Manila & Tokyo, pres 


J. Walter Thompson, SF, Pacific area mgr 


Kenyon Lee 


McManus, John & Adams, Det, vp 


Same, Miami, hd Miami office 


Myron S. Lewis 


Hudson Pulp & Paper, NY, adv dept 


Biow-Beirn-Toigo, NY, assoc acct exec 


N. R. Lorman 


Product Services, NY, dir of mdsg & sis prom 


Same, vp & member of plans bd 


William J. Lyons 


BBDO, NY 


Bozell & Jacobs, NY, asst to vp in chg r-tv 


James K. Maloney 


Lennen & Newell, NY, art dir 


Same, also vp 


David B. McCall 


David J. Mahoney, NY, copy chief 


Same, vp & creative dir 


Joel McPheron 


Ceyer Adv, NY, vp 


Compton, NY, acct group 


Samuel W. Meek 


J. Walter Thompson, NY, v.p. 


Same, vice chmn of the bd 


John E. Mosman 


Maxon, NY 


Biow-Beirn-Toigo, NY, mgr of r-tv 


Arthur Napoleon 


Free-lance writer 


Biow-Beirn-Toigo, Hllwyd, mgr r-tv 


William Patterson 


Crant, NY, mng dir r-tv 


Same, vp in chg r-tv, E Coast 


Stan Pforr 


Bozell & Jacobs, Seattle, acct exec 


Same, vp in chg creative serv 


Cail M. Raphael 


Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY, vp 


Lennen & Newell, NY, vp & copy group hd 


Stanley Resor 


J. Walter Thompson, NY, pres 


Same, chmn of the bd 


Thomas P. Rhoades 


Hudson Motor, Detr, dir of publ rels 


Campbell-Ewald, Detr, dir of publ rels 


Norman Rose 


Doyle, Dane Bernbach, LA, copy chf 


Same, acct exec 


Arthur R. Ross 


Tv writer, prodcr 


Campbell-Ewald, NY, E mgr, r-tv 


Thomas J. Ross 


Ruthrauff, & Ryan, NY, vp 


Lennen & Newell, NY, vp & acct exec 


Theodore W. Schwamb 


Edwards Food, LA, sis prom & adv mgr 


Erwin, Wasey, LA, sr acct exec 


John H. Sheldon 


Kudner, NY, special assignments 


Same, Detr, acct exec rep 


Lloyd Stackhouse 


Bozell & Jacobs, Seattle, asst mgr 


Same, vp & asst gen mgr 


William J. Stenson 


Weiss & Geller, Chi, timebuyer 


Campbell-Mithun, Chi, chief r-tv timebuyer 


Henry P. Stockbridge 


Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, NY, dir of mdsg 


Y&R, NY, acct exec 


Norman H. Strouse 


J. Walter Thompson, Detr,/mgr, dir vp, 


Same, NY, pres 


Felix M. Sutton 


Wm. H. Weintraub, NY 


Biow-Beirn-Toigo, NY, copy group hd 


Sylvan Taplinger 


Hirshon-Carfield, NY 


Peck Adv, NY, dir of r-tv 


Bill Tuttle 


Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY, vp in r-tv 


Fuller & Smith & Ross, N, hd r-tv dept 


Alex M. Victor 


Western Adv, LA 


Francis D. Gonda, Hllwyd. r-tv dir & acct exec 


W. W. Woodbridge Jr. 


Botsford, Constantine & Gardner, Seattle, vp & mgr 


D-F-S, SF, vp & gen mgr 


Parker Wood 


B,S, F & D, LA, vp 


Same, exec vp 


Sherm Wright 


Bowman & Block, r-tv dir 


Wm. A. Melrod Adv, Buffalo, vp in chg r-tv 



4. Sponsor Personnel Changes 



NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 




NEW AFFILIATION 


R. E. Anthony 


Pabst Brewing, Chi, dir of personnel & 


distr rel 


Same, gen sis mgr 


Archibald Douglass Jr 


Erwin, Wasey, LA, sr acct exec 




Sicks' Seattle Brewing & Malt 


James S. Fish 






General Mills. Mnnpls, dir of adv 


B. A. Graham 


Sunbeam, Chi 




Salem, chmn of bd 


R. P. Cwinn 


Sunbeam, Chi 




Same, pres & gen mgr 


H. A. Hebberd, Jr 


Stokely-Van Camp, Indpls, adv dept 




Same, asst to vp in chg mktg 


Durwood Markle, Jr 


BBDO, NY, contact 




Brecher Bros Leather, NY, ind rels mgr 


Henry Schachte 


Lever Bros, NY 




Same, adv vp 


Leyla Sefa 


Standard Oil Co of NJ 




Zotox Pharmacal, Stamford, Conn, adv mgr 


Maxwell Silverstein 


Clamorene NY, art dir 




Same dir adv 


H. R. Warren, Jr 


Stokely-Van Camp, Indpls, adv dept 




Same, gen sis asst to vp 


Paul H. Willis 


Carnation Co, LA, asst vp & gen adv 


ngr 


Same, vp in chg adv 



24 



SPONSOR 



WHO 



IS IOWA'S 



FAVORITE RADIO STATION 

FOR SPORTS AND SPORTS NEWS 




WHO 


WMT 


KRNT 


KWWL 


KICD 


KCRI 


KIOA 


KGLO 


WSUI 


KROS 


26.8% 


16.5% 


7.7% 


4.4% 


3.9% 


3.2% 


2.4% 


1.9% 


1.9% 


1.8% 



JL HE facts above are a tiny fraction of Iowa's listening 
habits and preferences — now brought up to date in the 
seventeenth annual Iowa Radio-Television Audience Survey, 
by Dr. Forest L. Whan. 

You should have a copy, because this completely authoritative 
study can remove the danger of guess-work or "hunches'' 
from your promotion plans in Iowa. Please write us, or 
Free & Peters. 

WHO is glad that our own interests are also best served 
when you know the full truth about radio and television 
in Iowa. 



^P" 




Affiliate 

FREE & PETERS. INC.. National Representatives 



BUY All of IOWA- 
Plmm "Iowa Plus"- with 



Dm Moines . . . 50,000 Worts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



11 JULY 1955 



25 





I 

\ 



\ 



«r 



Big budget or small, your prospects are bigger ami better when \i>u put jrour moi ■•■ on 

" \l\. Milwaukee's new CBS Television station. At card rates which .ire onlj 

as high as the cost of the other stations (maximum discounts applied), w\i\ ! - red 

in a matter of weeks to be the besl buy — by far — in the compacl 9even-count) \I 

marketing area. In term- of station break-, for example, U \I\ (whose 

have gone up L6.1 r c) averages l.'WI more viewers per dollar than the second station fv 

average rating- have droppe.1 21.V <).. .and 352* ,' more viewers per dollar than the t ; 

station (whose ratings have dropped 36.5^ I. Specifically, \\\i\ station breaks del 

an average of 19 viewers per penny! Putting it another ua\. that's a cosl ol onrj 

per thousand! 

Join the more than 300 local, national spol and network sponsors who are dow investing 
their advertising dollars on \\\i\. and gel more lor your money in Milwauk< 

WXIX Milwaukee CBS Owned Represented by < BS television Spot Sal 





v 



,framSfiI* U 



CAPITAL TYPES #S 




THE CIVIL SERVANT 

Card- file memory that goes 
back to McKinley. Favor- 
ite song: "I Wish I Could 
Shimmy Like My Sister 
Kate." Three-time winner 
of the Sack Race at the 
annual office picnic. 

Perennial winner at serv- 
ing the interests of ad- 
vertisers in the Washing- 
ton market is WTOP Radio. 
with(l) the largest aver- 
age share of audience (2) 
the most quarter-hour 
wins( 3 Washington's most 
popular local personal- 
ities and(4) ten times the 
power of any other radio 
station. WTOP represents 
the best for advertisers 
because it represents the 
best in broadcasting. 
That's why advertisers 
looking for capital sales 
results depend on Wash- 
ington's top station. 

WTOP RADIO 

Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 




Roger iff. Greene 



Director of Advertising 
Philip Morris & Co., New York 



"\\ hen Casey Stengel sends in a new pitcher, it doesn't mean that 
the guy going out was no good. Perhaps a change of pace is 
advantageous." 

That's how Roger Greene. Philip Morris & Co. advertising direc- 
tor, sums up PM's decision to drop / Love Lucy after more than five 
years, and the firm's switch to spot tv and outdoor advertising. He 
explains this tv event by saying that "spot tv seems like the answer 
to our problems today." Working closely with Television Bureau 
of Advertising, which proposed a spot tv schedule, Philip Morris is 
still spending more in tv than in any other medium. 

The new spot tv campaign, already on the air in one city, is the 
brainchild of Biow-Beirn-Toigo's executive v. p., John Toigo (see 
"The two Toigos," SPONSOR, 7 and 21 March 1955). Greene went 
out to the West Coast to give client okays during the production of 
commercials ( by Universal ) . 

"We feel that it's wrong and often phony for an advertiser to 
insist that his product or all action surrounding his product receive 
undue stress in a commercial," says Greene. "Take these new com- 
mercials of ours — people smoke in these films almost exactly as the) 
would off-camera. They don't make exaggerated motions and don"t 
grin into the camera." 

Done in pantomime, the films show such everyday occurrences as 
a wife tying a man's bow-tie. a husband helping a wife zip her dress, 
two young people reading together on a beach. In each instance, 
there's a jingle and a voice-over emphasizing that PM's are "gentle." 

"Among our contributions to these commercials was client availa- 
bility," says Greene. "It's easy to buy something from a storyboard, 
but in the medium where most of our money is spent, we feel it's 
important not to tie the producers hands with preconceived notions. 
We're right on set to okay what goes on." 

He smokes all PM brands, is quiet-spoken, weighs what he says 
carefully. He sums up his life (some four and a half decades of it i : 
"I've spent all my life in Connecticut, some 20 years with Philip 
Morris." He lives in Weston. Conn., with his wife and three children. 

As advertising director of Philip Morris & Co.. Greene works with 
a different agency for each of PM's three brands: Biow-Beirn- 
ToigO for Philip Morris. Benton & Bowles for Parliaments, Leo Bur- 
nett for Marlboro. * * * 



28 



SPONSOR 




August 1st 



Your Iowa campaign starts with Des Moines . . . state 
capital and largest city . . . the shopping and distribution 
center . . . salesmen's home base. And your Iowa 
campaign starts with KRNT-TV, the showmanship station 
with CBS shows that run away with the ratings 
sweepstakes, PLUS Central Iowa's favorite personalities 
with established audiences — and proved power 
to move merchandise! 

Face the facts! The same showmanship savvy that always 
gives you the biggest Hooper and Pulse ratings in Des 
Moines Radio is now also running the newest know-how, 
go-now operation . . . KRNT-TV. 



KATZ HAS ALL THE FACTS 

11 JULY 1955 



FULL POWER, 316,000 WATTS 



29 



BEFORE 

you buy 

television 

time 

in 

California 

look at the facts 



on 



KSBW-TV 

Channel 8 
ABC, CBS, NBC 



Exclusively 

serving 

central coast area 

of California 



Population 474,933 

Tv homes 110,879 

Spendable income $789,703,000 




CBS, NBC, ABC, DuMONT 




by Joe Csida 
Big shows to make '54-'55 specs look low budget 

As unbecoming as it may be to sneak a bow for our pre- 
dictions for last season, we just can't resist . . . just a small, 
quick one. For in a couple of areas our slightly nicked crys- 
tal ball revealed some fairly accurate glimpses into the fu- 
ture. Like, for instance, we said that television was being 
saturated with situation comedies both live and film and that 
many of these would come upon hard times. How true this 
turned out to be is indicated by just one web's fall program- 
ing line-up. At CBS TV, out of 18 shows going on the air. 
only five are situation comedies. 

We also pointed out that some of the better shows featuring 
country music would find large, loyal, sponsor-profitable 
audiences. Ozark Jubilee on ABC TV, against some really 
rugged competition, has indeed iound same to be true. 

So with a new fall upcoming we drag out our spheroid and 
dim the lights once more to see what September 1955 may 
hold. On the most elaborate and expensive program level, a 
repeat and an extension of what took place last autumn seems 
"to show clearly. Largely inspired by the eagerness, nay, the 
urgent necessitv to sell color television, the networks (and 
notably NBC TV) delivered the most spectacular, costly and 
often entertaining shows yet presented. Color, for many rea- 
sons, will require the same kind of promotion throughout 
1955 and 1956, and the result will be spectacular program- 
ing in tint to make some of the best previous efforts seem like 
low-budget productions. 

On these highest levels programing will be stimulated by 
yet another development: The current tussel between fee and 
free television. It becomes increasingly clear that the major 
video networks will try to meet toll tv's argument that free 
television can't afford to bring viewers top Broadway show 
and motion picture attractions by putting on a number of just 
such' attractions. This, it would seem, is exactly what's be- 
hind current (as of the time this is written) negotiations be- 
tween a oouple of the top webs and Alexander Korda for the 
multi-million dollar Sir Laurence Olivier production of 
"Kin°; Richard. III." This also account- for reports that 
NBC's Pat Weaver is considering bankrolling one or more 
top legit productions with the idea of presenting the opening 
night performance as a tv spectacular. There is little doubt, 
according to the visions coming through in our crystal globe, 
that fall will see acceleration of efforN in this direction. 
(Column continues page 32) 



30 



SPONSOR 



Pulse Pounds it Home: 

"Clearly Nashville's 
ill TV Station 9 ' 



Of the top 10 once-a 
>n WSM-TV." 



.week shows 



■ th.s market, 



10 are oi 



° f 'he 'op 10 multi-weekly s h 
10 are on WSM-TV. ' 



ows in this market 



Of the top 25 shows in this market. 23 are on WSr ^ TV.' 

on 'Y dominates th« 
*"* *- ft P.m. „ ".*"■ "" — Po Pu(ar TV 



Survey by The Pulse, Inc., April, 1955 






WSM-TV 

NBC-TV Affiliate • Nasi 



Channel 



e. Tennessee 



11 JULY 1955 



31 




Best 

Showplace 
In fo 

BALTIMORE 
TELEVISION 



WMAR-TV 

• • • * A 

CHANNEL Z 



ierv/ng .. 

MOST OF 

MARYLAND 

AND 

THEN^OME! 

ON MAXIMUM POWER 
TELEVISING COLOR 



SUNPAPERS TELEVISION, BALTIMORE, MD. 

Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 

New Vork Detroit, Kansas City, San Francisco, 
Chicago Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles 



i — w 



V 



SPONSOR BACKSTAGE (Continued) 

One hardly need hold a seance to see that the motion pic- 
ture industry this fall will plunge into video as it has been 
inevitable for a number of years that they would. Sparked 
by the work ABC has done in this direction, not only with the 
highly successful Walt Disney alliance, but in several other 
ways, the leading Hollywood filmmakers this autumn will 
make their greatest impact in the tv medium since its incep- 
tion. The Warner Brothers Present dramatic series and the 
MGM Parade, both slated for ABC, will only be two exam- 
ples of the celluloid capital's active participation in tv. 

Before 1 September, for example, it should surprise no one 
if, in addition to products specifically made for tv, a huge 
chunk of important theatrical film material reaches the na- 
tion's video screens. It is only a question of time before 
someone like Howard Hughes makes a deal to let loose the 
vaultfulls of feature-length films for television. And that goes 
whether the current dickering between the Hughes group and 
Tom O'Neil and Elliot Hyman pans out or not. 

It is, of course, pertinent to any preview of the fall, that 
ABC has made substantial strides toward becoming a third 
major network, in a way which no previous web has ever 
challenged CBS's and NBC's supremacy. For, in addition 
to such influencing factors on top-level programing as the 
color drive and the free vs. fee fiasco, ABC's newly developed 
first line competitive position will force meaningful changes 
in programing activities at the two long-time top nets. 

The Mickey Mouse Club full hour, for example, has long 
since stirred NBC to reevaluate and make plans for changing 
and strengthening their Howdy Doody, Pinky Lee and other 
shows. And as ABC develops power in other programing 
types, these same healthy stirrings will take place. 

Not fully appreciated in the ABC surge, and in its over-all 
influence toward better and stronger programing on all webs 
and all stations, is the American Broadcasting-Paramount 
Theatres move into the record business. NBC has long had 
its RCA Victor division, and CBS its Columbia records, and 
while there is no direct operational tie between network oper- 
ations and record activities, programing is quite frequently 
and favorably effected by the family relationship. Apart 
from corporate kinships it has become increasingly apparent 
that the record-music business and the television business can 
aid and abet one another with ideas, promotion, etc. 

Our crystal ball shows a clear picture of ABC, with its new 
record division, making substantial contributions in this area, 
too, toward better programing. 

And talking of records, we believe the fall will find disk 
jockeys moving more strongly into the national programing 
picture than ever before. CBS's deal with Chicago's greatly 
talented Howard Miller (with his radio web show kicking off 
18 July, to be followed by tv later) will go a long way toward 
proving the soundness of program of this genre. 

We have run out of space, so some of the pretty pictures in 
our glass globe will have to hold, but the wrap-up vision 
which appears to us for the fall is that advertisers and agen- 
cies will have a greater choice of more strong and exciting 
programs than they've ever had before. 



• • • 



32 



SPONSOR 



Radio in Baltimore is 





The only way to reach every family in the 
Baltimore Trading Area is by radio. Radio offers 
98.6% penetration of the whole Baltimore met- 
ropolitan area. No other advertising medium of- 
fers anything like this penetration. The only way 
to get your message to everybody is radio! Yes!— 

Radio in Baltimore is 





And the big bargain buy in Baltimore radio is 
W-l-T-H. Top Nielsen circulation in the home 
county goes to W-l-T-H. Combined with low, 
low rates, W-l-T-H delivers more listeners-per- 
dollar than any other radio or TV station in Balt- 
imore. Ask your Forjoe man for the whole story! 

IN BALTIMORE BUY 




Tom Tinsley, President 



R. C Embry, Vice President 



11 JULY 1955 



National Representatives: Forjoe &. Co. 



33 




agency profile 



Theodore J. Grunewald 



Radio-+v director 
Hicks & Greist, New York 



There may come a time in the near future when Ted Grunewald, 
Hicks & Greist radio-tv director, will earn the title among admen as 
"the agencyman willing to handle almost anything."' 

For one thing, he helped cook up a scheme involving a three-ton 
elephant which trampled all over a clients product for some demon- 
stration tv commercials (Sandran floor covering). 

"Our aim is to be undismayed," Grunewald told sponsor, then 
went on to mention some of the recent events at Hicks & Greist that 
hes taken in stride. "About a year and a half ago, when I joined 
the agency, our air billings were $100,000. As of last month, we've 
been billing at the rate of $2.1 million, with a good chance we'll 
hit a $3 million total in air media for the year." 

The rapid expansion of the agency's air media business keeps him 
hopping to and from studios and around the country to stations 
when time clearance or production problems arise. Grunewald does 
hope to be in or near his Briarwood. Queens, home in October, 
when he turns 31. He lives there with his wife and baby daughter. 

Hicks & Greist air clients range from network tv sponsors, like 
Dixie Cup Co., with Super Circus, ABC TV I alternate Sundays 
5:30-6:00 p.m. I to network radio clients like Glamorene, [Arthur 
Godfrey, CBS Radio, Fridays 10:15-10:30 a.m. I Also. Glamorene, 
Sandran. Broil Quick. Servel are heavy users of spot radio and tv. 

"Today radio is a better buy than it's ever been," Grunewald 
says. "And often strong independents are the best buys. Currently 
Fm very interested to see the effect of Monitor. It could easily 
change the whole structure of radio programing." 

To him the most important trend in television is the rivalry be- 
tween the networks and various programing innovations emerging 
as a result. He feels "set penetration wont warrant color for a 
while in my opinion," but added that the agency is currently 
making a new Glamorene animated cartoon commercial in color to 
studv color's potentialities. "That boosts the cost by 20' j ,"' Grune- 
wald notes, "but we feel the expected long life of the commercial 
warrants it. Besides, we'll show it at sales meetings and possiblv 
in theaters." * * * 



SPONSOR 




** 





& 



It's Christmas in July, September, 
January and all through the year for your 

product and market with TV's freshest, 
most exciting new variety revue . . . SHOWTIME. 



'£**->*" 



All tied up and ready for delivery . . . 
An exciting and startling new experience in TV musicals. 



The greatest array of "BIG NAME" talent ever assembled for local and 

regional sponsorship . . . the biggest 30 minutes in television. Reads like a 
who's who in Show Business and delivers an entertainment package unmatched 

in television today. Every week a brilliant new star-studded cast works 
for you, delivering great songs, hilarious comedy, top orchestral arrangements and 
thrilling dance routines . . . Stars like : Teresa Brewer, Ralph Flanagan, 

Peggy Lee, Tennessee Ernie, the De Castro Sisters, Frankie Carle 
and many more great audience names, all M.C.'d by TV's newest comic sensation . . . 



U *T4* tOi 



Here's a show you've been waiting for ... a show of 
top network calibre kept within a low budget for 
local and regional sponsors. 

SHOWTIME is BIG TIME ... in every way but cost, 
combining all the elements that build high ratings and sizzle 
sponsors' sales upward. 

SHOWTIME is YOUR TIME to act .. .for 39 great shows! 

Do your Christmas shopping now ! 

For complete details write, wire, phone or mail the 
attached coupon for all facts today. 

| STUDIO FILMS, INC. 

Producers and Distributors of Television Films 

380 Madison Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. 
Phone: OXford 7-2590 



Mail to: 

STUDIO FILMS, INC., 380 Madison Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. 



.Title 



-Zone State. 



Markets interested in: 



t 





pro 



.1 Ilj Willi L 



IP ID) 



WHJ „ 



JJJI 



I? A 



M ntip it top sprt 

Chart covers half-hour syndicated film programs 











J 


[ 


»asr 


Top 10 shows in 1 or more markets 
Period 7-7 May 7955 

TITIE. SYNDICATOR. PRODUCER SHOW TVPf 


Average 
rating 


7STAT10N 
MARKETS 

NY LA 


5STATI0N 
MARKETS 


4-STATI0N MARKETS 


S-STATic", 
MARKFTC 


I 


•ank 


Boston Mipls. S. Fran 


Seattle- 

Atlanta Chicago Detroit Taeoma Wash 


Bait Buffalo CilW. 


- 


1 


I Fed Throe Lives, Ziv (D) 


22.6 


5.4 73.9 

wabc iv kttv 
9:00pm 


30.5 24.4 78.4 

kstD-tt kron-tv 
7:00pm 1 10 30pm 


76.4 75.5 25.5 76.9 77.7 

wsb-tv wgn tv wjbk-tv ktnt-tv 

9:30pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 


74.5 37.5 27.5 

whal-tv wben-tv wlw-t 
'i 7:30p; 


7 


Budge 711. NBC Film (D) 


21.8 


5.9 782 

km 
: 10pm 


22.3 24.7 25.9 

■ lv kpll 
fi :30pm 9:30pm 


75.9 27.2 25.7 75.2 

wgn-tv wvrj-tv kl 

3 'i n 10:00pm 9:30pm 7 DO 


72.9 78.4 

wbal-tv wcr-iv 
10:30pm 10:30pm 


. 


6' 


Mr. Bistriet Attorney, Ziv (a) 


20.6 


5.8 73.7 

k \t 
10:30pm 10:00pm 


79.5 34.2 20.0 

wnae-tv kstp-tv krnn-tv 
10:30pm 9:30pm 10 30pm 


78.9 7 7.9 20.7 22.7 7 7.5 

\n iv wbkb wwj-tv Une-tv »nul ti 
7:00pm 8:30pm 9:30pm 9:00pm M 


73.2 79.9 76.5 

wbal-tv ivgr-tv wlw-l 
Ipm 7 "»pm 9:30pi 




3 


Waterfront, MCA Roland Reed (A) 


18.7 


6.7 23.7 

ktlv 
: 30pm 7:30pm 


70.0 25.2 

kcvil IV 1 

7 niipm 8:30pm 


22.4 78.7 73.7 

uaca-tv komn-tv wtOTJ tv 
9 30pm "I'm i<» 30pm 


76.2 24.0 9.3 

wmar-tv ugr-tv wcno-l 
10:30iuii 7UUpm 3 :30pl 






Lone Wolf. UTP, Gross-Krasne (D) 


18.1 


5.4 

kttv 
i 30pm 


77.4 20.5 

wnac-tv weeo-tv 
11 30pm 3 :i0pm 


76.8 70.9 

king-tv 

Opm 9:00pm 


73.5 

nkrc-' 
10:30p 






Wrni Behind the Badge, MCA-TV Film (Doc) 


1 7.9 


6.6 8.7 

webs ti kttv 
G !0pm 3:30pm 




76.9 6.2 

wjbk-tv wmal-tv 
9:30pm l» 30pm 


20.4 

utrr-tv 
10:30pm 






Citg Detective, MCA, Revue Prod. (D) 


J 7.8 


9.6 73.8 

" ■ iv. knxt 

11 1 ':u,i l -in 


24.2 75.7 

kstp-tv kron ft 
8:30pm 10:00pm 


79.5 6.7 79.0 7.7 

cklw-tv king-tv wmal-tv 
10:30pm 10:30pm 8:30pm 9:00pm 


76c 

wkrc-l 
9 :30pi 




8 


Superman. Flamingo, R. Maxwell (K) 


17.2 


70.3 72.2 

wrca-tv kttv 
G 00pm 7:00pm 


78.5 78.3 76.0 

wnac-tv \\ ten -U fego-ti 
6 :30pm 5 :30pm 6 30pm 


76.9 74.0 74.3 78.2 75.7 

wsb-tv vsbkb wzyz-tv king-tv ur, tv 
7 00pm 5:00pm 5:30pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 


78.9 22.5 7.5 

wbal-tv wben-tv wepo-t 
mi 7:00pm ll:00p 




9 


Fiherace, Guild Films (Mu.) 


17.0 


5.8 8.7 

wrca ti kttv 
6 30pm 3:30pm 


7.0 73.5 26.0 

ti ween-tv k'M\ 
8:30pm 8:00pm 0:30pm 


2.2 73.7 8.9 27.7 

wlw-i wgn-tv wwj-tv king-tv 
8:00pm 9:30pm 10:30pm 8:30pm 


74.9 23.8 7 7.2 

wbal-tv wgr-tv wcpo-l 
7:00pm fi :30pm 6 :30pi 




10 


Cisco Kiel. Ziv (W) 


16.9 


2.8 77.7 

kttv 
6:30pm 6:i 


73.2 74.4 20.4 

u I 00 tv k* ',11 -IV 

fi :00->m 6 :30pm 8 :30pm 


76.9 9.5 9.4 78.3 

- aea-tv wbkb h xvz-ti h imo-tv 
:i, i :00pm 7 00pm 7 00pm 


76.9 77.0 76.7 

wbal-tv wben-tv urpo-i 
7:00pm 7:00pm 5:0^ 




ut' 
• a* 


Top 70 shows in 4 to 9 markets 


■ 




Passport to Banger, ABC Film, Hal Roach (A' 


21.9 


7.3 

kcop 

- mi;.,, 


9.7 74.7 

keyd-tv k r on-tv 
7:30pm 10 


77.5 

king-tv 
1" 00pm 


20.5 

wlw-t 
9:00pi 


" 


3 


Lift* of B'.ley. NBC Film, Tom McKnight (C) 


21.1 


72.0 

kttv 


20.7 20.4 

kstp-tv kgo-tv 

9:00pm 7:00pm 


76.0 29.9 

wgn-tv king-tv 
9:00pm 7 30pm 






I 


Foreign intrigue. Sheldon Reynolds (A) 


J 9.0 


3.3 70.4 

10:30pm 11 Ipm 


23.7 

wbz-tv 

10:30pm 


73.7 

Wtcip-tV 

; OOpm 








Gin/ Fomhardo. MCA-TV Film, Guy Lonbardo 
Films Inc. (Mu) 


17.3 


9.8 5.2 

k " ' v 
7 imp, ii 9:00pm 




4.0 

cklw-tv 

8:30pm 








Mayor of the Town, MC*-TV FSIr>. Gross 

Krasne (D) 


17.1 




9.3 

keyd tv 
7 30pm 


70.2 27.4 73.5 

wnbq 

i phi in -OOpm 








Favorite Story. Ziv (D) 


16.3 




9.2 

kron-tv 
6 30pm 


79.2 74.7 

u aga t\ n fbfe tv 
9 :300m 






•J 


Tll«> Whistler, CBS Film, Joel Malone (M) 


!.>..> 


75.7 

kttv 

10:00pm 


72.2 27.7 

wbz-tt 

i i >m 


74.0 78.4 

vv ilik-tv king-tv 

1" 30pm 1 pin 


70.0 

wmar-tr 
ii :00pm 






.Slur und the Storg, Official Films, Inc. (D) 


14.6 


70.7 

km 


79.9 

k',,n tv 

: oopo 


73.2 72.4 

,' sb tv wwj ■ iv 
"!>m 






B 


Dong. Fairbanks Presents. ABC Films (D) 


13.5 


73.8 7 7.3 

u',;i tv k'i.1 

10:30pm 1" 30pm 


73.4 

kstp-tv 

10 :30pm 


75.3 

ktnt-tv 
10pm 




" 


7 


The Falcon, NBC Film (D) 


13.0 


7.8 

k ill 
10:30pm 


7.9 

keyd-tv 
: OOprn 


6.7 77.3 

■ kh\ tv king iv 
m 9:00pm 


79.0 

wben-tv 

10 :30pm 




!> 


Gene Autry, CBS Film (W) 


13.0 


6.3 

kcop 

7 Till 


77.7 2.7 

wnac-ti kovi 

ii:00pm • "in | 


20.7 

klng-tv 

"phi 




Show type symbols: (A) adventure; (C) comedy; (D) drama: (Doc) documentary; <K> kids; May. While, network 


.in- fairly stable 1 1 ••in • nc month to another in the markets In 


- 




(Ml mystery; i.mu) musical; c\v) Western. Ftlrai listed are synd 
telecast In four ot more markets. The average rating Is an unwelght 
market ratings listed above. Blank space Indicates film not broadc 


lcated, half-hour length. which they are shown, this i 
ed average of Individual be borne In mind when analy- 
ast In this market 1-7 to last month's chart If bla 


s true to much lesser extent with syndicate 
ing rating trends from one month to another 
nk, show was not rated at all in last chart 


d shows. This should 
In thlJ chart. 'Refers 
or was In other than 


■ 
1 

! 
I 



I 



1 



HI SMI 




CUve Columbui Mllw 



specially made for tv 



(STATION HAKKIK 



79.5 23.4 25.2 7 7.4 22.9 



M V. I 









OOpm 



1 i.ii 



27.9 

vuih<l 

; DOpm 



6.5 18.4 23.7 












9.9 23.7 22.4 70.2 79.7 



in SOpm 



win ,■ 
:• 80pm 



vvfiui rv 









19.4 16.0 









13.9 

■ 



74.7 20.0 



Utvtl tV 
1 Pill 



11 OOpm 



30.4 



9.4 77.5 









74.7 24 7 9.5 22.7 



ulvv .■ 
II iMli.in 



u \i\ 



Mill 

7 ihiiiiii 



k..l iv 
B 15pm 



9.2 76.9 7.2 79.9 78.5 



wnhk 
| "Hi'"- 



wbm-lv 
6 :00pm 



wtvw 
fi :30pra 



wrau-tT 
7 OOpm 



k..l tv 
6:00pm 



21.0 15.4 27.4 70.7 77.5 



WfVH 

9 :00pm 



vihn- tv 

lo 30pm 



Willi I TV 
7 INlpill 



kid '> 
1" OOpn 



73.3 77.8 



vv Ivv r 

-. OOpn 



wfmi t\ 

I 30pm 



75.9 

-. OOpm 



I I I A I III N UAKK! "• 



II. I'll 


Char li.ttf 


D i.l.-n 


Mr. Of 


30.8 


62 


26.5 












36.0 


57.5 


22.0 






vvl.'v 


whlo u 






59.8 


27.8 


29.8 


35 5 


vvhlv 


vvlvv ,1 


tfdsu H 


25.5 




pm 








27.0 






40.8 










28.8 




34.8 








vvhlo If 










45.0 








Vl.l-ll tv 

11 OOpm 


23.8 


32.3 


13.8 


32.8 


.. OOpm 




\> !vv i| 

"• OOpm 


wdiu tv 
5:00pm 


27.3 






52.3 


1 OOpm 






wd»u tv 



56.3 



72.5 



27.4 



14.4 

10 OOpm 



73.0 

7 "i>i>iii 



73.0 73.0 

vvntz k-.l If 

10:30pm 



22.2 

'.> DOpm 



78.5 

wnbk 
7:00pm 



J7.7 

oriel 
li> SOpm 



78.9 

ksd tv 
!> :30pm 



70.7 

w t Wi 

5 OOpm 



75.5 79.4 

wpiz kwk-tf 
in OOpm 



46.8 20.0 47.5 



54.3 



50.0 



39.5 

1 rpm 



74.3 



78.0 

wbrr-tv 



72.0 

U hv-il 



78.0 

* :30pm 



lop 10. Classification as to number of stations In market Is Pulse's own. 
Pulse determines number by measuring which stations are actually re- 
ceiTed by homes in the metropolitan urea of a given market even though 
nation itself may be outside metropolitan area of the market 




WNOU'TV |]f$ 



THE NOTRE DAME STATION 




Primary 
Affiliate 
Serving 



SOUTH BEND-ELKHART 



Here 's WNDU-TV's all UHF market 

FAMILIES 206,600 

RETAIL SALES $783,927,000 

SETS 169,000 UHF equipped 

An "ISLAND" Market . . . in an exclusively UHF area. 

FIRST in per capita income in Indiana 
SECOND largest population in Indiana 
THIRD highest home ownership in U.S. 

Call MEEKER TV for Availabilities! 



WKOU'TV 




CHICAGO 

230 N. Michigan Ate. 

Franklin 2-6373 



• 



Today, advertisers judge good and bad advertising in terms of sales results. 
National Spot Radio can get sales — and not stop with building consumer demand 
or gaining good will. We have the Formula For Selling Americans Today that 
demonstrates "how" to use the medium. 

This presentation has proved so exciting that many top agencies and 
advertisers have arranged meetings with their management men, plans boards, 
account executives and creative staffs, as well as their media people. And a great 
many have asked for repeat performances, for further inspiration and study! 




If you know how to use it 



We want to show you "how" — with our new 
Formula For Selling Americans Today. We're ready 
to demonstrate, individually or in group meetings 
with planning and creative people — as soon as \ou 
give the word. Why not call or write us today? 



EAST, SOUTHEAST 

WBZ+WBZA 

WGR 
KYW 

KDKA 
WFBL 



Boston • Springfield 51,000 

Buffalo 5.000 

Philadelphia 50,000 

Pittsburgh 50,000 

Syracuse 5,000 




wese 


Charleston, S 


C. 


5,000 


WIST 


Charlotte 




5,000 


WIS 


Columbia, S. 


C. 


5,000 


WPTF 


Raleigh — Dui 


ham 


50,000 


WDBJ 


Roanoke 




5,000 


MIDWEST, SOUTHWEST 






WHO 


Des Moines 




50.000 


woe 


Davenport 




5,000 


WDSM 


Duluth — Superior 


5,000 


WDAY 


Fargo 




5,000 


WOWO 


Fort Wayne 




50,000 


WIRE 


Indianapolis 




5,000 


KMBC-KFRM 


Kansas City 




5.000 


KFAB 


Omaha 




50.000 


WMBD 


Peoria 




5,000 



Beaumont 5,000 

Corpus Christi 1,000 

Ft. Worth— Dallas 50,000 

San Antonio 50,000 



MOUNTAIN AND WEST 

KBOI Boise 5,000 

KVOD Denser 5,000 

KGMB-KHBC Honolulu— Hilo 5,000 

Kf X Portland 50.000 

KIRO Seattle 50,000 



DETROIT 

Penobscot Bldg. 

Woodward 1-4255 



ATLANTA 

Glenn Bldg. 

Main 5667 



FT. WORTH 

406 W. Seventh St. 

Fortune 3349 



HOLLYWOOD 

633/ Hollywood Bltd. 

Hollywood 9-2151 



5AN FRANCISCO 
Run Building 
Sutler l-3"98 



f. ISlew stations on air* 



OITY & 8TATI 



CALL 
LETTERS 



i CHANNEL 
NO 



ON-AIR 
DATE 



ERP (kw>" Antenni NET 

Visual | («)••• I AFFILIATION 



STN8. 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 
MARKET* 

(Onni 



PERMITEE. MANAGER. REP 



DES MOINES, IOWA 



KRNT-TV 



20 June 



316 



623 



CBS 



WHO-TV 302 000 Cowtol Hrastg Co.. Kitz 

" nu ' T " i,vvu Owned b] Krister & Tribune Co. 

(Jardner Cowles. pres. 

Bobert Dillon, r.p. 



ff. \ew roust r if ct ion permits* 



CITY & STATE 



CALL 
LETTERS 



CHANNEL DATE OF GRANT ERP(kw)« 

NO. Visual 



Antenna 
(It)'" 



STATIONS 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 

MARKETt 

(000) 



PERMITEE, MANAGER. RADIO REP1 



CARLSBAD, N. M. 1 



22 June 



1.43 



382 



None 



kiCA Carlsbad Bcstg Corp. 

Val Lawrence, pres. 
Norman R. Loose, v. p. & trea 



Tar lor 



Iff. Vetr applications 



CITY 4 STATE 



CHANNEL 
NO. 



DATE 
FILED 



ERP (kw) 1 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)"* 



ESTIMATED 
COST 



ESTIMATED 

1ST YEAR 

OP. EXPENSE 



TV STATIONS 
IN MARKET 



APPLICANT, AM AFFILIATE 



CHEBOYGAN, MICH. 



20 June 



5.16 



434 



$88,406 



$43,990 



None 



Midwestern Bcstg Co. 
Les Biederman, pres. 



BOX SCORE 



U. S. stations on air 
Markets covered 



V. S. tv sets (1 June '55) 

I . S. ti homes (1 June '55) 



420 
252% 
.{(,.100.000 
34,200,0001 



•Both new tp.'s and stations going on the air listed here are those which occurred between 
2 June and 16 June or on which information could be obtained Jn that period. Stations are 
considered to be on the air when commercial operation starts. "Effective radiated power. Aural 
power usually is one-half the visual power. •••Antenna height above average terrain (oat 
above ground), tlnformation on the number of sets in markets where not designated u beta* 
fmm NEC Research, ronsists of estimates from the stations or reps and must be deemed approxl- 
rnatp. SData from NBC Research and Planning. flln most cases, the representatives of a radio 
station which is granted a c.p. also represents the new tv operation. Since at presstlme It 1* 
generally too early to confirm tv representatives of most grantees, SPONSOR list* the reps of 
th** radi<» stations in this column (when a radio station has been given the tv grant). NFA: No 
figures available at presstime on sets in market. iNo construction will commence until antenna 
site and structure are approved for air navigation safety. '-Will pick up and rebroadcast pro- 
grams of WPBN-TV, Traverse City. 



Demonstrate the Product, We Always Say 




Channel 5— ABC 

100,000 Watts 

BLAIR TV 



And who can make a better pitch for 
U.S. Keds than the pooch that delights 
half a million kids on Seattle's most 
popular afternoon TV strip, KING'S 
CLUBHOUSE WITH STAN BORESON? 

To get extra sell into KING-TV 
campaigns, we insist on talent tie-ins with 
client products. KING-TV personalities 
provide a big plus. They've had a five-year 
headstart on the competition — and they 
work before Seattle's largest TV audience. 

So, whether you're selling tennis shoes 
or toothpaste, the place to go is 
KING-TV. In the Pacific Northwest, 
that's where sales begin. 



FIRST IN SEATTLE 



KiNG-TV 



40 



SPONSOR 



The Only 

MAXIMUM POWER 

Station Between 

DALLAS AND MEMPHIS 423 miles 

TULSA AND NEW ORLEANS - - 553 miles 




NEW 
ORLEANS 



Represented by 
VENARD, RINTOUL and McCONNELL. Inc. 

Walter M. Windsor, General Manager 



EVERY DAY 



EVERY WEEK 






\7 



EVERY MONTH 



*GyirTir s 



ntitiu 



au ««ie 1 ,ce 



e s to 



I 
I 
I 

I 

I 
I 

i 
1 



gl-Oiv 



i 

I 

1 i 



and 



*The average audience is increasing with 
each report. According to Telepulse, KGUL- 
TV's share of audience . . . sign on to sign 
off . . . increased 15.3% in May over April 
1955. 

(Telepulse, Houston-Galveston Metropolitan Area May 1955) 

NOW-MORE THAN EVER-THE 
BEST BUY IN TEXAS' 



HI 



[it 



teuiW 



I 
1 

r 





GULF TELEVISION COMPANY GALVESTON, TEXAS 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
CBS TELEVISION SPOT SALES 



42 



SPONSOR 



1 JULY 
1935 



NOW TO USE FALL FACTS BASICS 

HERE'S ^<>l i; <,i im TO 9TH \NM M BRIEFING ISS1 I 



TOP ARTICLES appear in immediately following pages. The) include 

which for fn-t time reveals -|«>i tv .m<l radio expenditures of majoi adv< 
ii|>- dm lall buying horn network and representative firm heads; an ana 
local radio and t\ programing. For lull description see PAGE I 



SECTIOh 



SECTIO\ 



SECTION 



SECTION 



SECTION 




(Tiny 



1 

2 

3 
4 

5 
6 



TELEVISION: This is your over-all look at both of the video medio, spot and network, 
including complete fall network tv lineup. Section starts PAGE 43 





TELEVISION BASICS: Compiled in an 1 1 -page section are the key statistics which 
sum up the size and cost of tv, 1955. Section starts PAGE 113 

FILM BASICS: You'll find facts here on the extent film is used; audience for reruns; 
plus tips on buying syndicated film shows. Section starts PAGE 133 

RADIO: The over-all picture in spot and net radio, including buying trends in spot 
radio; analysis of fall network programing. Section starts PAGE 133 

RADIO BASICS: Charted in 13 pages, latest facts on radio's size and* reach; costs 
compared with other media; spot, net billings. Section starts PAGE 1S3 




TIMEBUYING BASICS: A book within a book of 40,000 words, condensing the 
13 seminars held under the auspices of RTES, New York. Section starts. . PAGE 109 



FOR SUMMARY OF THE TOP TRENDS REVEALED IN THE 304 PAGES OF FALL FACTS BASICS, TURN PAGE 



The '211 TOP TBS this fall 

Those* arc major developments digested from 304-page Fall Facts Basics 



This is your over-all look at fall television and radio as digested from 
SI ONSOR's coverage of each of the air media divisions. It's designed 
to give you a quick briefing on developments reported in this biggest 
issue of SPONSOR'S history. Previous page shows complete contents. 



SPOT TV TRENDS 

i Com pit ii /■' port starts /<".</' <'> t i 



1. Nighttime tv is tighter than 
ever. New tv stations have been add- 
ed but not enough to ease the squeeze 
in most of the major markets which 
advertisers crowd. Furthermore, high- 
grade network programing resulting 
from the rivalry between the webs, 
among other factors, has attracted a 
rush of new clients into nighttime spot 
television, adding to pressure. 

2. I.D.^s are more popular than 
they have been, because they can 
still be cleared during Class "A" time. 
However, even I.D.'s are getting tight. 
Another popular buy today is minutes 
and 20-second announcements during 
the evening hours just preceding and 
following network option time. 

3. Film commercial trend is to- 
ward live action. There's a notice- 
able trend back to live-action film 
commercials using limited number of 
actors, as contrasted with big rush to 
animated cartoons that followed the 
S AG reuse payment agreement of 1953. 

4. A U.S. tv set count is under- 
way, expected to he complete by 
early fall. The U.S. Census has un- 
dertaken this job for ARF, will deter- 
mine the number of tv sets in the 
homes surveyed for census purposes 
Networks and TvB are footing the bill. 
But this won't <;i\e admen the facts 
the) need on sets within each duii'mI: 
census will break set penetration down 
by regions only. NARTB, however, is 
working hard to get it- long-planned 
set count and circulation study under- 



way and that will prov ide market-b) 
market figures. 

5. Syndicated film is $60 million 
business. Despite heavy competition, 
sale of film produced for tv as well as 
features has shot up. ( For coverage 
of film in addition to Spot tv section. 
see Film Basics, page 133.) 



NETWORK TV TRENDS 

(Complete report starts page 86) 



J, Programing developments are 
highlighted by decline of situation 
comedies and rise in outdoor ad- 
venture shows. These two nighttime 
trends are joined by two others which 
started last season and are being con- 
tinued this fall, namely, more 90-min- 
ute extravaganzas and shows produced 
by movie studios. In daytime tv, the 
outstanding program developments are 
the lessening importance of soap op- 
eras, and the increasing importance of 
personality-type shows. 

2. Clearances are improving. 

Among the top 100 markets, 25 have 
gained or will gain over the summer 
an additional station as compared with 
last September. But full competition 
between the three major networks in 
the top 100 markets is still not possi- 
ble. Only 23 of them have three or 
more vhf or three or more uhf sta- 
tions. Washington is tackling the diffi- 
cult allocations problem through ex- 
pert committees and hearings to see 
how much de-intermixture of uhf-vhf 
markets can be accomplished. 



3. Costs are continuing to rise. 

ibis is a result of increasing set sat- 
uration, competition between the net- 
works for stars, rising program pro- 
duction and union scales, hut the fact 
advertisers are waiting in line to ^et 
in testifies to the effectiveness of tv 
and the fact that its cost-per-1,000 is 
competitive with other media. 

4. More alternate-week sponsor- 
ships feature buying trends. With 

buying not quite finished for the fall, 
there are 66 alternate-week sponsor- 
ships scheduled. In October last year 
there were 58 alternate-week sponsor- 
ships. Single show 7 sponsorships have 
gone down from 83 last year to 60 so 
far this coming season. 

5. Major programing changes are 
underway, particularly on CBS TV. 
(For complete charts of fall nighttime 
and daytime network television line- 
ups, see pages 90-95 I . 



SPOT RADIO TRENDS 

(Complete report starts pagt 154 I 



Z. Morning-only buying is giving 
ivay to more balanced approach. 

Advertisers this fall are showing will- 
ingness to hu\ all time periods in 
many cases. Nighttime radio has been 
made more attractive through rate re- 
ductions and admen are less concerned 
with television competition. What's 
being considered today is just what the 
radio buy itself delivers rather than 
what's going on in tv at the same time. 

2. Biiyers view spot radio as bet- 
ter buy now than it's ever been 
if it's used creatively. Many of the 
points sellers of time have been mak- 
ing over past seasons are beginning to 
be reflected in views of buyers i see 
quotes from buyers in text and dis- 
plav of spot radio pages). 



44 



SPONSOR 



.'>'. SpeciaHwed programing < ontin- 

ih's to grow. Negro, Mexican-Amei 
ican .in- probabl} fastest grow ing spe- 
cialties. Negro programing ia carried 
l>\ ,(i least 596 stal iona ilii- ) eai . 

/. SPONSOR predicts spot radio 
billings will continue rising. Based 
on it- research in ea< li branch "I the 
.in media, sponsor in this issue makes 
predictions "I trends underwaj and 

trends I me, Ine indications ai c 

^|)nt radio will continue growth which 
has can ied through t\ - big surge. 

5, Stations have revamped pro- 
graming structures to coincide 
nil It listening habits. There are 
more service packages "I news, traf- 
fic and weather reports. Emphasis on 
local and regional news continues. 



NETWORK RADIO TRENDS 

/■/, (( ,-, port starts pagt 170) 



/. Buying patterns are becoming 

more flexible. The flexibilih offered 
b) network radio ran be divided into 

three types: lit a greater variet) in 
the length of announcements, (2) flex- 
il>ilit\ in the size of station lineups, 
i 3 i more chances for "scatter bu) ing." 

2. Changes in programing will he 
featured by tiro contrary trends, 
long shows and strips. Both trends 
permit sale ol low-cost short units. 

'.i. Advertisers tire less interested 
in single-show sponsorships and 
more interested in cumulative au- 
diences. The decline in listening dur- 
ing am one period of time i- reason. 

i. \ew rale cards uill stress the 
single rate. Actually, the single rate 

had been in effect but had been hidden 
1>\ complicated discounts. U$C has 
had single gross rate since lasl /ear, 
Mutual instituted single uro-s rate and 
single discount on 1 July. (IBS has 
worked out single rate card. NBC is 
expected to follow suit. 

5. yeticorks are still experiment- 
ing with a variety of program 
ideas. \\\{. is seeking answers through 
research; CBS i- stressing stars, i- al- 
so showing interest in dj.'s; MBS i- 
starting shows to give the web a "per- 
sonality"; NBC maj adapt the Moni- 
tor concept to weekdays. * * * 



i mn.i< \\t I \Ol I I ION 

Situation comedy trend touched 
off by CBS TV "I Love Lucy" 
is waning even though "Lucy' 
i t sol f stayed on top this past 
season. Imitators clogged air, 
were dropped left and right 
this year. For comments on 
next fall s tv programing see 
columns, pages 16 and 32, 
and Net tv starting page 86. 



WEEKEND K\I>1<> 

"Monitor," new NBC Radio 
weekend-long program, puts 
spotlight on weekends. It 
spurs trend already underway 
to sell weekends harder. In 
picture executives of Miller 
Brewing and its agency fete 
"Monitor" announcement buy. 
(L. to r.) Vernon S. Mullen, 
Jr., ad mgr.; Edward Ball 
Mathisson, Milwaukee; George 
W. Diefenderfer, central div. 
mgr. radio net sales, NBC; 
Carle Rollins, NBC salesman; 
George Gill, Miller r-tv exec. 




FIRST HI MM. TEX I 

Over past season admen and 
industry executives made im- 
cortant contributions to field 
of timebuying with talks before 
RTES Timebuying and Selling 
Seminar. Show after 12th ses- 
sion are Gordon Gray, WOR 
v.p., moderator; Dan Denen- 
holi, research & sales promo- 
tion head, Kati Agency; Max- 
well Ule, research v.p., K&E. 
(They discussed ARF ratings 
report.) At right, Claude Bar- 
rere, chairman RTES seminar 
committee. 40,000-word digest 
of seminars starts page 209. 



ffffifflK 




11 JULY 1955 



45 



TELEVISION AND RADIO 




ABC President Robert E. Kintner 
suggests advertisers increase air 
spending, warns them not to for- 
gel radio's efficienc) and economy 




MiC President Sylvester I.. Weav- 
er urges radio-tv combination buys 
like "Color Spread" for excite- 
ment and "Monitor" for repetition 



TEL 




J. J. Van Volkenburg, president, 
CBS TV, notes that never before 
ha\e advertisers invested in net- 
work t\ so early in the season 



"My advice to admen on fall Inning" 

Tv and radio presidents offer variety of tips on two changing media 



For greater clarity, sponsor arranged comments (and portraits above) 
of network presidents according to those heading both radio and tv 
webs, those heading tv only, those heading radio only. In their 
statements they speak as salesmen to buyers of radio and tv time. 



TELEVISION AND RADIO 

A 



Robert E. Kintner, president ABC: 
If I were an advertiser. I would, in 
the coming season, do what most na- 
tional advertisers are doing — raise the 
proportion of my advertising budget 
invested in broadcast media. But, un- 
like many advertisers, I would make 
certain that a fair share of my total 
network broadcast budget was ear- 
marked for network radio. In allocat- 
ing a balanced radio and television 
budget I would be following the lead 
of some of the country's leading ad- 
vertisers — the Carnation Co.. General 
Mills. Pabst Brewing Co.. Firestone 
Tire & Rubber Co., General Motors, to 
cite a few — and thus assure the great- 
est return on my broadcast investment. 
One mistake manv advertisers make 
is not buying radio, or buying radio 
as an afterthought, with the result that 
they make a network radio investment 



way out of line with the television 
buys. Television has so quickly be- 
come the dominant national advertis- 
ing medium that many advertisers 
tend to think that tv takes care of all 
their broadcast needs — and in so do- 
ing overlook the size, economy, effi- 
ciency and flexibility that make net- 
work radio such a perfect complement 
to network television. 

In television, the basic problem is 
not how much to buy, but rather how 
to buy most wisely. For maximum 
cost efficiency. I would invest in one 
or more regular weekly or alternate- 
week programs, rather than a costly 
once-a-month "spectacular." Mv rea- 
soning is this: The average half-hour 
program is about 50' '< more efficient 
in homes reached per commercial min- 
ute per dollar invested than spectacu- 
lars, which are at best luxury pur- 
chases. Moreover, in four weeks the 
typical half-hour television program 
delivers over 28.000.000 home visits 



compared with 11,659,000 for a spec- 
tacular. 

The regular program offers greater 
frequency and continuity, steady "pro- 
mot-ability," greater impact and spon- 
sor identification. I would carefully 
consider these sound, durable values, 
as opposed to the almost hypnotic ap- 
peal of the "splash." 

One other factor I would consider 
as an advertiser. I would not buy a 
television program or franchise be- 
cause of the "label" it bore. No net- 
work has a corner on the market for 
sound network television buys. The 
mere fact that there will be so many 
new programs premiering this fall on 
all networks would indicate to me that 
I should certainly shop all networks. 
Failing that. I might be investing in 
"pasts" rather than in "futures." 



TELEVISION AND RADIO 

A 



Sylvester L. Weaver, 



presi 



dent 



NBC: Advertising people this fall will 
again be hard at work cutting through 
masses of resistant data to get at the 
hard core of results. But what results 



46 



SPONSOR 




IY<I Bergmann, managing diret 
or, l)ii Mont, -.i\- every-week 

■Imw I- -till basic n> iv, Bees li\.- 
\ ~h>>\\ - on i li<- wa\ out fast 



i: \ 



will \ou l>c looking for? Do you want 
the kind iif excitement thai gets your 
product talked about in millions ol 
homes? Do \<>u want to build your 
prestige an ong opinion-forming, lead- 
ership groups? Do you want to gal- 
vanize \our dealer organizations 1>\ 
underlining your ad program with 
flashes of color'.'' 

Whether you want any one of these 
results, or all of them, or still others 
besides, you will need a flexible ser- 
vice which ran be shaped exactly to 
your needs. We at NBC helie\e we 
have the answer in a new concept call- 
ing for the combined use of television 
and radio for the maximum advertis- 
ing effectiveness and efficiency. 

I his thinking is a natural outgrowth 
of two other developments in sales pat- 
terns. The first of these is the Color 
Spread, which we developed this year 
as we realized what a powerhouse we 
have in color. We planned Color 
Spread for use this fall as an extension 
ol our magazine concepl which would 
permit both targe and small advertis- 
ers to gel in on the impact of color 
and the spectaculars. The second con- 
cept is Monitor, out weekend radio 

service, which offers the most flexible 
sales plan ever devised bv network 
radio. Like Color Spread. Monitor uses 
the magazine concept and. in this sense, 
radio has learned from television. 

T>\ gearing both television and radio 
to modem selling, one arrives almost 
inevitably at the "combination" con- 
cept — the coordinated use of both me- 
dia. Here vou have the onlv non- 
duplicatiim combination of national 
advertising you can find. Suppose you 

11 JULY 1955 




Villon- Hull Bayes, president, 
i BS Radio, points out thai clients 
who do not use i idio shut them- 
selves "II i i one-third ol market 



Mlf^ IV. ildenl I F. 

id van 
■ lio'i M' ubilit) and buj 
plans ■• 



use Color Spread and Momtoi as \ "ii i 
forms from each medium. On Coloi 

Spread vou get impact and demonstra- 
tion at the time ol your choice — the 
righl time for your product. You gen- 
erate excitement about vour product 
in the trade and at the same time you 
sell it on the air. Through Monitor. 
on the other hand, vou get flexibility 
and repetition of brand-name selling. 
The combination of the two forms 
gives you the impact of color, excite- 
menl in the distribution chain, a- well 
as on-the-air. brand-name saturation. 
This kind of value-pattern in adver- 
tising is bound to grow ami grow. It 
rules out any undue emphasis on cost- 
per- l.di mi. \ on can bu) advertising 
for very little cost-per-1,000 on some 
television shows, or in radio, or in 
three-sheet-, or skv -writing. But if 

vou evaluate vehicles like the specta< u- 

lars and Color Spread on a cost-per- 
1,000 basis, you are missing the point 
completely. For such an evaluation 
does not take into account the dealer 
excitement, the talked-aboiit quality, 

the newness interest the ver] things 
that the spectaculars and Color Spread 
are designed to produce. 

The spectaculars, lfon£for,and Color 
Spread all buttress the trend we -tailed 
in 1949 with oar plan for rotation of 
advertising. In the future we will seek 
to place even greater numbers of ir- 
regular attraction- on top of our regu- 
lar show-. We will bfing our audi- 
ences opera, ballet, the circus] ice 
shows and entertainment of all kind-. 
as well .i- great national and world 
.\ent-. The advertiser who buys into 
a certain blue-chip asso< laubh-pattefn 



ol advertisements will gel his ^<\- on 
a -pc id' night along h ith othei 
i ti r «■- during the year] \nd he will 
have agreed to ii before we scheduled 
it. but in a pattei ii tli ii maki - - 

[Ol him and the audien e BS well. 

The trend is toward the 90-minute 
spectai ulars, the big-time one-shot 
-how- such as out U ide li ide '/ orld 
and the telementaries, the electronic 

;azines su< h as our I II '-'/' . the -i\- 
se< ond billboard announcements and 

network radio'- custom-built weekend 
cumulative audien..-. Id.-.- are all 
health) advertising and promotion 
trend- which we believe will hel] 
cure the place of television and radio. 
complementing eat h other, as the 
flexible media evei put in the - 
of the advert 



II I I \ ISION 

A 



J. J. \ an \ alkt'ttbtirq. president 

i BS I \ : \t no period in the past have 
so man) advertisers invested in net- 
work television so far in advance of 
the fall season. 

The) have mad.- their fall television 
plans particularl) earl] this oar in 
order to assure for th< - the best 

I fograms in the besl possible time 
periods. This applies not onl) to night- 
time television but to daytime as well, 
and clearl) establishes the advert - 
growing recognition of daytime ide- 
a's tremendous values in reaching 
'htinued next /*'-• 



47 



the housewife at the ver) lime she is 
making up her shopping list. 

Furthermore, advertisers recognize 
that this fall television will exert a 
greater influence over Americans than 
ever before. 

Bv October there will he more than 
36,000,000 television families 4,000,- 
(Kill more than a year ago. Of equal 
importance, this larger audience will 
spend even more time watching tele- 
vi>ion than last season when the 
monthl) average reached as much as 
five hum- and 53 minutes a day — an 
all-time high. 

Americans will devote so much more 
time to television next fall because 
there will be so many great new pro- 
grams to see. Day and night, the net- 
works are planning startling new se- 
ries, revealing new. intriguing pro- 
gram concepts and introducing famous 
names, new to television, including 
established performers, writers, pro- 
ducers and directors drawn in increas- 
ing numbers from the stage and mo- 
tion pictures. 

Those advertisers, planning well in 
advance, can look forward confidently 
this fall to the most productive selling 
season in television's history. 



TELEVISION 

A 



Ted Bergmann, managing director. 
DTN: Spectaculars may continue to 
Gome and spectaculars may continue 
to go, but the hard core use of the 
television medium at the network, re- 
gional and local level will always be 
contained in the sponsorship of the 
half-hour drama in the nighttime and 
the quarter hour in the daytime. Due 
to their ability to garner viewers week 
after week and year after year, these 
programs constitute the efficient "bread 
and butter" advertising and entertain- 
ment effort. 

Television station operators and ad- 
vertisers alike have discovered at least 
one of the facts of life regarding our 
great ubiquitous industry; as a result 
of this awareness, the live show, in 
quantity and frequency, is fast joining 
the brontosaurus. Live studio pro- 
graming requires lots of people behind 
the camera in addition to real estate 
and equipment. Once a live show is 
aired, it is gone forever. Unless the 
audience was there at the precise mo- 
ment, no amount of merchandising 
effort will recover the lost sales. The 



answer is obvious — and so is the ob- 
jection film and its high cost. But 
need it be high'.'' Suppose. Mr. Spon- 
sor, someone told you that your live 
program could be filmed for a small 
traction above its current live costs? 
Suppose further, that this film could 
he replayed under your sponsorship 
for free'.'' Third, fourth, filth, etc. runs 
of the same program could then be 
had with a small cast repav ment. \\ hat 
would you say? 

Of course, everybody says "show 
me" and that is just what we are do- 
ing. Ninety-four organizations con- 
sisting of advertisers, agencies, film 
producers and broadcasters have pa- 
raded through the Du Mont Tele- 
Centre in New York viewing demon- 
strations of the Du Mont Electronicam 
since our initial unveiling of the sys- 
tem; and with the exception of a few 
hard bitten cynics (there are always 
a few of them around ) , the enthusi- 



read newspapers. These people repre- 
sent more than a third of the U. S. 
buying public. Radio is the only me- 
dium most of them ever come into 
regular contact with. 

Needless to say, radio provides far 
more than this huge "exclusive audi- 
ence." With sets now in 96'^ of U. S. 
homes, radio reaches practically every- 
body. On the average, it reaches nine 
families in 10 for more than 17 hours 
every week. And despite the number 
of new stations that come on the air 
every month, it is the network stations 
and the network programs which at- 
tract the largest audiences. Even in 
the most highly saturated television 
markets, listeners prefer netivork ra- 
dio. Of the top radio programs in 
television's 24 biggest markets, 89% 
come from networks. 10' i originate 
locallv at network stations, and 1% 
come from independents. 

If the amount of time invested by 



Complete coverage of network television and 
radio appears in succeeding Fall Facts Basics 
sections. >-I%etwork television starts page 
86, including complete fall programing lineups. 
>-]%etwork radio appears starting page 170 



asm for this live television program- 
film method has been unanimous. 

We live in an age of progress. We 
work in an industry dependent upon 
progress. The Du Mont Electronicam 
is the result of progress. It will not 
only contribute efficiency but, also, 
better programing and the resultant 
better access to viewing audiences. 



RADIO 

A 



In /mi- Huff Hayes, president CBS 
Radio: The national advertiser who 
does not include radio in his schedule 
automatically shuts himself off from 
a third of his market. Today, there 
are still 30 million people who do not 
see television, 37 million who do not 
read magazines. 18 million who do not 



the listener isn't sufficient demonstra- 
tion of network radio's continuing 
high popularity, consider the amount 
of money invested by advertisers. 
Sponsors are currentlv spending $130.- 
000,000 a year for lime alone to sell 
on network radio. 

What the advertiser should buy on 
ladio depends entirely, of course, on 
what he is trying to do. One of the 
most attractive things about network 
radio is its flexibility — the way time 
can now be purchased in nearly any 
size or combination of sizes, to meet 
special advertising needs. 

Some advertisers see their major 
problem as that of reaching vast num- 
bers of different people throughout the 
week. General Motors, for example, 
is sponsoring 18 five-minute newscasts 
spread throughout the week on CBS 
Radio, and the cumulative effect of 
I Please turn to page 2961 



48 



SPONSOR 



VJb, 



4 1 50 ° 



,0* 



IS 






1 ; 



rur 



u "~ QucUa} 



^ 



A 



^ 







^C 



■u- 



^ 






■\W 



^^ R/£w^ <,^ •" 




, 



o 






rs(;> 



IiioiIkm* milestone 




V 



ig*c ^ 



SPONSOR brings advertisers 
FIRST industry estimates of 






spot expenditures 









... i J 



X 






2 



o°°< 




/jtutvW- 







^ 



?0 0r 



V 



OOQ, OO 



J5F^ ^ - 0,000 



SPONSOR estimates point up need for regular reports of spot spending l>\ 
advertisers to give admen full pieture of the way media dollar is divided 



Www the page- following appear the first puhli-hed 
estimates of the spot radio and tv expenditures of 
many oi the country's leading advertisers as gath- 
ered in a survey over many months l>\ sponsor. 
They attest to spot's dramatic rise to major stature 
a- an ad medium. 

The figures help in part to fill the great void in 
spot Statistics. No Ii~t of ad spending can be ac- 
curate, sponsor's spot figure- -how dramatically, 
without inclusion of spot expenditures. A good ex- 
ample i- shown in the case of Liebmann Brewerii s. 

Liebmann appears on the very bottom of the "top 
LOO" U.S. advertisers 1 i — t based on expenditure- in 
newspapers, magazines and network-. A- reported 
for these media by ANPA and PIB. Liebmann's 
1954 budget is set at $2,608,326. But sponsor esti- 
mate- that Liebmann's combined spot tv and radio 
budget came to $2,350,000 for the same period. 

11 JULY 1955 



almosl equal the total (gross) reported for the 
other media. Liebmann's maim media are thus 
completely unnoticed in the "top 100" lists cus- 
tomarily published. 

How misleading such listings can be is evident 
from the fact thai the Bulova Watch <'<>. is mi--ing 
entirel) from the LNPA-PIB "top 100." Yel this 
account spends an estimated $6,500,000 foi spot t\ 
alone an amount greater than the total figures 
over 60 of the "top LOO" based on ANPA-PIB. 

The sponsor listing make- no pretense at being 
complete. It was undertaken to encourage further 
effort to provide an industrywide service thai would 
give spol it- proper place in the media picture. From 
this pioneering efforl it i- apparent that despite the 
man) problems and obstacles, it i- possible to com- 
pile -pot dollar expenditures. ^ ^ 

SPONSOR learned during it- research that mosl r W 

49 



advertisers and agencies would wel- 
come regularl) published spot esti- 
mates willi enthusiasm. Most arc 
aware of -pot'* growing size and im- 
portance, but a surprising number are 
not. B) no means untypical is this ad 
manager's comment: "We have so 
main divisions, it would take a lot of 
time to do the accounting job. We 
1 1 1 — t haven't done it and we don't know 
ourselves what we spend in spot." 

Said another who complained of the 
same problem: "I haven't the vaguesl 
idea — when you find out what our 
spot expenditures were last year, please 
let me know. 



In many places sponsor found a 
ready sympathy for its endeavor to 
develop spot figures, and the amount 
of co-operation by various companies 
was greater than anticipated. 

Basis for spot tv spending estimates 
of three soap companies was N. C. 
"Duke" Rorabaugh who makes regu- 
lar estimates of spending 1>\ soaps and 
other products based on his Rorabaugh 
Report on spot tv activity. Companies 
referred to are: Procter & Gamble. 
Colgate and Lever Bros. 

Rank order of advertisers in the list 
below is based on their expenditures 
in newspapers, supplements, magazine 




Spot figure* include product 

The sources from which SPONSOR 
obtained the estimates above must 
remain confidential. For the 
most part, they can be assumed to 
be substantially correct. Where no 
information at all is available, the 
words "no estimate" appears. In a num- 
ber of cases the amounts were so 
small as to be considered negligible. 
Estimates of "under 525,000 fall into 
this category. Blank means that 
the company is known to have used no 
spot at all. Liquors, which are by custom 
barred from radio and television, are 
described as "not eligible." Automobile 



,«Tf 



FOR THE FIRST TIME- 

Advertj$<r Total Newspapers General and Network 

In 4 media only and Supplements Farm Magazines Radio 

1. General Motors Corp $72,036,827 $37,391,415 $20,560,238 $ 3,780.932 

2. Procter & Gamble Co 49,836,201 7,251,400 6,543,905 12,339.668 

3. Colgate-Palmolive Co 33,607,968 10,990,682 3,713,779 4,813.770 

4. Ford Motor Co 32,548,927 17,999,652 7,802,561 774,408 

5. General Foods Corp 32,418,050 9,351,441 10,037,913 3,300,129 

6. Chrysler Corp 29,751,899 11,787,596 7,276,136 1,867,212 

7. General Electric Co 21,262,506 3,792,542 9,558,916 949,500 

8. Lever Bros. Co 21,050,751 6,803,797 2,561,151 4,471,376 

9. Gillette Co 20,744,721 2,296,936 1,344,955 5,562,378 

10. B. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co .,19,500.175 3,100,393 2,799.914 1,770,940 

11. General Mills Inc 18,098,358 3,186,138 3,557,233 3,724.388 

12. American Tobacco Co 17,663,577 2,623,775 4,028,033 1,526,617 

13. Distillers Corp.-Seagrams Ltd. . . . 16,416,836 9,815,375 6,601,461 

14. Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co 15.148,774 3,628,065 2,467.438 2,291,452 

15. P. Lorillard Co 13,954,647 1,202,477 2,781,481 3,300,830 

1 6. National Dairy Products Corp. . . . 13.008,123 3,338,891 2,972,715 812,300 

17. American Home Products Corp. . . 12,655,874 1,587,823 2,058,815 3,474,699 

18. Campbell Soup Co 11,767,988 1.567,374 5.081,057 573,195 

19. National Distillers Products Corp. 11,527,200 6,718,375 4.808,825 

20. Swift & Co 11,038,835 2.971,310 2,117,914 3,048,726 

21. Sehenley Industries Inc 9,441,430 6,157,600 3.283,830 

22. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co 8,978,809 2,267,630 4,743,546 333,622 

23. Sterling Drug Inc 8,919,299 2,822,348 1,854.212 3,518.756 

24. Quaker Oats Co 8,799,180 2.136,409 2,726,988 1,570,399 

25. Kellogg Co 8,746.510 1,059,120 1,513,361 1,910,402 

26. Pillsbury Mills Inc 8,483,782 907,095 1,516,827 2,049,177 

27. Rristol-Myers Co 8,255,450 922.532 3.040,210 1.481.137 

28. Miles Labs 8,109,116 319,010 921,639 6,172.592 

29. Standard Brands Inc 7,926,186 3.740.877 3.048.647 

30. Westinghouse Electric Corp 7,862,273 2,184.427 2.056,236 

31. Philip Morris Inc 7.694,243 1,245,847 l.f>52.886 1,126.951 

32. American Motors Corp 7.492.520 4.015,528 1,958.167 40.477 

33. S. C. Johnson & Sons 7,213,065 1.626,338 1.007. 196 1.865,201 

34. Radio Corp. of America 7.210.115 1,569,702 2^66,555 883.275 

35. Studebaker-Packard Corp 6.748.754 5.121,118 1.329,396 

36. Philco Corp 6,598,872 1.349.976 1,200.514 1,316,962 

37. Borden Co 6,431,896 2,811.797 1,636.358 

38. Amer. Telephone & Telegraph Co. 6,399,801 85.825 5,498394 815,582 

39. Armour & Co 6,397,025 2,413.462 2,107.475 661,509 

40. Texas Co 6,168,586 2,172,663 2.635,722 881.582 

41. Coca-Cola Co 6.082,929 1,558,936 1.701,464 459.609 

42. E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. . . 5.714.a59 818.794 1. 154.877 

43. Carnation Co 5,548,371 1,652.143 844,902 1,887,465 

I I. Serutan Co 5.266.153 396.492 3.864 

45. Monsanto Chemical Co 5,236.117 4,101,841 865,129 

46. Nestle Co , 5.223.567 3.344,852 1.307.751 146.206 

47. Firestone Tire & Bubber Co 5,144,177 949.585 1.870.252 766.935 

48. Int'l. Cellucotton Products Co. . . . 5,037.912 " 1.635.247 2.557.869 407.966 

19. Johnson & Johnson 4,994.655 878.393 3*915,499 

50. Eastman Kodak Co 4,829,543 1.708.488 3,121.055 

SOURCES: gnreau Ing »i ANPA. I'll! ulih SPONSOR eaUmatac for spcrt. 



1954 advertising expenditures 



Network 

Television 

$10,304,242 

23,701.228 

14,089,737 

5,972306 

9,728,567 

8,820,955 

6,961,548 

7,214.427 

11.540,452 

11,828.928 

7,630,599 

9,485.152 

6,131,819 
6,669,855 
5,884,217 
5.534,537 
4,546.362 

2,900,885 

1,634,011 
723,983 
2.365.384 
4,263.627 
4,010.683 
2,778.271 
695,875 
1,136.662 
3,621,610 
3.668.559 
1.478.348 
2.714.030 
1,890.583 
298.240 
2.731.120 
1.983,741 



1.214.579 

478.619 

2.362.920 

711.188 

1.163.561 

4.86x71)7 

269.1 17 

1.121.758 

1 .557.345 

436.830 

200.763 



Spot 
Radio 

S3.000.000+ 
S 1.750.000 
SI, 750.000 
S3.000.000 
no estimate 
S3,000.000 
S200,000 
S750.000 



S 1.600.000 
S375.000 
S500.000 
not eligible 

no estimate 
S IIMMIIIO 
SI. 500.000 
SI 00.000 
not eligible 
no estimate 
not eligible 
no estimate 
SI. 500.000 
S200.000 
under 825.000 
under S25.000 
S350.000 
no estimate 
S250.000 
no estimate 
SI 35,000 
no estimate 
no estimate 
SI. 000.000 
no estimate 
no estimate 
S750.000 



no estimate 
S950.000 
S2.000.000 
no estimate 
no estimate 
no estimate 
no estimate 
8750.000 
no estimate 
no estimate 
under S25.000 



Spot 
Television 

S5.000.000 

S10.500.0O 

S3.000.000 

S6.000.000 

S3.2O0.000 

S4. 500.000 

S220.000 

81,250,000 

SI, 900.000 
S750.000 
S600,000 
not eligible 

SI. 200.000 
S9 10.000 
Sl.500.000 
8500.000 
not eligible 
no estimate 
not eligible 
no estimate 
84.000.000 
no estimate 
no estimate 
under S25,G 
no estimate 
S4.000.000 
SI. 600.000 
no estimate 
891.000 
no estimate 
no estimate 
S300.000 
no estimate 
no estimate 



no estimate 

S2.000.000 
no estimate 
no estimate 
no estimate 
8900.000 
S750.000 
no estimate 
no estimate 
8125.000 



arv estimates of net upending 

ompany estimate! include co-op expen- 
liturcs, for purposci of comparison with 

he newspaper figures. Newspaper ex- 

jndifurcs reported above, however, 
lo not distinguish between company and 
L.il r \harcs, but arc estimates of total 
lollors, while SPONSOR'S spot estimates 

ake into account only the company 
.harr. Note that when spot figures are 
iddtJ to a company's total ad budget it 
S I'kely to change that firm's ranking 
— which points up the pressing need lor 
■u^h estimates to complete the picture. 
Most figures shown include product on 
:osts, arc estimated actual expenditures. 



.ii.l I. ii in magazines, network i 
and le\e\ ision 1 .1- reported bj \\l" \ 
.mil I'll!'. No attempt has been made 
to [r\ 1-. the "i del "I this ranking 
based on -1 "i expenditures; spol is 
m. 1 -li..u 11 in. luded in the "totals l"i 
. .i< Ii advei tisei . In ordei to < ompili .1 
1 1 ii<- I1-1 ..I the top LOO advertisers in 
,11 majoi media, it would have been 
11 cessai ) t" f ■ 1 — t obtain est i mat 
spol spending foi all majoi Bpol ad- 
v , 1 tisei s. I "i man) big spol advei 
lisei s do H"i even Bhovi up it the bot- 
tom i'l the lisl "l advertisers below if 
their spending in newspapers, n 
zines and networks is minimal. 



.1 H illi Ii 

mining — j • « - 1 spend inj; ..t tin 'top 1 
1 tisers below, mmv- ii 
.hi reliable I 
..I them. \n effort was madi 

• mil. ilr mi ..III. 11 

. -1 spol spenders firsl and in n 
dvertisen 
timal 'itli small 

budgets. 

Spol has grow n t" matui it) in b 
,,1 billing. \n !• « epted industry -wide 
spot estimating service would go lai 
toward m hievemenl ol the adv< 1 1 
,, . ognition !.> whit li spol is entitled. 

* * * 



■ . J" I Please note: ranking of the 100 advertisers shown on this chart is bos 
SIX ITldJOr fTI6dl3 on four media ot left and does not include expenditures in spot radio and 

Totil Newipaprr* Central and 
«ovrrri$«r In 4 medli only «nd Supplements Farm Magitflnes 

National Biscuit Co Sl.819.2W $2354,007 

A\eo >lfg. Corp 13562286 1,379,852 

Vtm. Wrigley Jr. Co 1. 166. 1 12 1396320 

Soeon> -\ ncuuni Oil Co 1,435,708 2389 

Itcxall Drug Co 1,405375 8.i.9BI 

Andrew Jcrgcns Co 4351,797 1,140,117 

llclcnc C urtis Industries Inc. . . . 1 2,0.333 1,952,681 

Kaiser Mntora Corp 1,163357 1389,091 

Jos. Srhlit* Brewing Co 4.089.01') 1,186360 

Gulf Oil Co 1375,774 2.018.212 

Broun A Williamson Tobacco Co. 4.064.370 677.5 57 

Scott Paper Co 3,952310 287.126 

B. F. Goodrich Co 1,756422 >,854 

Biram Walker 3,734,098 1.821.078 

Sunbeam Corp 3,665,415 111.207 

Anheuser-Busch Co 1376,767 1.693.231 

Pepsi-Cola Co 3,563.175 1.543,614 

Standard Oil Co. of Indiana .... 3354339 1,469.876 

Florida Citrus Commission .... .172.384 591.642 

Wesson Oil & Snowdrift Co i. 1 16.146 1,097355 

Pabst Brewing Co 3,383.602 372,795 

Syliania Electric Products Inc.. 3330312 789.859 

Borg-Warner Corp 3.219. 105 722.908 

Bazel Bishop Inc 3.186.621 285.2 18 

Pet Milk Co 5.180.780 271.518 

Corn Products Refining Co 172.761 1.061.707 

U. S. Steel Corp 3.153.626 277345 

Aluminum Co. of America 3,153,197 70.772 

Dow Chemical Co 3.149.112 224,409 

Best Foods Inc 3.134.340 .361 

Boubleday & Co 3.061.392 2.087.931 

Prudential Ins. Co. of Amer. . . . 2.977.389 1.239.630 

H. J. Beinz Co 2,973,712 1331,857 

Clorox Chemical Co 2.883.106 2.330.131 

Consolidated Cosmetics Inc 2.855.218 1,707,173 

Fnstern Airlines Inc 2.819.776 2.819.77'. 

Brow n-Forman Distillers Corp. . 2.812.308 1303 

Admiral Corp 2.802.698 9,465 

Sun Oil Co 2,795322 1 .610.9',: 

Carter Products Inc 2,789334 10.211 

Inion Carbide-Carbon Corp. . . . 2.747307 939.235 

Armstrong Cork Co 2.718.383 

Greyhound Corp 2.701.251 1,741 

Lambert Co 2.683.935 368.156 

Pan American World Airlines Inc. 2,665,457 1.130.703 

Hallmark Cards Inc 2341382 66,053 

Standard Oil Co. of V J 522 

American Airlines Inc 108 2 1 

Mutual Benefit II. A A. Assn. . . . 2,617,097 1303,130 

I i. -Lilian n Breweries Inc 2.608.326 2,435,829 



cd only 
spot tv 



| 749369 

1,623308 

134,027 

1 ,683,026 

2.231.977 
1,444390 
1,057394 

1.057.138 
1,073397 

326.136 
1.154.213 
1,457,416 
2,026,194 

1.913.020 

1.332.391 

93,190 

850.806 

81.727 

842.2 .'■ 

1.092.595 

427. 109 

698.8 18 

2.U59.212 

39.916 

1.716.863 
1.170.775 
1.762.303 

792.9HI 
1,463310 

941,426 

8.525 

1.458.863 

552.675 

172.117 

1.308.778 

1.182.841 

222.127 

5.225 

1.780.772 

1.509.017 

1,092 

1.107.281) 

1,061 

210.111 

66.266 

19 1.716 

172.197 



Network 
Radio 

$ 660.115 

18,419 

1,723,700 

.289 
62 

195.195 

220.710 

1.717.028 



132.311 



18365 

1.79(1.;!' 

1.258.817 

1,013.832 

32.100 



18.565 
769,980 
266.433 



29.586 
820319 



217.039 



151316 
962358 



3 16,989 

556.598 

523.350 



Network 
Television 

-.599 

1314307 

6 12. 1 95 

1,464 

1.172.095 
1.1 H 9.6 V8 

1.828.992 
1,701396 

2.100.506 

2.208.068 

991.071 

1370,452 

1.168.755 

710.819 

991.671 

1.256.196 

2.551.298 

1.712.20.5 

1572285 

2343,092 

2.156.252 

127.758 

1305306 

1.320.122 

2,131 332 

717.166 

2. 1 19 

908,715 

282,992 

758.a59 



1.02(5.876 

1.779.560 

27300 

'.566 

221399 

.561.510 
174 
1.778.620 
156300 

831.397 



8**t 
Radio 

8250.000 
s | 50.000 
no csliin.ilr 
8000.000 
S500.000 
SI5.0(M» 
835,000 
no estimate 
no estimate 
no estimate 
S500.000 
no estimate 
S2 50.000 
not eligible 

no estimate 
83 15.000 
S750.000 



m> estimate 
no estimate 



no estimate 
no estimate 
no estimate 
no estimate 

no estimate 
nil estimate 
no estimate 
no estimate 
under 825.000 
no estimate 



no estimate 
S 100.000 
not eligible 
no estimate 
no estimate 
si in. nun 

no est imate 
no estimate 
no estimate 
no estimate 
no estimate 
no estimate 
SI. 500. 000 
Sl.500.000 



S750.000 



8250.000 

82.000.000 

8800.000 

81.500.000 

S500.000 

s:t5.ooo 

875.000 

no estimate 
no estimate 
no est imate 
87.500.000 
no estimate 



no estimate 

no estimate 

8080.000 

81.100.000 

no estimate 

no est i m a li- 
no estim.i li- 
no est i in. ■ li- 
no estimate 
no est im.iK- 



no estimate 
no estimate 
SI.80O.OOO 
no est imate 



no estimate 



no i-sc im.i n- 
805. OOO 
not eligible 
no i-si imate 
no estimate 
8000.000 
no est imale 
no estimate 
no estimate 
no estimati- 
on estimate 
no est i in. rii e 
Sl.500.000 



SI. 000. OOO 




lly advice on 
fall I iniebiiyiiiaf 

16 reps toll admen what they consider best buying 
opportunities in spot tv and radio this fall 



Representative firm executives whose 
statements appear below alphabetically 
by firm name give admen what they 
consider their best buying tip for fall. 

Lewis H. Avery, president, Avery- 
Knodel: Don't overlook the self-rein- 
forcing possibilities of radio and tele- 
vision in combination. Here in the 
broadcast media, is the greatest op- 
portunity to influence public opinion 
of your product or your service that 
has ever existed for advertisers. Tele- 
vision delivers its powerful impact by 
monopolizing the two major senses, 
while radio is everywhere reinforcing 
and reminding the prospect of the op- 
portunity the advertisers' product or 
service offers. The adroit use of both 
media will pay off at the best odds. 

John Blair, president John Blair & 
Co.: So far as radio is concerned, 
there are two important facts for the 
advertiser to bear in mind. One is 



that, because of the growth in set own- 
ership, better local programing and 
other factors, there is more listening 
to the radio being done in 1955 than 
there was in 1944. The second impor- 
tant fact is the strong trend toward 
self-service in retailing, which means 
that brand identification is more im- 
portant than ever. Spot radio is the 
universally-heard advertising medium 
which allows, at low cost, the hourh. 
dail) and weekly repetition of brand 
name and sales stor\ which builds 
brand name recognition, and forces 
the sale at the point of purchase. 

So far as television is concerned, 
its sales impact is too well-known to 
need repeating here. The important 
single fact for the spot tv user this 
fall to bear in mind is that more ad- 
vertisers are going to use more of it 
this year than ever before, choice avail- 
abilities are limited, and the advertiser 
who buys early for fall use will have 
a better chance at a top schedule. 



These are rep executives whose comments appear starting above: I. Lewis H. Avery, pres. 
Avery-Knodel; 2. John Blair, pres. John Blair & Co.; 3. George W. Boiling, pres. The Boiling 
Co.; 4. Merle S. Jones, v. p. in charge CBS TV Spot Sales; 5. H. Preston Peters, pres. Free & 
Peters; 6. George P. Hollingbery, pres. George P. Hollingbery Co.; 7. Frank E. Pellegrin, 
partner H-R Representatives; 8. Scott Donahue, sales manager for television, The Katz Agency. 




52 



SPONSOR 



George M. BoMmo, president, The 
Boiling Co.: Formula buying and pre- 
< onceh < - • I stal ion select ion, often de 
lei the experienced buyers from ex- 
ercising their own capable judgment, 
thus preventing the ad\ ertisei ii om ac- 
quit ing man) * aluable Franchises. Ine 
real i ii tue "I su© essful radio and tele- 
vision depends upon live, vibrant, vo- 
i al human beings w ho lend theii in- 
dividual personalities i" the advertis- 

ei - mi'--. i . 

Hence, programs differ from one 
another because ol the personalirj ol 
the talent. Stations also differ from 
one anothei because "I the endeavors, 
judgment, and reflected personalities 
ol then management, rhe experienced 
Inner knows these differences. I se his 
judgment. Trust his decisions. 



llrrl*' .s. Jones, 



\.p. in charge 



d 



CBS T\ Spol Sales: Recent!) I 
looked ovei several rating analyses 
for daytime saturation schedules pres- 
ent!) on ilic air on stations represented 
b) CBS Television Spot Sales. One of 
these, ;i schedule ol 21 announce- 
ments, delivers a total ol l-~><> rating 
point- weekly, reaches "><>'< of the en- 
tire market in four week-. Another 
1 ( ) announcement campaign delivers 
1 5 1 rating points in one week, reaches 
81 ft of the total television audience 
in four week-. The COStS-per-1,000 are 
eijualh impressive: 66c and 7.V. 

These two cases are typical of the 
results being attained on all our sta- 
tions with daytime television, a "buy" 
which can i be bettered in term- ol 
effectiveness and econom) . 

II. Presten Peters, president, Free 
& Peters: Spot broadcasting is so 



broad in its covet powei ful in 

it- sales '-ii' ■■ tiveness, and so flexible 
in it- use thai it is sometimes used onl) 
to bolstei i * -nit- in -pec ith areas • ■! 
ertain seasons. I In- i« i thai it "d< 
livers" in sales and advertising impres 
-ion- when used even on ■< limited 
basis suggests thai there are man) 
gales opportunities missed in advertis 
n planning il Bpol broad 
casting - pla< e as i national advei t is- 
ing medium i- negle* ted. 

< )ne reason i"i bui Ii a la< k ol un- 
derstanding ol national spol broad< ist- 
ing ma) have been the difficult) in 
finding true potential i a\ ei age and 
estimating possible i osts infoi mation 
which i- readil) available for othei 

media. I help ad\ ei li-ci - a cui atel) 
estimate what advertising dollars will 

bu) in national spol radio, and then 

b) take ad\ antage ol new sales oppoi ■ 

tunities, we reeenlh published a v |>"t 

Radio Guide with the V C. Nielsen 
Compan) as collaborators. 

George '*• HoUingbery, president 

< leorge P. I lollingber) < \o. : Sponsoi - 
and bu) ers in both radio and tele\ ision 
are ii \ ing to bu) the mosl circulation 
the) can for the dollar. We at the 
HoUingbery Compan) know that a 
good personality is sometimes more 
important than rating point- and re 
oinniend personalities be i redded with 
from five to li> extra rating point- in 
making a decision. 

Frank E. Pellegrin, partner, H-B 
Representatives. Inc.: \d\erti-er- 
should be prodded h\ their agencies 
this fall to reexamine all media I > u \ - 

in print and outdoor media. Tele- 
i Please turn to page 2 ( >2 i 



9. Sidney J. Wolf, pres. Keystone Broadcasting System; 10. Robert Meeker, pres. Robert Meeker 
& Assoc; I I. Tom McFadden, v. p. — director NBC Spot Sales; 12. John E. Pearson, John E. Pear- 
son Co.; 13. Lloyd George Venard, pres. Venard, Rintoul & McConnell; 14. Wythe Walker, pres. 
Walker Representation Company; 15. Joseph J. Weed, pres. Weed TV; 16. Adam J. Young 
Jr. pres. Adam J. Young Jr. Inc. Their comments provide over-all look at spot trends. 




15. 




14. 





11 JULY 1955 



This is local programing, 1955 

Program trends of 77% of radio. 86% of tv outlets shown in 'Buyers' Guide' 



harts on these pages map out for agencymen and sponsors the 
patterns of today's local-level programing specialties in the U.S. 
Based on a survey of all U.S. radio and tv outlets, the job of sifting 
these facts for the recently published 200-page 1955 Buyers' Guide 
involved eight months of work. More than 50,000 local air facts had 
to be compiled. 

Highlights of the study: 92% of the responding radio outlets carry 
popular music shows, and more than 10% of stations carry 75 or more 
pop music hours per week. Some 78% of stations now carry concert 
music, up from '54 level. Other stepped-up specialties: farm program- 
ing, Negro radio, news, religion. 

Two charts below, compiled by Project Director Karolyn Richman, 
show broad trends of radio, highlights of tv programing throughout 
U.S. Chart at right shows state-by-state portrait of radio programing 
at local level, broken down by specialized program appeals to audi- 
ence segments. It shows how states often vary in programing tastes. 



i 






— ' 


buyers 




to radm and tv station programing 




******* **** **»■*■ 




PRESTIGE? 


RADIO 

• 


St% dl HH-»i rafene* bm me*-*-, »t tSMO w „„,. 




"too 5t% *8* 


• 


•5,000 """ , T "5000 




/ '5,000 


---*"■ ~~ 


- 


^^^^^^ 








***'■!!< 




-<— — _. 


ttW « ■ H W 


~zzzr~ 






..-,-:-:.: ^'M 



R 
A 
D 

I 
O 



Profile of local radio programing based on SPONSORS "Buyers* Guide' 



Daytime stations sunrise to sunset 

Stations on air to midnight 

Stations programing past midnight 

Stations on air 24 hours per day 

Stations affiliated with national networks 

Independent stations 

Stations programing popular music 

Pop music specialists ( 75 wkly hrs or more) ... 

Stations programing concert music 

Concert music specialists (10 wkly hrs or more) . 

Stations programing folk music 

Folk music specialists (10 wkly hrs or more) ... 

Stations scheduling religious programs 

Religious specialists (10 wkly hrs or more) 



1954: based on questionnaires from 1568 stations 
1955: based on questionnaires from 2172 stations 



% 


Total 


Respondents 


1954 


1955 


33%* 


29% 


51%* 


54% 


18%* 


17%- 


5%* 


5%' 


50% 


50% 


50% 


50% 


88% 


92% 


8% 


12%, 


61% 


78% 


9% 


23% 


66% 


77%, 


14% 


16% 


54% 


83% 


6% 


17% 


55% 


of U.S. 


77% 


of U.S. 



% Total 
Respondents 



Stations programing 
audience 



1954 

Stations scheduling local farm programs 64% 

Farm specialists (5 wkly hrs or more) 41 % 

Stations scheduling homemaking programs 46% 

Mexican -American 

7% 

Stations programing* to other foreign language 

audiences 19% 

Stations programing to a Negro audience 25%* 

Stations offering play-by-play sports 55% 

Stations scheduling daily newscasts 92% 

Stations subscribing lo a national news service 82% 

Stations subscribing to a transcription library 



1955 

70% 
31% 
61% 

7% 

17% 

29%* 

59% 

98% 

96% 

81% 



^Totals exclude Canadian respondents 

stations and 35% of Canadian stations on the air as of April 1, 1954 
stations and 66% of Canadian stations on the air as of April 1, 1955 



T 

E 

L 

E 

V 

I 

S 

I 

o 

N 



Profile of local television programing based on SPONSOR'S "Buyers' Guide" 



No. of Stations % Total 
Programing (1955 only) Responding Respondents 

Stations offering daily local newscasts 364 96 r ~r 

Stations offering local newsreel coverage 191 50 f r 

Stations offering daily sportscasts 319 85 r i 

Stations offering play-by-play sports coverage 130 34% 

Stations offering local homemaking programs 319 96% 

Stations offering local children's programs — 351 *>2 ' , 

Stations offering variety shows 265 TO', 

Stations featuring hillhilh -wc-tcru variety 134 .to', 

Stations offering farm service programing 207 56 ' * 

Stations offering syndicated films 312 82% 

Stations offering dallj feature films 361 95 f \ 

Station- scheduling morning films 61 16% 



N 
Programing (1955 only) 


o. of Stations 
Responding R 

228 

125 

318 

35 
424* 

446* 
326* 
125* 

April 1. 1955 


'. Total 
espondents 

60 % 

33% 

83% 

9% 
94%* 

99%* 

72 f ; • 

28%* 


Stations scheduling early evening films 


Stations programing (at least partly) for a 


Station- affiliated with national network- 

Stations affiliated with national sales repre- 






*Based on total of 151 stations on air as of 



54 



SPONSOR 



How trend toward radio station specialization varies by states 





No 
•t It* 

Hon, r»- 

porting 

▼ 


•. Ihl» 
it el 










Ma 


tlon% on 


phMirlno, then* rifht proor-m opecalt 
A 












rtati f 

total 

▼ 






r 

No 


•rm 


Folk 
No % 


Farolfo. 
No 


Mrildn 

No 


Nof.ro 


P»» IT 

No 








Con 

No 






ALABAMA 






I 


1 ," i 


12 


(21) 




i Hi 


1 


















ARIZONA 


20 


(64) 


3 






1 1 ») 


1 




1 








(10) 


1 








\Kk \Ns\«, 


S9 


(78) 


1 


( 2) 


i; 


1 I:. 


7 






1 1 


1 














CALIFORNIA 


124 


i ;;;i 


11 


(33) 


26 


(21 i 


1 . 


U fl 






51 HI 






;i 








COLOR VIM) 


30 


(77) 


8 


i 26 1 


1 I 


> 16) 


'i 


(20) 


1 


i 13i 




I 


1 1 i> 










CONNECTICUT 


26 


(93) 


B 


(31) 


2 


1 Hi 






11 


(54) 






'III 




'Hi 






' dki \\\ mm: 


7 


i 100) 


2 


(28 > 


2 


(28) 




1 1 




I 1 


1 


2 




i 


Hli 






DISTRICT OF COH MIMA 


8 


1 89 1 


3 


(37) 


2 


( 25 1 




I 1 


2 














1 




FLORIDA 


80 


(84) 


25 


(31) 


7 


( 8) 


13 


I I6i 


6 


i 7i 




W 


' 17 i 




| 1. 


12 


111 


GEORGIA 


66 


1 75 1 


11 


( 17) 


9 


(13) 


25 


i »! i 


■) 




' 






2 






11. 


IDAHO 


18 


(781 


6 


< 33 ) 


11 


(61) 


2 


l III 


1 


i 6i 


1 




1 ' 




' ' 




1 


ILLINOIS 


69 


(781 


13 


i 19) 


29 


1 12i 


6 


1 B) 


8 


< II > 




II 


' 15 i 


1 






1 |) 


i\ni \\\ 


17 


(82) 


6 


(13) 


21 


i 15 i 


3 




5 


1 on 




« 


1 1 ,' 


j 


' 1. 


'. 


l ;. 


low \ 


i;> 


1 86 ' 


8 


( 18i 


27 


(61)1 


3 


1 7) 


6 


(13) 




1 


' 2' 


6 






7) 


K \NsV-, 


34 


(75) 


8 


(23) 


15 


i it. 


5 


'!",» 


2 


1 6. 




1 




7 


(20) 


1 




KIM I OKI 


40 


(78) 


4 


( 101 


11 


( 35 1 


19 


i 17) 


1 






15 


(38) 




1 1 


8 




l.Ol ISI VN \ 


41 


(72i 


5 


1 12. 


6 


■ Hi 


9 


,22) 


8 


i 19) 


1 






7 


■17. 


9 




MAINE 


15 


(93) 


2 


I L3) 


6 


1 10! 




1 i 


7 


i 17 i 






' i 


1 


' 7. 






MARYLAND 


26 


1 92 1 


4 


i 15 1 


12 


( 15 » 


"> 


i I9i 


1 


i 1 5 i 




8 




1 


. 15) 


» 




M kSSACHUSETTS 


46 


(87) 


19 


HI) 


7 


(15) 




i i 


25 


| 5 1 1 






' 6) 


II 


'21i 




<,, 


MICHIGAN 


55 


(74) 


19 


( 34 ) 


17 


(31) 


1 


i 2) 


16 


(29) 




11 


1 25 1 


11 




12 




MINNESOTA 


36 


1 7:. i 


7 


(19) 


15 


, i_-i 


9 


(25) 


10 


(28) 






' ' 


2 




7 


19. 


MISSISSIPPI 


35 


(64) 


5 


(14) 


7 


(20) 


10 


(28) 


1 






26 


'71' 


1 




7 


20. 


MISSOURI 


51 


(83) 


6 


(11) 


24 


1 Hi 


11 


(20) 


5 


i 9i 




7 


' 1 ii 


3 


. 9. 


1 1 




MONTANA 


18 


( 77, 1 


3 


(17) 


7 


(39) 


1 


i 6) 


2 


<11' 






' ' 




1 1 






NEBRASKA 


23 


(85) 


3 


(13) 


14 


(61) 




1 1 


3 


HI' 






1 ' 


3 


'13. 


5 




Nl \ IDA 


6 


(50) 


2 


(33) 


2 


(33) 




1 1 




1 I 




1 3 


',01 


1 


M7i 






NEW HAMPSHIRE 


8 


(66) 


3 


(38) 


3 


(38) 


1 


(13) 


5 


( 63 i 






' ' 


1 


Hi. 


1 


Hi 


NEW JERSEY 


20 


(100) 


8 


(40) 


3 


(15) 


1 


( 5) 


10 


i 50 1 




i 10 


(50) 


5 


' 25 ) 




15) 


NEW MEXICO 


26 


(81) 


10 


(381 


4 


(15) 


6 


( 23 ) 


2 


i 8) 


1 1 ' V, 




1 i 


1 


' li 


2 


Hi 


NEW YORK 


93 


(81) 


32 


1 3 1 1 


29 


(31) 


3 


( 3) 


36 


(39) 




) 17 


(18) 


16 


-17i 


6 


7 i 


NORTH CAROLINA 


89 


(77) 


11 


(12) 


31 


i 3 1 1 


30 


(33) 




1 1 


1 


• 51 


'60) 




' i 






NORTH DAKOTA 


16 


(100) 


2 


( 13) 


10 


( 63 ) 


3 


(18) 


1 


i 6i 


1 


1 


1 1 




' ' 






OHIO 


65 


(83) 


16 


(25) 


25 


(38) 


6 


( 9) 


18 


(27i 


1 


i 20 


(31) 


10 




15 




OKLAHOMA 


34 


(70) 


2 


( 6) 


18 


(53) 


6 


H7) 


1 


i ,,i 




> 8 




2 


. 6) 


10 




OREGON 


38 


(71) 


10 


I 2') i 


13 


(34) 


1 


( 8) 


1 


i 31 






' ' 


12 


(31) 






PENNSYLVANIA 


99 


(79i 


25 


( 25 ) 


28 


(28) 


1 


( 1) 


35 


1 35 1 




» 18 


' 18) 


1 i 




11 


Hi 


RHODE ISLAM) 


10 


(90) 


h 


10) 


1 


il()i 




( » 


6 


(60) 




1 1 


. 10) 




' ' 




1 


SOI Til CAROLINA 


n 


(80) 


5 


(11) 


10 


(23) 


12 


(27) 


1 


i 2i 




' 3 1 


'77' 




■ l> 


12 




SOUTH DAKOTA 


10 


(77) 


4 


i 10) 


7 


(70) 




i i 


1 


i 10) 






1 1 










TENNESSEE 


51 


(72) 


5 


I 10 I 


15 


(291 


22 


' l!i 


1 


i 2) 




2". 


. 1';. 


1 


' Hi 


16 




TEX \S 


119 


(72) 


21 


(16) 


18 


1 32 1 


38 


i 25 1 


8 


i 5) 




59 


I llli 


20 








UTAH 


16 


(84) 


9 


l 56 | 


1 


( 25 1 




i i 


, 


i 19i 


2 '11 


1 1 






' ,1 ' 




' 


N ERMONT 


12 


(92) 


3 


(25) 


6 


( 50 1 




i i 


3 


■2".' 


i 






1 


' Hi 






VIRGINIA 


53 


( 83 i 


13 


( 25 1 


15 


(28) 


13 


' 25 i 


2 


< 1) 




21 




1 


' Hi 


11 




WASHINGTON 


49 


(82) 


8 


i 16i 


12 


'21i 


3 


i 6i 


". 


' 10' 


2 1 1 






11 




12 




WEST VIRGINIA 


31 


(74) 


6 


(19) 


9 




8 


i 26 i 


5 


i 16i 


' 


« 






' ' 


9 




WISCONSIN 


50 


(76i 


9 


• IS » 


23 


1 56 1 


7 


(14) 


16 


i . ,2 ' 


' 


1 


i 8i 


8 


i 16) 






WYOMING 


8 


(50) 


1 


1 13) 


2 












1 (13 




. i 











SOURCE: 1955 "Buyers' Guide fo Station Programing." published by Sponsor Services Inc. 



Local radio specialties: Chart aln>\< point- up fact that special- 
ised radio programing i> closely related in geographic location, 
according to the Interest, tastes of population. Only, 8% «>f radio 
outlet* in Florida make a featured specialty of farm programing, 



foi example, whi - in Iowa feature farm shows. 

radio i- strong in the deep South (often, mor<" than 5< 
stations will offer Negro shows) »hil»- it i- a rarity in Rockies and 
upper Midwest. "Specialty stations' 1 ar> denned in chart at left. 



1955 SALES AFTER 23 WEEKS 
OF TV: 16,874 



Are j oh planning a 
media test for fall? 



HA. >1 results show you can relate media to sales 



J%. dvertisers considering media tests 
for fall will find the experiences of the 
Bumham & Morrill Co. of Portland, 
Me., valuable as an indication that 
clean-cut correlation of advertising 
and sales can be attained simply. 
B&M over the past several months has 
been testing television I as reported in 
issues of SPONSOR from 7 February 
through the present). It chose as its 
test market the Green Bay, Wis., re- 
gion where it's sales had always been 



minimal because the people of the area 
were not conditioned to its type of 
bean — the high-cost, oven-baked va- 
riety. And it has been able to see a 
significant sales rise clearly attribut- 
able to television in the 23 weeks of 
testing reported to SPONSOR thus far. 
There's nothing to confuse the pic- 
ture in the B&M test. It used no ad- 
vertising in Green Bay last year. This 
year it turned to a $12,500 26-week 
tv campaign. Meanwhile no other fac- 



B&M SALES SECOND HALF OF JUNE 1954 vs. 1955 





18 oz. 


27 


oz. 


brown 


bread 


Sales by dozens of B&M beans and 
brown bread at wholesale levelt 


1954 


vs. 1955 


1954 


/s. 1955 


1954 vs. 1955 


AREA A (50-mile radius of Green 


Bay) 










J. MANITOWOC, WIS. 








25 


75 








2. OSHKOSH, WIS. 


80 


40 


60 


50 








3. APPLETON, WIS. 


80 


190 


75 


100 





100 


4. G1LLETT, WIS. 


40 


20 


150 


50 


10 





5. GREEN BAY, WIS. 


280 


530 


485 


260 





170 


6. MENOMINEE, MICH. 




















TOTALS A 


480 


800 


795 


535 


10 


270 


AREA B (50-100 mile radius 


of Green Bay) 










7. FOND DU LAC, WIS. 


50 


50 





10 








8. STEVENS POINT, WIS. 


70 


60 


90 











9. WAUSAV, WIS. 


100 





30 











10. NORWAY. MICH. 


70 


350 





375 





60 


11. SHEBOYGAN, WIS. 


20 


80 


10 


60 





20 


12. WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WIS. 


30 


30 


10 


10 








TOTALS B 


340 


570 


140 


455 





80 


TOTALS A & B 


820 


1.370 


935 


990 


10 


350 



Grand total second half June 1954: 1,765 DOZEN CANS 
Grand total second half June 1955: 2,710 DOZEN CANS 




tTelevlslon campaign began 24 January 1955 



56 



tor had changed in the market. Ergo 
it's television which has made sales 
jump. 

In each issue of SPONSOR since 21 
February a report has appeared on 
B&M sales compared with the same 
period last year without television. 
\\ ith some exceptions the pattern has 
been one of substantial increases for 
each period. In the period currentlv 
reported for example I see box at left i . 
B&M sales for the second half of June 
this year were 2.710 dozen vs. 1.765 
dozen last year. 

These statistics do not tell the entire 
story, however. Last year B&M gave 
grocers a 50c per case promotion al- 
lowance during the latter half of June. 
And there's no allowance this year. 
It's apparent therefore that exceeding 
a previous sales level which had been 
swelled by a promotion allowance rep- 
resents important progress. And more- 
over B&M sales for latter-June of 2.710 
dozen were 1,000 dozen over the first 
half of the month, an unexpectedly big 
jump since 1.700 dozen had begun to 
look like a plateau point for the prod- 
uct. 

The B&M test campaign is carried 
on WB AY-TV j Green Bay. and con- 
sists of six weekly announcements. 
mainly in afternoon and morning time. 
No merchandising or point-of-sale fol- 
low-through has been used. 

Sales are reported to sponsor exclu- 
sivelv as soon as they are tabulated by 
B&M's broker in the territory. Otto L. 
Kuehn Co. of Milwaukee. The figures 
represent sales at the wholesale level 
in 12 communities in the area covered 
by the station. • * * 

For back copies of SPO\SOR 
covering the entire test period, 
write to Sponsor Services Inc.. 40 
E. 49th St., ISetc York 17, N. I. 

SPONSOR 



TIMEBUYERS OF THE U. S. 

tisitui htj cities* <i<j<>u #•##** ttnti accounts 

During the past several years the number oi men and women engaged in timebuying has 

vastly increased. \t some ad agencies timebuying personnel has doubled .mil tripled overnight. 

Furthermore, timebuying personnel is known for frequent shifts from one account to anothei 

as well as frequent -hilt- to jobs outside the agency, rhe confusion in who handles what account, 

in who has moved, in who i- new i- one oi the problems oi .1 problem-beset industry. Some 

station representatives have worked hard to maintain thorough up-to-date lists oi timebuyers. 

Recentl) one such li-t. prepared by John K. Pearson Co., was generouslj made available to sponsor's 

reader-. This li-t contain- breakdowns of agenc) account supervisors and timebuyers 1»\ 

cities and account-. We |)iil»li-li this JKI'('() li-t in two parts. On the pages that follow are most 

New York li>tiii£>. Next i--ne 1 23 July) remaining New York and othei cit) listings will appear. 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS A PHONE TIMEBUYERS 
NrW VORK 

INDERSON * CAIRNS 

IHH W.i./i.f»>i l»m, ( JJ ). Ml 8-5000 



RlNltf, Mill. Ms / 

Martinson's ( offee ffe I <-.. \ v,( SBYDEL 



ITHERTON £ CI RRIEB 

Hr\ III trill ] 

( ut ic tn .i Soap "' BFBT 
>\\ I I 1 
Scott's Emulsion | 

V W. IYER & SON 

SO ■•caW/aibr I'l. (JO). II O.OJOO 

M PI K\ IM)K ( H \R1 Is \| \\ II lis 



I in mi ( ompania \.1\ . Pgm 

Atl.nitu Rcli 

Ohio Oil 



Pgm. 1 
ning \ 



Blt.I. 

< ROASDALE 



B. < Remed] / mr- a UNt 
loliii-.m \ Johnson \ <»ia E 

N itional Dair; Products ] 
Insurance Co of North America JEANNE 
( harles I Hires s«n v\ 
Yardley ol I ondon | 

SI 'PERVISOR - RICHARD B l NB1 R1 

Hill- Bros. ( offee "1 
Plymouth l)i\. - ( hryslei K2SS25 

I nitotl Air Lines J 

Knouse I 
Seabrook Farms ,. x , , KI/n . 

1 ast) Baking | BERGF.B 

/ii>i>n Manufacturing J 

( hryslei / H(I , N 
Plymouth Co-op \ n vRi K IG 

Bill Telephone 1 

Illinois Bill ! M \RGF 
Michigan Bell FREEH v\ 
Reuben H Donnelrj | 

TED BATES £ CO. 

KM Fifth In, (30), Jl t,.ot,iM 

SIPERVISOR - ED SMALL 

ite-Palmolive 1 ' '"•"- 
Dental Cream, Octagon Products, ! ' p au | 
Palmolive Soap. Palmolive Shave [ Rcar-Hon* 
c ream v 1 otion) I Charlie 

J Thri--' 

• \--i>tanl 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS & PHONE TIMEBUYERS 



( ontini mi il Baking 1 K( n ( m k i 

II., I, l.r.l 

si I I RV1SOR - Mil MIIK.in 

Brown v Williamson gjjfJknj, 

R J"" N 

-INMH I 



JOI 

-IN 



(Viceroj v rube Rose Snufl \','! !M , ^, 

. i. Mr - I r It 

( lis ( olumbia, Inc. ] _ llM 
(tv sets Ife-recelvers i n -on 
Standard Brands R.n.il Desserts, t Dan 

Blur Bonnei Margarine) | Monahan* 

M I'l RVISOR - M \( DUNBAR 

\inri u .in ( hitlr ( Brrin.m \ IVp-in. I |,,,N 

C bidets, Rolaids \ < " wm \s 

Anahist i Vnahist, Misl o pin-. / . in i 

Supi i Vnahisl j SI « BAI «.n 

( .ii iii Produi ts (< I CAMERON 

N lir, \iu.l Spraj De idoranl \ RICCINS 

Hawlej v H ops M8 \l ( andies fSo^sopi 

SI PI R\ 1SOR [OHN HAICHT 

American Sugar Refining Domino. 
I ranklin v Sunn] < an S t 

I i.inr | 

V - S ' Kill « VKNHi 

"■ StOn P .lark 

Ricr. Kitchen Bouq I Dougherty* 

Minute Maid frozen fruil i 
Morton Pa< king frozen mi 

1 1 im i il 

l.iNN li\KKR. INC. 

TJO Tiftk !■. (/•'/. /( 6-3900 



Puss N Boots < at l burak V 



BBDO 

Mil HmdUom !••■■ (17), H SS900 

(.KOI P Hi \l> Mr \oRI •>( VM W 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS A PHONE TIMEBUYERS 

B M 

.IINI.IU 

Gem t ,! Electrii I imp 1 

iking j 






-I \N| \ N 



(.KOI P III \l> HOP! M \K I INI/ 

-I n v iniu 
K, v ill llrug J 



(.KOI I- HI Ml \R I IUVI \ 



v< Kit 



B ""; n " Ml- Ji 
igton \uii- H(h>RI 

Ml I I Ml I 

Level Brothi i- Surf, B 

HISS MM kl ^ 

Ethyl M< Mil BAB 

(.Riil P HI \h l ROW BRIDC1 H I IM \n 

I S 

H M MM \N 

I \\ \ 



IKIIW 

BRI I" I 



(.KOI I- III Mi III) W M I OWIR 






■ 



Miin 

l i i \ i i \ Ml 



05. Y. Si 



,, mii mo n 

PADOI v 

HI Ml I 

"t 1 1 HKMi 
CMM.S » 
I 5 

GROUP n M 

Curii* Publn ^| vri i v 

H l.nuii 

(.KOI p HI M) GI v I RL'DI Sf \M vn 



, K .),' > 



uia* ik 



11 JULY 1955 



57 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS, ADDRESS i PHONE TIMEBUYERS AG ENCY, ACCOUNT S. ADD RESS & PHON E TIMEBUYERS AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS 4 PHONE TIMEBUYERS 



VICTOR A. BENNETT 

511 Fifth Ave. (17), Ml 7-2106 

Longines Wittnauei 
BENTON & BOWLES 

/// Madison Ave. (22), ML' 8-1100 
General F I~ 



EDWARD 
KAHN 



\SSO< MFDIA D1RK.IOR-M. l><>\(>\\\ 

VSST. MEDIA DIK (cereals) I. MAHON 

\ss|. MI IMA 1)IR. (coffees) - B. BALDWIN 



Diamond Crystal Salt } 
( laines Don Food I 

Post Toasties 

Post Tens 

Raisin Bran 

Suj;ai Crisp 

Bran Flakes 

Corn Fetti 

Grape Nuts 

Grape Nut Flakes 

Krinkles 

Wheat Meal 



TOM MAHON 



KILL 
MURPHY 



Instant Maxwell House Coffee 1 

General Foods- \ GRACE 

PORTERFIELD 



Inst. &.- Misc. 



Whirl < BEN davis 



Diversified Product* (1) 



\ss()( . Ml 1)1 A DIK 
ASST. MEDIA DIR. 



M. KII -111 I R 
S. HAVEN 



Benson fe Hedges ~) 

Florida Citrus I ERANK 

I CARVELL 



Johnson & Co. 

Norwich Pharmacal (Pcplo- Bismol 

Buckeye Cellulose 

Grove Labs 

Mutual of N.Y. 

Pream 

Pepperell Mfg. 

Carlin^ lit <-w ing 
Diamond Mate h 
Gen. Electric | 

1 
Contimcntal Oil ' 



HELEN 
KOWALSKY 



DICK TREA 



FRANK 
I.IONETTE 



Diversified Products (2) 



ASSOC. MEDIA DIR. 
ASST. MEDIA DIR. 



E. BOWMAN 
D. HARRIS 



Benrus Watch J.**? 



TARCHER 



SlI'rKVISOR - FIHEI. WIEDER 



Procter & Gamble (Fluffo, 1 KEARNS 
Spi< it Span, Shasta) I Dorothy 

Houghey * 
STATION RE1.A TIONS MGR. - DON SEVERN 

CAYTON 

9 East 40th St. (16), LE 2-1711 



] HY 
Cbesebrougfa Mfg. Co. l™ A j!™ ALL 



I DONNA 
J QUIGLEY 

CHRISTOPHER, ALLEN CO. 

30 East 60th St. (22), MV 8-944S 

"J LOUIS 
Various Mail Order Accounts L FICENWALD 
[LUCILLE 
) DREHER 

CARL S. BROWN CO. 

630 Fifth Ave (20), PL 7-4610 

MEDIA DIRECTOR - HERB STOTT 

Sterling Drug (Dr. Caldwell, Fletcher's "1 

Castoria. Z B I Bab) Powder) [ ROSE marie 
Colonial Sugar f VITANZA 
Hal O 



THESE ARE 



AMONG PEARSON 



MEN WHO GATHERED 



TIMEBUYERS LIST 




JOHN E. PEARSON 
President 



RUSS WALKER 
Vice President, \.Y. 



BILL WILSON 
Vice President, IS.Y. 



Bliss Coffee ") 
Regular Maxwell House Coffee I BREN 



Yuban Coffee 



Procter & Gamble 



! BALDWIN 



ASSOC. MEDIA DIR. - LEE RICH 
ASST. MEDIA DIR. (case goods) -RAYMOND HEALY 
ASST. MEDIA DIR. (drug brands) - LEE CURRLIN 

BERN KANNER 
1 lde r Grant Jacks* 

J Joe I .ii.ii. II. 

Ivory Snow I TO NY LEE 

1 
Crest J. DON FOOTE 

J 

1 
Zest rJOE FANELI 



Secret I j A y' 
Canada (All Products) j WASSERMAN 

1 
Prell & Pin-It l. TOM CARSON 

) 



American Express ] 

Assn. of American Railroads 

Cigar Inst, of America 

French Govt. Tourist Office 

Railway Express 

Studebaker 

IBM 



BOWMAN & 
f HARRIS 
(temporarily) 



BERMINGHAM, CASTLEMAN & PIERCE 

136 East 38th St. (16), LE 2-7550 

1 
Griffin Polishes J. BOB RO WELL 



BIOW-BEIRN-TOIGO 

640 Fifth Ave. (19), PL 9-1717 
V.P. & DIRECTOR RADIO/TV 



JOHN KICERA 



Philip Morris Tobacco Co. Ltd. 
Armstrong Rubber 



ISABELLE 
ZIEGLER 
GERARD VAN 
HORSON 

Sol Israel* 



American Home Products'] 
Bond Clothing Co. I 
Knickerbocker Beer | AL SESSIONS 
Natl Shawmut Bank 



Pepsi -Cola 
Hudson Pulp & Paper 



SAM VITT 



BUCHANAN & CO. 

1501 Broadway (36), BR 9-790O 



Paramou 



Eskimo Pies ) iuj 
ant Pictures j IP 



ILDRED 
INGVALL 



CALKINS & HOLDEN 

247 Park Ave. (17), PL 5-6900 

MEDIA DIRECTOR -THOMAS YOUNG 

Oakite ") 
Stokely-Van Camp Food ( TIMOTHY 
Preen | O'LEARY 
Prudential ] 

HARRY B. COHEN ADVERTISING CO. 

41 East 42nd St., OX 7-0660 

HEAD TIMEBl YFR-BETH BLACK 



Block Drug (Amm-i-dent, Green 

Py-co-pay, 
Groves Labs (Four Wa\ Cold Tablets, j ] 
Fitch Shampoo. Fitch Ideal Hair Tonic) J 



n Mint. "| 
Nytol) | 



Glim ] 
Black Draught [ ARTHUR 
UticaClubBc.er|H R ARR.SON iER 

I \.l:. j Pinkham | 



58 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS A PHONE TIMEBUYIHS 



COMPTON ADVERTISING INC. 

Jl.l »»„,/,.,.„ I,. . <>\ 7 J Itit) 

HIM) Ol HI I' I Ml MO I I IK III SM 

im. COORDINATOR Kl I II |om^ 

I'r... I. r A I. IRlbl* 



( I IM .1 J 

[von ' lakes \ 



I. It VII Ol IU1 



Dwh / Hum it i 
Dn nc \ I IDDB 

"'" / HHII 
Clean \ mi i i ii. vn 

[von v "i> / i HELDA 
Sterling Drug 1 1 Izrln) \ i ORDANI 

Standard Brandi / CENEVIEV1 
Personal Product! (Yea! Issui - j -< HI BER1 

( IllM V Yllllml [1 ( OffCC I 

[nttani Chase t Sanborn Coffei hi gEMEl 

1 ,11.1.1 1., ii i. i \i in rim 
Instant I endei leal rea 



M K '-" ,l " «i SaSJen 



A(. I NCY. ACCOUNTS A D H E SS A CH ON E TIMEBUVIHt 



I. Kill I' Ml HI V III \l> [OHN I I ( IN \ M I I I 



Supri Coola ,M "° 

-nt \i.i l 



GROI P mi in \ in vn i mv \'-ii n\( /i vviki 



N 1 1 1 1 * 1 1 1 1 1 . I '. 



III! I. V \ I S 



DANCER-FITZGER iLD-SAMPI I 

117 tf.i./i ..... I..- (17 i. IIH 9-O6O0 

\«ik MEDIA DIKH [OR Kl\ lORCERSON 

I II VNK 

Villi II. .Ml ( III. '• ||I>VV | | , , 

i.l II I 1(1 III 
IllM- I N 

r- ,v.,,' BOB 

Gene il M lb „, ,, HO rsi 

(.illl.l \\ ,n. I IllM I 
I H II- I 

VSSOI MEDIA DIREI TOR IKMNi. slnVN 



p.... i. i v (..iiiii.i, Oxydol Si^Si tt ' 



II VU I M 



% 

I) \ltl 1 \l»\ I It I l-IM. ( i. 
( iii Pari i 

(KIM M VII- 



' 



II M MUIIMI 



III RSI III I /. Ill I I -» II A I II. 

W.,,1, I. . ( Pi II 71111 

I I | 

hold Produi u Sulfui B) 
I andi i < •■ 1 1 ■ ■ ' 



mniiiiM 

\l I l-UN 
II... 



niiiii i; n. < i ii i nidi, -niif- a 
SHENI II I I) 

i .a > ,/,/, i,. | / | M v./.i i . 

Mi III \ DIREI HIH DON Ql inn 
Vllillnn > Powdd 
Bi 

Vitall 
Dull Baking M iii-.iN 

I'li.it i , i 

, M digUITl 



II IIHI 




itvi hin/i 

Irrtmnt F.xiTlttitf. V). 



KH VNK KM II 
I at- Prmaldent, I /,,»„-., 



JIM ItuU III N 

t iff I'ri-Mil.nl . Mmnt'iifntli . 



milt ii \ iiiii 

I ,. . I'r. .i.l. m. III. ml., 



ROBERT < ON Ml \Y & ASSOC! \ IKS 

J 7ii Pari Im., El. S-hOlT 



Chesape 



sake \ Ohio ; 



in n:, nin E. 

Mil II V-l (> 



CI NNINGHAM & WALSH 

->*<» UmdUon Im. I Ho. WJ 3-4900 
V.P. & MF. D1 \ DIRE CTOR - NEWMAN F. McEVOY 
GROUP MEDIA HEAD -WILLIAM WHITE 
Colgate-Palmolive / , „ VHI , .. 
Eversharp \ BELFRICB 

1 
I \. Folgo JIM DUCEI 

J 

E. R Squibb \ WILLIAM 
Universal Pictures \ « hite 



Northwest Urlines 



J 



J M K i;iEBEI 



CROIP MEDIA HEAD -JEROME FEXIGER 

lltltt Mill 
Liggett i-Mvcrv .^J|!j KS 
I MOREM \ 



mbli hi. n pete - \M vn 
J 

Besi I I- Nucoa gjjjj™ ^ 



Hellman's Mayonnaisi '■[ ^' 

\i pi w it ^ 

I ev. i- Howi 1 u hi- 

Peter Paul j 
VSSOf Ml Dl \ DIRK KIR 1 1> M III KM K 






ifl Brewing ,,„ pTEVILU 

J 

vss m mi in \ niRM urn i oi is hm \\\ r 



I It \Nk 

Sterling Drug Bayei Vspirin M 7,7«. U< " 

IKlltklN 

iwell U % *' "* 



Cental 



-n\in 

II VMIK 



Borden - Instanl < LEE CAYMOI 

DON Mil I A < 01 

I.Tll -, Ml, i iii .-J77J 



I MUM > N 

BurlniElDii Mill- !," t ." M „ 

II \K II X H V 
Di •«• Ii" mini - 

. M (. M Mill n 

FHErfM, 

I IIIIKI1 

DOW Ii. Kl Dl II III & JOHNSTON! 

loi \i,,.i,..,n I.. .-■ >n %-tm 



BI,M k 



Centui 



II VN 1. 1| fiun 



MMIl MNN 



DOYI \ . KIM III N a M.( ilKMIi K 

. ; , nh Im i 17 i. Ml TJ0M 



Mathieson Chcmit a: * ^"J N 



11 JULY 1955 



59 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDKESS & PHONE TIMEBUYERS AG E NC Y. ACCOU NTS. AO D RESS 4 PH ON E TIMEBUYERS AG ENC Y. ACCOU NTS. AD D RESS & PH ON E TIMEBUYERS 



ROY S. DURSTINE 

655 Madison Ave. (21). TE 8-4600 



Strong Hi an Dog Food / u VNM 

Flako \ MacM INI S 



ELLINGTON <V CO. 

535 Fifth Ave. (17), Ml 7-4300 
DIK. R VDIO I \ HMEBUYING 



n \\ K \\l 



i la te e i 
Cities Servio , Nl 
M< Kesson v Robbins | SM MIIERS 
Red Stat Brand Yeasi 



\\ I l.l.l \M ESTY CO. 

100 East t2nd St. (17). OX 7-16()(l 

HEAD_TIMF.mil R K!( HARD GRAHL 

Ballantine Beer "| jack house 
( ol i ii Pa'm ilive I l ab, Vel, I ' VNN WILSON 
D . , el PRANK 

'■■' " :| Sluu ' 1 I MUION 

Gem r Mills s i .,, j e ts I "" ( i in i o\ 
Soft .. silk i '•' N " 
National Carbon (Evereadj I | (>> , pi«e 
Batteries, Prestone Vnti-Freeze) j TOM HOL- 
Pacquins Hand ( ream I LWGSHEAD 
1 HA I. 



SIMPSON 



R.J. Reynolds 
ERWIN, WASEY & CO. 

120 Lexington Ave. (17), LE 2-8700 

MEDIA DTRECTOR - KEITH SHAFFER 

Admiral ] 

Barbasol | 

Dulanei Frozen Foods f HAL DAVIS 

Musterole I 



FOOTE, CONE * BELDLNG 

247 Park Ave. (17), MU S-5000 

DIRECTOR OF MEDIA - ARTHUR PARDOLL 

B.O.A.C. 1 
Lever Bros. (Sprv. Shie'd) I " F ' TE 

RheingoldBee, | BARDACH 

1 
Paper-Mate Pen I, P ™NY 

. SIMMONS 

ALBERT FR4NKG1 ENTHER LAW 

131 Cedar St., CO 7-5O60 



Riplingei 's Changing Times I. F,t;TTV 
.' MELSON 



II LI.ER & SMITH & ROSS 

230 Park Ave. (17), MV 6-5600 

Aluminum Corp. of America ] 
Commercial Solvents Corp. | 

Hercules Powder Co. I BERNIE 
Sherwin-Williams Paint Co.'| RASM USSEN 

Wcstinnhousc I 



(EVER ADVERTISING 

711 Fifth Ave. (22), PL 1-3300 

American Home Products ) BETTY 
Vmei iC in Motoi j POWELL 

Kelvinator | 

' SLEEPER 



Kiwi Polish I. CAROL 
I etley Tea J 

GREY ADVERTISING AGENCY 

430 Park Ave. (22), PL 1-3S0O 

SUPERVISOR - HELEN WILBUR 

\ i-lant 



Block Drug | Polident, Sentrol) L PHIL 

< BRANCH 

( limk Full O Nuts / \i\iuo\ 
5 I). iv Deodorant I'.uK \ JON1 S 

1 



Necchi Sewing Machines | jL9i™ N . 



A I DA 
STEARNS 



M. IL HACKETT CO. 

•> Rockefeller I'l. (20), CI 6-1950 

Vmei k .in I ob; 

He i berl I areytons 
Hershey Chocolate < " | 

HICKS & GREIST 

120 Lexington Ave., MV 6-6800 

Glamorene Rug Cle a / kileen 

l)i\n ( up j < I HMINCS 

Lewyt Vacuum Cleaners l 

Broil-Quick Rotisseries ) VINCENT 

Serve! Refi igerators | DARAIO 
Si i vel \n Conditioners 

BRYAN HOUSTON 

10 Rockefeller PI. (20), PL 7-6400 

MEDIA DIRECTOR -HAROLD DOBBERTEEN 
SUPERVISOR ON NESTLE PROD. - JOHN ENNIS 

Colgate-Palmolive (Halo, ] 
Chlorophyll Toothpaste, Ajax Cleanse] . I 

Cashmere Bouquet Cosmetic Line, iohn 
Cashmere Bouquet Soap, Cashmere ! COLLINS 
Bouquet Beauty Bar, Toothpowders- ' 
Regular, Ammoniated, Chlorophyll) 



Nescafe 
Nestle's Instant Coffee 

Shave Creams ] 
Veto 



FRANCES 
JOHN 



, BOB LILIEN 

J. P. Stevens | 

Gunther Beer j 

CHARLES W. HOYT CO. 

380 Madison Ave. (17), MV 2-2000 

American Home Products j 

(G. Washington Codec i | 
Colgate-Palmolive (Kirkman Soaps) 

Mail Pouch Tobacco (-DOUG HUMM 
Merck | 
Monticello Drug (6fiS Products) j 



LAWRENCE KANE 

171 Madison Ave.. MV 5-7216 



"I 



Waverh Fabrics | TOM NEEFUS 



KASTOR. F4RRELL, CHESLEY & 
CLIFFORD 

40O Madison Ave. (16), PL 1-140O 

Dr. Pierce's Proprietai ies I 

Jeris Hair Ionic !■ j ACK PE TERS 
Lite-Diet Bread I 



KEN YON & ECKHARDT 

217 Park ive. (17), ML 8-5700 

MEDIA DIRECTOR- JOSEPH P. BRAUN 
ASST. MEDIA DIRECTOR - PHILIP KENNEY 

1 
Vmerican Maize (AMAZO) j. mary iiw > i i; 



Ford Motor ] tom 
Lincoln-Mercury (Network Spot) ] .VISCARD1 

Hudnut ( osmetics I MARY DWVER 



Menne 



n (Men's I in. > | {-.°*i 



KENNEDY 



National Biscuit I LARRY 
< DONINO 



RCA / LVCY 

Schick l KKR* IN 



KELLY, NASON 

2 17 I'nrk ive. '17). Ml 8-S3O0 



\ merit an I sprcss I 

HenryH eide URTH™ 



Kuiiitiinl ( 0. 



DERMOD1 



EDWARD KLETTER ASSOCIATES 

515 M adit on Ive. (22), PL 1-1990 

RADIO/TV BUS. MGR. - HERBERT GRUBER 
Pharmaceutii als, [nc. i 

Serutan , { , -,-,, B AYER 
[ournal of I.i\ ing J 

KUDNER AGENCY 

575 Madison Ave.. (22), Ml 8-6700 

] 



(.eneial Mot. us cBuitkl I {°"* „ 

1 . 

Texaco Products j. Ann , 

Gar<lin«-r* 



Collier's I JfHIN 

C [ Ml Kl'HY 



LAMBERT & FEASLEY 

430 Park Ave. (22), MV 8-6464 

MEDIA DIRECTOR- JOE BURLAXD 



1 .Hubert Pharmacal Co. ~| 
Philgas 
Phillips t:t: ( as and Oil 



p,,,, -.LLIAM 



C. J. LaROCHE AND CO. 

247 Park Ave. (17), PL 5-7711 

RADIO fc TV MGR. -STUART P. LUDLUM 

1 
U.S. lobacco }. borbI BF.RGII 

J 

LENNEN & NEWELL 

380 Madison Ave. (17), MV 2-5400 

MEDIA SUPERVISOR -GEORGE KERN 
Colgate-Palmolive (Lustre-Creme, ~| 
Pruf) | 
Dorothy Graj Ltd. | 1EAN JAFFEE 
1 elm & I ink Products ( I.vsol) J 

MEDIA SUPERVISOR C \. BROCKER 



l mi i hi Drug ( Bromo-Se'. tzei i I 
Schlitz Brewing j 



H'< lltRU H. 
I \ MAN 



Minn SUPERVISOR -WILLIAM 1). sMl 1 H 



1 
P. Lorillard Co. Inc. J. 

J 



DAVID J. MAHONEY 

261 Madison Ave. (16), OX 7-0480 

Garrett & Co (Virginia Dare Wines. 

Garretl \\ ines 

s; ai ks-Withington I Spat l in 

i.i.l i & i\ sets) 

CONKLIN MANN & SON 

342 Madison Ive. (17). II 6-55 77 

American Cyanamid- 

1 me ( he line als Hi'. . 
1 edei le Laboratoi ies Dh 



J. ROBERT 
W IDMOI.M 



ROGER 

Bl MSTEAD 



DICK M \NN 



1 
George W. Helm Co. Viking Snuff] ' 

J 



BOB PALMER 



60 



SPONSOR 



AMNCY. ACCOUNTS ADDHESS * PHONE TIMEBUVEH8 



M IRSCB M K 3 PR M I < <). 

V Hi, ..l M. I , ,, k.,,, 

■'/, I,.. I i: i, I I r,joj2 

Ml HI \ I > I K I ( [OR I I i.l \l I i in. \\ 

DON 

NUI " 

in \in 
i i i i i i 

J. M. MATH] - 

-''.» >'.,.' it. (/'. /. /» >.7450 

1 1 Di \ | 
I uden'i 
< arbola ( hi ml< .ii hrs. h>n v 9 

\..illi mi M mi. ii < v I III VIII 

I'm. I I 

u agni i Baking 

M WON 

11 lad 53rd Si. (»»), ri v.r<.r<. 

DIRK I or i)l k \l>!i> v i \ ED WILHEI.M 

( lllll. HI 1 OOOS I 

Gem ral Electric (tv receivers '•' '""■ , 

III II >H( 

\ ii placi mi mi lulu 1 | 



1 
(.ill. it. „ u STONE 

I 

H. I Hum/ I , m| 

Hoi Poinl \ M vi.i im 



McCANN-ERICKSON 

Ml H,.ck.-)rll,-r I'l. I'O). Jl I,. A IOO 

RADIO/TV SUPERVISOR -AL PETCAVAGE 

( rowel] ( olliei 
Holmes ft Edwards Silvei ( o. 

i ,i,ii v i ink I ' 5 VN| ! - 

Noi wegian ( anners \-mi | 
Seed. \ K.i.l, I', in i. | 

R \DIO I \ SI P] R\ |si)R III) kllM 



Barren l>i\ ision lllied ( hemical 

■..in ii 
I SSO PODEST1 I! 



( ongoleum 



mil .il i | 
Nairn , AN1 



M.in.l.ml Oil i.l \ I I'M I i I \HK 
National Bisi uil j 

RADIO TV St I'KPVTSQO -W11.1.1AM PFI I I \ / 

Chesebrough j ROBERT 

Owi ii. ( .Minim \ INDERSON 



Mi nil, ll 

I'.u iiu ( ...i-i Bora 



en ] 



Wilis 

Will VRI) 



Nes tie's | 

RADI O l\ SUPERVISOR Ml • u W ROFF1S 

\ mil u.m s.iti i\ R.i/i.i j 

B Ii Irich | 

Hood Rui. i.. i \-\ itu ^ 
lunkei Brand Foods ROl I IS 
\\ estinghouse | 
i i ilumbia Records | 

C. I.. MILLER CO. 

541 Fifth (if. (17). Ml 2-IOK) 

Corn Products Karo Syrup, Linit } MR s ki I v 
Starch, Mazota, Niagara Starch] I DRISCOL1 

EMU MOGUL CO. 

250 rati r,T,h >,. (!•>,. Jl 2-.-,20O 

BIS. MGR. RADIO & TV -LESLIE D l NIER 

R.iv... Seal ( overs 
Block Drug Ukaid, Minnipoc MNN 

Sham Poslam | " , ^ ,,,N " 

Esquire Boot Polish / M UNK 
Manischewitz Wine \ 54 ll ll iink 



All NCY. ACCOUNTS AOORESS k PMONI I I M I 11 

MOR] i in MM A JOHNSTON] 

■ to » ./>' / in i ■ ■ /.. 



, IMMMU KV ^ N 

-II l\MH\ 



MORSE IN II UN MION \l. 

i ■ / .... /_•,,./ -, (17), OX 1100 

Ml HI \ MAN AG I R ORRIN ( IIRIM V 

I \ .i i ... i ..I. \ .i ii. 

i • Co igh s\ rup, " v ^ 

M . \ I I I I 

JOHN I •'. Ml RR M \l)\. \(.l N( >. 
33 t ait full St. (17 J ll 8000 



\\ iiu. i>. ill rii.n in. i. al \ini i Mil i 
NOB1 E, \l BER I. — l ■ » - I 1 \D\ I KI IMN<, 

7,2 I mi. I., 1 , ill I,. I 17 I. Ml I..H7HII 

Mlii ,1 ( In nil, -i , |ll0 

,gen Division \ l t RCI SON 

OGILVY, BENSON 4 m \i HER, IN< . 

Miv Fifth !■■ i 1 7 1. Ml 8-6100 

MANAGER MARTIN K \\i 



II. Ii M. i Rubenstein I 

Level Brothi ' " VNK '•' 

N\l I VMM 

(Rin 

Level Brothi rs Good Luck) / ^ N 

Pi |.m ( ..i.i s. hwi |.|., • I JANOWICZ 



M, hill, Shot ( orp l h Mi Vn M wt i in 

KAN1 



Philip Morris! o. I i.l Dunhills) [ H' it-t ll iv«. 
PARIS & PEART 

:i7ii Lexington In . i I 7 i. VI 9-2 I ! ' 

MEDIA M W VGFR - WEYMOUTH SIM Ms 

(...ii \ v P Ira ] 

|..< I ..in Corp Popsii :. I . 

Km k\> 1 \ ( ..inp.iiH i In., olate : 

Spratt's dog loud) I 

PARKER 4DVETERJ INC. 

// ll nil (2nd Si. (36), d\ SSS6S 



1 
1 HWI IUIKI 

J 

Ulin, Housi ( .. 18 top hits ' " Uil ' M 
' 1 1 1 1* — ■ 



x 



nun i>i n i 

PRODI « l -l u\ i« I - GROI i 

MARTHA 



| 






KI \( II. It M 1 - A MM I i IO> 

i. i ii 

Ml HI \ M KM I OR Kll 

l . . I I I M 

III K III K I). KM II tRDS 

in «,,. /.. i. ii. , n i .•</ . ii !..!■■ 

I •. i 

MM KI I I \ 

■ ' 

KI I lilt Mil A It l \N 

in . I . tinmton Im ' / ." • <" '■ •'• >'••• 

III I UN I I 

Kn ■ 



\ i \i i 

ii. i i < \ 



, iii\ltn.ni 

• Olllll I I 



BEN SA< Mil IM \<-l N< n 
g ii , w -,7ii, Si (19) PI ' ■ ■"" 



I'.'-WllV \N 



>< III 11)1 I I K. KI ( K A 1 I KM It 
in 7 Park I. Ml 0-8366 

SUPERVISOR VI SEN 



i • 



\\N| 



Mi - - ^ 

Mi lllll nir. i 

.,in 

R| ^ v., I DS 

KI (.(.I! -• HI ! KM . INC 

7 tn.i I7ih Si ii '-778S 

PRES1D1 N I KM. (.11 SI HI I HI I 

II \N 

-I I I IV \N 



11 JULY 1955 



To be continued next Issue (2.» -lulu). Listing icifl 

iiK'fiifff* ► Rt'inaiiith'r of \cw ■ «r/» n ncn ci<c». ► ISiisttm 

► I'liiltnlrlphiu ► lttilti)iun-<' ► »| o v/iiii'/fon. It. i . ► If ic-/im«iif/ 

► Chivaao ► Cincinnati ► CIctTcInnii ► Detroit 1 

► >l i I «•« ii /»•«•«• ► St. I.oiii.v ► Ifinnennnlifl ► Itlnnte 

► Dallas ► f.o.s- tnr/<»f(>.v ► S'«n Fmnciscn 



61 



each 



one 



is 



different 











Fingerprints are different for no apparent reason — but 
the finest TV stations acquire their personalities 
from the needs and interests of the areas they serve. 

It stands to reason that quality TV stations 

want individualized representation. For them, 

the unique facilities of Harrington, 

Righter and Parsons have meant quality representation. 

If their league is yours too, then you'll want 

to find out what quality representation really offers. 



Harrington, Righter and Parsons, Inc. 

Nezv York 

Chicago 

San Francisco 

television — the only medium we serve 



62 



WAAM 


Baltimore 


WBEN-TV 


Buffalo 


WFMY-TV 


Greensboro 


WTPA 


I Iarrisburg 


WDAF-TV 


Kansas City 


WHAS-TV 


Louisville 


WTMJ-TV 


Milwaukee 


WMTW 


Mt. Washington 


WSYR-TV 


Syracuse 




SPONSOR 



4-' 



t 












' 






1955 I tl.l. FACTS I: ISIl S SECTIOH 





SPOT 



Rivalry for choice nighttime availabilities is at all-time high 
in fall liuying. Film commercial business booms in multi millions; 
spot film programs, features may top $60 million. Due this fall: 
more '"film networks" in spot field. Spot coverage starts page 64 



NIZTWORK 

Clearance- are improving as more stations go into majoi markets. 
Network costs are >till soaring merrily upward; this fall's "supei 
spectacular-" will break all monc\ records. There are more alter- 
nate week -how- than ever. Network coverage starts page iU> 



SPOT TV 



• Spot television will get the research tools it needs to build solidly 
as a major medium within one year. NARTB will push its television set 
count and circulation study, filling tv's greatest research gap. And publi- 
cation of dollar spending by spot advertisers is in offing. (For first list 
of spot spending by major clients as compiled by SPONSOR see page 49) 

• Watch early evening. The 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. period will be eagerly 
sought after this fall, probably second only to nighttime Class "A" block 

• Spot tv campaigns will last longer. Clients will strive for greater con- 
tinuity, compensating for costs by sharing spot-placed show sponsorships 
and by buying announcements in more available and less expensive periods 

• You can't assume for foreseeable future that nighttime will become 
easy to clear. But major clients with plans for extended campaigns will 
find it possible to clear time they want even where smaller clients fail 



Availabilities 

Q. Is spot tv time still tight at 
night? 

A. Tighter than ever, is the conclu- 
sion from a group of over 70 time- 
buyers and representatives surveyed. 

Reasons : 

1 1 1 Addition of new stations hasn't 
progressed on a large enough scale in 
the major markets to mean much. And 
I 2 I meanwhile the rush of new clients 
into spot tv has accelerated. One factor 
in keeping demand for nighttime spot 
at fever pitch is network programing 
co petition. The better the shows, the 
greater the demand for adjacencies. 

As things stand now, best bets are 
I.D.'s during prime evening time, al- 
though the) too are becoming increas- 
inglv hard to get. Also, it is somewhat 
easier to place 20-second announce- 
ments and I.D.'s in fringe evening 
time, an hour before and after network 
programing. During those periods. 
timebuyers can get minutes in most 
markets. 

There has been a trend toward heav- 
ier late night Inning around such net- 



work programing as NBC TV's To- 
night, and within late movies. Time 
within those periods is still obtainable, 
however, in most markets. 

The radio-tv business manager of 
one of the top five agencies comments 
that the toughest job in tv today is the 
problem of clearing a good evening 
half hour for syndicated films. "We 
still recommend half-hour film pro- 
grams to be placed market by mar- 
ket on a spot basis, but with the un- 
derstanding that there may be a long 
wait I from 13 to 26 weeks! to get 
the time." 

Generally, timebuyers feel that night- 
time tv is easier to buy into for the 
heavy-spending 52-weeks-a-year adver- 
tiser, than for the seasonal or small- 
budget client. Sa\s the head buyer of 
one of the top three radio-tv agencies : 
"Nighttime tv tends to be SRO for the 
small advertiser particularly. The big 
ones with enough monev to buy for 
\ car-round, can eventually get in. 



Q. What's the daytime picture? 
A. Timebuyers can virtually write 
their own ticket. 



This is the consensus among buyers 
surveyed: 111 Morning and afternoon 
is wide open. ( 2 I Early evening is be- 
coming more popular, though there's 
still the rush into prime nighttime. The 
5-7:00 p.m. period may be con- 
sidered the big bargain of fall 1955, 
and may tighten up considerablv by 
September. I 3 ) There's considerable 
interest in Saturday afternoon football 
and special sporting events by adver- 
tisers with male-appeal products, and 
orders are being placed earlv. (4) 
Cereal, soft drink and candy advertis- 
ers have a stronghold on the kid pro- 
graming blocks, late weekday after- 
noons and Saturday mornings. Since 
these times are becoming increasing!) 
popular, they're also tighter than last 
year. 1 5 ) There's little rush to buy 
Sundays. (6) The ABC affiliates are 
emerging as real contenders in the 
daytime picture because of the late- 
afternoon Disnev Mickev Mouse show. 

Daytime tv is still a different me- 
dium from nighttime tv. For one thing, 
there's a far greater turnover of adver- 
tisers. Some clients go into the fringe 
times in the hope of moving into night- 
time eventually. Other advertisers «o 



64 



SPONSOR 



into da) lime in ordei to t < - 1 1 .1 com 
plete 1 <>[>\ Btorj and gel the benefit "I 
lull minute demonstrations, w hi li are 
mi! nl the question < I n ■ ing ( lass " \ 

I illlC. 

I here are cei tain buj - dui ing week- 
days thai are snapped up first. I ■"■ 
example : dayl ime minutes nexl to 
high-rated afternoon f 1 1 1 1 1 — . Audience 
Btudies have Bhown thai mam women 
tend i" regulate their housework in 
-111 li a waj as i" Free .1 couple oi 

hours "I the aftei n for i\ \ iew ing 

1 particuhu l\ _'• I :mii p.m. before the 
kid- clinic home and ii - time to Btarl 
cooking ' . 

\ "famil) -\ icw ing" period thai is 
being encouraged b) network pro- 
graming, but which i- -till building 
slowl) where advertiser demand is 
concerned is the 7-9:00 a.m. time 
slot. NBC rV's Today show and the 
currentl) revamped CBS TV Morning 
Shou have managed to raise this pe- 
1 iod out <>l (>l>li\ ion. Advertise] re- 
sponse to it is -till slow, hut demand 
for minute- and 20's during earl) 
morning i- certainl) up over lasl Fall. 
Availabilities, however, arc varied and 
good. 

Buyers are keeping an eye on fall 
daytime plans, particularl) at NBC 
where soap opera is being deempha- 
sized in favor ol participation shows. 
(For a chart of the fall television line- 
up, da) and night, see pages 90-95.) 



Q. Is there any significant change 
in the unit of time that advertisers 
are seeking for their fall tv cam- 
paigns? 

A. Several trend- are beginning to 
emerge. 

1. I.D.'s, although considered a 
challenging form <>t commercial to do 
right by man) agenc) cop) depart- 
ments, continue t<> increase in popu- 
larity, particularl) for established 
products and as reminder < :op) ; this 
i< a reflection of the tight nighttime 
situation. \nd more agencies are 
learning to pack a lot of sell into those 
tew seconds, as in the case oJ notable 
i.D. campaigns like Maxwell House, 
Kools. Schaefer Beer and Bulova. 1 \ 
proposal for an I.D. campaign was an 
important factor in winning an account 
for an agency recently. Benton ^ 
Bowles suggested Florida Citrus Com- 
mission spend about S2 million for 
I.D.'s in a presentation in competition 



HOW BUYERS VIEW SPOT TV FOR FALL 




ji;iu;\i) n. srn tGl /: 

Cunningham & Walsh, A 

•| 1 i ,,u'\ e been noti< ing the big 1 rend 

toward I.D.'s, don'l think ol il in 

tii in- ol ,i\ ailabilities onl) . I.D.'s 

are far 1 heaper, about 60' I ol 20 s, 

besides hem- mine available. 




ORRII\ CHRIST! 

Mi - International, New York 

•( in rentl) < lients are reevaluating 

the lower-rated, lower-pri< ed Class '"l> 

adjacent ies be ause the) re finding 

ratings need not mean sales effe ti\e- 

lie—. The bi<i trend i> to daytime." 



BILL KENNED! 

1 B \ ' 

I ii - 1 new -i.ii ■■ 
-till 1 1 hi li in I' 11 
1 ions h ive gone on in 
station mat kets mainl) . Bui • I 
Foods o-|,i-i 1 dl\ . Inn moie da) lime 




J0.4.Y Ri TM IA 

I , ; ■ Sew 1 orh 

"Clients and - have found thai 

n, 1 •- fai more brand-* ona ious 

than adult-. I herefore, I ite- ifternoon 

u |, \l ki ■ M 

l!..\ Rog( rs adja 

ona <\<\\ time t\ - besl b 1 




11 JULY 1955 



65 






Spot fr 



with five other agencies — and got the 
business. I 

Up to a year ago the advertiser who 
used I.D.'s had to imprint the station's 
call letters on his film commercial. As 
more l\ stations went on the air, the 
expense became considerable. Adver- 
tisers complained about this added ex- 
pense to the 4A's, and then in June 
1954 Station Representatives Associa- 
tion stepped into the breach with a 
new proposal: the full-screen I.I). 
This allowed advertisers the full screen 
without station call letters for eight 
seconds, followed by two seconds of 
video for the station's identification. 
Since the end of June 1954, acceptance 
of the SRA standard I.D. has reached 
virtually 100% among tv stations. 

2. As local daytime programing has 
improved, timebuyers have become 
more interested in women's participa- 
tion shows, local sporting events, local 
quiz and tips programs. There's still 
a lot of skepticism to be overcome, be- 
cause few local tv personalities have 
been on the air long enough to make 
as much of a name for themselves with 
the agency men as the more established 
radio personalities. However, daytime 
minutes within participation shows are 
in greater demand certainly this sea- 
son than last. 



Buying tips 

Q. When's the right time to start 
shopping for a fall spot tv cam- 
paign? 

A. Right now, if not sooner. In ra- 
dio, traditionally the heaviest buying 
month was August. In tv, buying 
started later because the fall cam- 
paigns generally went on the air later. 
But the trend has been to earlier and 
earlier placing of orders. Now fall tv 
buying is in full swing during July; 
availabilities are looked over as early 
as June. 

This trend toward requesting avail- 
abilities earlier is found at large 
agencies and small. It seems to be the 
result of two self-contradictory condi- 
tions: (1) the continued scarcity of 
Class "A" nighttime availabilities; (2) 
the fact that many new stations are 
eager for sales to amortize the expen- 
diture of building the station and 
therefore have extended the customary 
30-day period during which avails are 
held to 60 and even 90 days in some 
instances. This means that a timebuyer 



can place an order In June on some 
stations to go <>n the air during Sep- 
tember. 

I!I!I )( ) s Gertrude Scanlan, who l>n\ s 
for \\ ildroot, buys evening tv only. 
Says she, "I try to place orders as 
earl) as possible in July to go on the 
air in the fall. That's one wav of get- 
ting »ood schedules." 

Kenyon & Eekhardt timebuyer Tom 
\ iscardi says that availabilities for fall 
were being requested early in June at 
K&E: "It's been done a little earlier 
each year. Today a buyer really has 
to get on line a couple of months 
ahead at least, if he's trying to get a 
new account into nighttime." 

Walter Bowe, SSCB timebuyer, be- 
lieves a nighttime tv advertiser today 
has to buy on a 52- week basis: "If he 
relinquishes a nighttime franchise, 
there'll be five advertisers behind him 
waiting to get on the air, and willing 
to buy longer schedules." 



Q. What are buyers doing in or- 
der to get good nighttime tv slots? 

A. There's no one answer, but a 
good relationship with reps and sta- 
tion men is always important. Savs 
D-F-S' Cliff Botway: "It's a question 
of negotiating with reps and knowing 
station managers. ' 

"If you decide to build to a certain 
quota of frequency as times open up 
over the space of several months, you 
can generally work up to the desired 
schedule," says Ogilvy, Benson & Ma- 
ther buyer Ann Janowicz. "Late fall, 
the peak season, is the toughest to buy. 
It's best to start in July or August to 
build a nighttime schedule. But for 
advertisers with short-term aims, this 
is an expensive investment." 

Cunningham & Walsh buyer Jerry 
Sprague says that, though stations 
generally seem to favor large clients 
with prime nighttime avails, they do 
like to get in new accounts. Adds he: 
"Priority lists are important in getting 
into nighttime tv. Generally, one has 
to take what one can get and then wait 
to improve one's schedule as time goes 
on. Of course, while you're waiting, 
vou're frequently in touch with the 
rep and station." 

Opinion differs about the priority 
lists. Some buyers feel that buying 
Class "B" in the hope of getting Class 
"A" is the soundest way of building 
franchises. Others maintain that once 
an account's on the station, the rep has 
little reason to improve their schedule 



and is more likely to sell the good 
limes to new clients. 



Kates 



Q. How much of a rate increase 
can advertisers anticipate for fall? 

A. Among 157 stations responding 
to a sponsor sur\ey of the 420-plus 
I .S. tv stations, 80 stations plan to 
maintain their rates at the present lev- 
el. The 41 stations that are putting 
through rate increases for fall, plan 
to raise rates by an average 20 c /c • 
One station anticipates an increase of 
50' J, -ix are planning increases of 
25' < . Only two stations mentioned 
that they were planning to lower their 
rates (daytime). Both of these sta- 
tions are in former one-station mar- 
kets. 

Reps state that generally, tv rates 
will be "a little higher"' this fall. They 
feel the increases will be spread 
equally over morning, afternoon and 
evening, a survey indicated. The in- 
creases will occur mainly in markets 
where number of tv homes is growing 
and for stations which are increasing 
their power. 



Q. Are there any volume-pur- 
chase plans in spot tv? 

A. There's a substantial increase in 
the number of "plans," which offer 
discounts to clients for buying a cer- 
tain minimum frequency quota per 
week. These station "12 Plans" and 
"5 Plans" and other forms of incen- 
tives are designed mainly to encour- 
age advertisers to go into daytime tv. 
Discount offers range up to 45 T off 
the one-time rate. 



Business outlook 

Q. What is the business outlook 
for tv stations in fall 1955? 

A. There was a 30% increase in 
1954 spot tv billings I S189 million I 
over 1953 i 145.4 million!. All but 
three of the 157 respondents to spon- 
sor's station survey expected to see 
substantial increases in local, national 
spot and network business. Ninety-five 
stations are expecting a 10-25% in- 
crease in national spot business on the 
basis of orders placed so far for fall 
and apparent trends. Eighty-four 



66 



SPONSOR 



WORKING 
PART 




RADIO 



*£££# n 



LEVISION 




FRANK HEADLEY, President 
DWIGHT REED, Vice President 
FRANK PELLEGRIN, Vice President 
CARLIN FRENCH, Vice President 
PAUL WEEKS, Vice President 



Orders are "sweet music" to radio and TV station 
owners and they rightly expect their representatives 
to produce them. But to do this takes skill and the 
selling "know-how" that comes only with long 
experience. We feel that H-R is unusual in this 
respect because this organization was founded by a 
group of working partners all with long and 
successful backgrounds in this field. And — as we 
have grown — only those with similar backgrounds 
and ability have been added to our staff. Thus 
today, as when we started, "We Always Send a 
Man to Do a Man's Job." 



380 Madison Ave. 
New York 17, N. Y. 
OXford 731 20 



35 E. Wocker Drive 
Chicago 1 , tllinois 
RAndolph 6-6431 



Horold lindley. V.ce Pres. 
6253 Hollywood Boulevard 
Hollywood 28. Calif. 
HOIIywood 7-1480 



James Altpaugh, Mgr. Clarke R. Bro-n. Mgr. 

155 Montgomery Street 452 Rio Grande Nationol Bldg. 

San Froncisco. Calif. Dollos, Te.os 

YUkon 2-5701 Randolph 5149 



Bill McRoe. Mar. 

101 Mo- "••- StTMl Building 

A- - - 'a. Georgio 

Cypress 7797 



Jock lee Mfi 

520 lo'ft la 
Room No. 10 

- Teios 
Justin 1601 



Spot fr 



In Portland, Maine . . . 
and in northern New England 

They Watch 

WCSH-TV . . . MOST 



per ARB study for Cumberland County 
May 25-31, 1955 

Number nuarter-hour neriods when station leads 



1 


WCSH-TV 


Station "B" 


Station "C" 


Mon. thru Fri. 
7.00 AM-12 Noon 


98 


(during 20 
n hrs. wkly. 
~ station 

on air) 


(Station not 
on air) 


Mon. thru Fri. 
12 Noon-6.00 PM 


67 


52 


(during 70 
~ hrs. wkly 
" station on 

air) 


Sun. thru Sat. 
6.00 PM-11 PM 


100 


37Vi* 


2Vi* 


('two-way ties count as one-half) 



HfSMty 




CHANNEL 6 



PORTLAND 

100,000 watts 

Represented bt WEED Television 



stations anti<i|>ate increases from 5 to 
20', in local business. The stations 
generally consider local advertising 
their bread and butter for daytime. 



Tv set count 



Q. What's being done to provide 
advertisers with an updated na- 
tional tv set "census"? 

A. Present figures showing the num- 
ber of tv sets and tv homes in the na- 
tion are. at best, projections based on 
estimates that are a couple of years old 
by this point. 

New figures, however, are on the 
way. 

The Advertising Research Founda 
tion has worked out an arrangemen 
with the U.S. Census officials to com 
pile facts on tv ownership as the Cen 
sus goes about its periodic task of up 
dating its "total U.S. families" fi w 
ures. The studies will be underwritten 
bv three of the leading tv networks — 
ABC. CBS and \BC — and the TvB 
and NARTB. 

This ARF-Census studv will show: 
the total number of U.S. homes 
equipped with tv, the percentage of 
multi-set tv homes, and the relation- 
ship of certain income and geographic 
factors to tv ownership. 



Q. What's being done to provide 
admen with market-by-market or 
county - by - county television set 
totals? 

A. The ARF-Census study men- 
tioned above wont provide local-level 
information: the sample is too small, 
researchers feel, to show figures for 
individual markets. The best the ARF- 
Census job will do in this respect is to 
show how tv sets are distributed by 
major geographic regions (East, Mid- 
west. Rockies. Pacific, etc.). 

The NARTB. however, has plans 
afoot to fill the local-level research 
gap. 

At the recent NARTB board meet- 
ing in Hot Springs. Clair McCollough. 
chairman of the associations tv board, 
placed a market-by-market set count 
at the top of the priority list of board 
activities. McCollough now hopes to 
see an NARTB set count go into the 
works for next spring. Just what 
method will be used to count the num- 
ber of tv sets in the thousands of U.S. 
counties is still not finalized by NAR- 
TB's research committee. 



58 



SPONSOR 



WTVW 



XEW XI ML VV \f W SAME FAME 



HILL BECOME 



WISN-TV 

MILWAUKEE 



WTVW, Hearst's top tower, top power station in 
Milwaukee, will shortly become WISN-TV, as 
authorized by the FCC. 

For 33 years \ learst-operated WISN radio has been 
recognized as a leader in the broadcast industry. 

Now WTVW joins its sister stations to provide 
advertisers with the best radio-tv combination in the 
great Milwaukee market. 

By any name, WISN-TV is Milwaukee's top television buy 



ABC & DuMONT NETWORKS 
top tower _ /o; • 

Owned and operated by the Hearst Corp. 
1105 ft. Edward Petry Co.-National Representatives 



CHANNEL 12 W |SJ\ ■ X V WlLWAUKEl 



11 JULY 1955 69 



S[M>t tV 



Q. Do tv broadcasters feel that 
an industry set count and/or cir- 
culation study is an important 
project? 

A. , k es indeed. A survey by SPON- 
SOR in June L955 of all U.S. tv sta- 
tions shows the following breakdown 
of replies: 44', consider such a proj- 
ect "urgent"; IV, consider it "im- 
portant"; and onl) W < consider it 
"unnecessary . 

Q. Would stations be willing to 
support such a project financially? 

A. Opinion gathered in the same 
checkup is more equally divided. Of 



the stations who cited answers on their 
questionnaires concerning station sup- 
port of a set-count and circulation 
>tud\. 3795 said "yes" they would sup- 
port it: 31$ said "no" they wouldn't; 
and the remaining 32^? said "maybe' 
the) would help paj for it. 

Outlook in general: Nearly 90% of 
stations feel that a set count and cir- 
culation checkup is a vital set of tv 
research data. But only about a third 
of the outlets are willing, at this point. 
to help defray the costs. As adver- 
tiser and agency pressure for such a 
study increases, however, this picture 
may change. 



BASIC TV MARKETS 

HUNTINGTON • ASHLAND • CHARLESTON 
IRONTON • PORTSMOUTH 



7t<MU. *f^€UAC 



tecv 



WHTN-TV 



HUNTINGTON, W. VA. 
BASIC ABC AFFILIATE 



eU**et13 



Not Claiming. . . 1st Audience Nor Admitting vrd listening 
Originally position 



1 



But for the . . . 1 st time WHTN, . . Brings a 



rd T.V. Service 



With RCA's 
Biggest , 



1 



st -Slotted 
(254) foot 
Antenna . . . 



AND 

Delivering 
Maximum . . 



116,000 Watts 
Power 



Newest 
program 
Service for 



1 



,3QfJ,000 Ohio Valley 

people in the Industrial 
Market Of 



States -West 
• Virginia 
Kentucky 
Ohio 



MAXIMUM POWER 
ABC-DuMont Id Petry Company 

70 



LOWEST RATES • DESIGNED COVERAGE 

5 W TVett* 



Color .status 

Q. What is the status of color 
tv set penetration? 
A. Industry estimates are that 150,- 
000 to 160,000 color tv sets will he 
produced thi> scar, and that well over 
one million sets will he in use hy the 
end of 1956. From then on, manufac- 
turers predict a rapid upsurge in pro- 
duction and a sharp decrease in prices. 
RCA's prices, for one, have already 
taken a downward dip since last year, 
from SI, 000 for a 15-inch set then to 
$795 and $895 for a 21-inch set now. 

Q. What is the status of color 
equipment at the tv stations? 

A. sponsor surveyed all the nation's 
tv stations to get the answer. Close to 
15' r of the stations, representing every 
l\ pe of market and area replied. 

Here's a breakdown on color equip- 
ment among the respondents: 

1. Network color: Right now 62' i 
of the stations are equipped to receive 
and transmit color shows, another 
IV, will he by the end of 1055. (>', 
more by 1956. 

2. Color slides: 17 f '( of the stations 
are equipped to handle color slides 
now; 11 % more will be able to by the 
end of the year and 21' '< by the end of 
1950. Most of them don't expect to 
make additional charges for color. 

3. Color film: Some 17' i of the tv 
stations replying are equipped today 
to handle color film, and another 10% 
expect to be able to by the end of this 
year. There'll be another 21% with 
color film projectors in 1956. Again, 
most of the stations don't expect to 
make additional charges, but some will 
ask for 10% more. 

4. Live local color shows: Only 
5', of the stations replying can orig- 
inate color shows today; another 2% 
will be able to by end of 1955: IV, 
more bv end of 1956. 



Film syndication 

Q. What's the status of the tv 
film program business today? 

A. Here are highlights which show 
where the film business (syndicated 
shows and features I stands now: 

1. Dollar volume: The conservative 
estimates of several leading film dis- 
tributors put the combined total of 
film program and feature gross busi- 
ness this year at the $60 million mark. 

2. Financial stability: The tv film 
field is a bonanza for some, a financial 

SPONSOR 





BUSINESS 
LOOKS 

GREAT 

FROM UP 
HERE! 



And it's no wonder! From 1685' above average terrain, Egbert, 
the Channel 8 Electron, gets a clear shot at THREE recognized metro- 
politan areas and their surrounding trade territories. So whaf So 
1685' will be the effective height of WFAA-TV's antenna when those 
steel jockeys complete their Texas-sized construction project. 

What does this mean to you? 

] # Inside the new Class "A" contour will be Dallas and Fort 
Worth — North Texas neighbors who account for more 
retail dollars than the nation's 1 2th ranking metropolitan 
area.* Add Waco's business (it's within Class "B" range) 
and that of the smaller communities in the WFAA-TV picture 
— and you have one of the most important markets in 
these United States! 

2. Already the tower is taller than any other structure in the 
state. By October, WFAA-TVs 316,000-watt signol will 
blanket this major concentration of population and wealth. 

To Egbert, the Channel 8 Electron, business looks great — for spon- 
sors who use WFAA-TV to cover this lush market in one easy operation. 



Dallas - Fort Worth — $1 ,643,940.000 
Minneapolis - St. Paul — $1,551,460,000 
Source: SM's Survey of Buying Power, 
May 10, 1955 




RALPH NIMMONS, Station Manager 

EDWARD PETRY & CO., Notionol Representative 

Television Service of The Dallas Morning News 



11 JULY 1955 



71 



Spot tv 



In-- in others. I he big firms w lio lia\ e 
survived tlie earliest, blue-sk) days 
now control the I i < " i > share of the 
business. Hut man) firms in i hi- field 

are hanging on l>\ I In- -kin of their 
teeth, or else are concentrating on 
some specialized field of programing 
i -pin i-. news, do-it-3 ourseH ) . 

'.. Program tinn share: \t the local 
level, film programs (syndicated series 
and feature pa< ' ages I account foj no 
less than 30' of all the program 
hours, network and local, telecast l>\ 
tin- average l\ outlet, according to the 
annual stud) b) N VRTB of t\ film 
programing (see "Film Basics." page 
133). 

4. Film pricing: With the market 
flooded with film properties, the price 
range of different film shows in the 
same market, or for the same film 
show in different markets, can he fan- 
tastic. \l the network level, a really 
good film show can command its pro- 
duction costs plus a profit to the pro- 
ducer I the half-hour average is around 
!>3.").()00l on the first run. In the larg- 
est markets, the price may run from 
$2,500 up to $5,000 weekly for the 
ton first-run film shows. Hut prices 
are often arrived at between distribu- 



tors and advertisers, or distributors 

and station-. Ii\ sheer bargaining and 

more often fall in the $250-8500 
categor) . 

Q. Are there any notable trends 
concerning time clearances for 
syndicated tv film shows? 

A. I he general situation regarding 
spot l\ availabilities has been dis- 
cussed earlier in this section (see page 
64.) Hut there are some other angles 
that appl) particularl) to tv film 
-how-: 

1. Scarcity oj nighttime slots: The 
networks are virtually sold out on most 
nights between 7:30 and 11:00 p.m.. 
Eastern time so there aren't many 
half-hour slots left on network affili- 
ates for syndicated film shows at the 
local level in the East, Rockies and 
Pacific areas. In addition, a number 
of network shows {Today. Tonight, 
Morning Show, etc. ) operate in mar- 
ginal time periods, cutting further 
into "film time." (See chart in '"Film 
Basics" section.) The late-night "film 
time" situation is somewhat heller in 
the Midwest, where network show line- 
ups generally finish off at 10:00 p.m., 



an hour earlier than the Eastern ones. 

Distributors, however, are fairly op- 
timistic about the chances of clearing 
good time slots for tv film programs 
this fall. There are several reasons for 
this optimism. For one thing, stations 
make more money ( up to 70 'r of the 
advertiser's dollar! from a multi-mar- 
ket spot film deal, as compared to the 
station's "take" from a network show 
130-40', of the card rate dollar I. 

For another, stations in large two- 
station markets still bargain freely 
with the network-, relinquishing a 
time clearance onl) if thev can get 
something in return. Occasionally this 
"'something" will be a station's refusal 
to carry a network show so that it can 
air a film show locally. Pure Oil, for 
instance, cleared a spot film lineup 
earlier this year in which all of the 
32 stations carrying its Badge 714 
I Dragnet rerun | scheduled it between 
7:00 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. in the peak 
\ iew ing hours. 

mum iiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iii;i> ii 

Film basics gives vital statistics 

of $60 million film industry 

See page 133. 



THE ANSWER IS ALWAYS THE SAME 



KSL-TV 

Salt Lake City 

The buy that's BEST 
in the Mountain 




CBS-TV in the Mountain West 



72 



SPONSOR 




The GREAT HOOSIER HEARTLAND 





Grade A Coverage 
Indianapolis • Terre Haute 

Grade B Pop. • 1,922,150 

(SRDS — Consumer Markets) 



PIONEERING 
SINCE 1949 



In INDIANAPOLIS • TERRE HAUTE • BLOOMINGTON 

Low Channel 4 — 1000 Ft. Tower — Maximum 100,000 Watts 
Offering Most Complete Merchandising Service in Indiana 



WTTV Channel ^f Owned and Operated by Sarkes Tarzian 



Represented Nationally by MEEKER TV, Inc. 
New York ■ Chicago ■ Los Angeles ■ San Francisco 



II JULY 1955 



73 



Spot tv 



2. Film "networks": The idea <>l 
offering film programs for sale with 
cleared-in-advance time slots lias long 
appealed to film distributors. Only 
one firm, so far, has been able to make 
it work: Guild Films, which has a tie- 
up with the 60 or so stations who 
?hare ownership <>l \ itapix Corp. 

Late last month, the Guild-\ itapix 
combine made its first "film network" 
sale. The show. Confidential File, will 
be aired this fall on the Vitapix mem- 
ber stations, and about 50 more non- 
affiliates. One of the alternate-week 
sponsors is Bardahl, long a big user 



nf spdi t\ campaigns for its motor 
additive. 

\- sponsor went to press, time clear- 
ances fur Confidential File were very 
good, thanks to the Vitapix contracts 
which call for some five hours weekly 
of "option time" on member stations. 
All time clearances for the half-hour 
show so far are between 7:00 and 
10:00 p.m. in such choice markets as 
Boston, Atlanta, Syracuse and Denver. 
Although the Guild-Vitapix arrange- 
ment is competitive with the major 
networks, it works closely with the sta- 
tion reps, who receive their usual 15 '/< 



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Population 

Sets In Use* 
Spendable Income) 
Retail Salest 



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86,500 

$562,596,000 

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1,178,450 

1 34,473 

$1,275,069,000 

$ 876,193,000 



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commission on multi-market Vitapix 
deals. Vitapix lakes 5' ', of the gross 
as a service charge. Stations wind up 
with at leas 65 '/( of the gross dollar. 

Another potential film network is 
currently in the works. National Affi- 
liated Television Stations, Inc. — a tie- 
up of film distributor National Tele- 
film Associates, General Electric and 
some 45 vhf and uhf outlets — has just 
opened a Los Angeles office, and is 
surveying available tv films. NATS 
states it expects to have some 75 "affili- 
ates" within a month or two. 

NATS has all the ingredients with 
which to build a film network a la 
Guild and Vitapix. NTA is a big film 
distributor I Police Call. China Smith. 
features, etc. I ; General Electric has a 
big stake in the future of uhf i 60' < 
of the NATS group are high channel 
stations) ; and many of the NATS 
stations have hankered after more na- 
tional business, either spot or network. 
One large contract would probablj 
start a "film network'' in a hurr\ . 

At the moment, however. NATS' 
executive director, Berman Swarttz is 
concentrating on surveying the prob- 
lems of member stations and checking 
on what type of film properties ( from 
NTA and elsewhere) w : ould be avail- 
able for multi-market deals. 



Q. What program trends are de- 
veloping in new first-run fall syn- 
dicated tv film shows? 

A. Although most syndicators and 
distributors will tell you privately that 
the huge supply of rerun shows from 
both network and syndication sources 
is making the job of selling new shows 
doubly difficult, about three out of 
four syndicators are launching brand- 
new shows this fall. 

In general, the level of production 
that distributors have been shooting 
for is that of top network calibre. 
"There's no such thing as 'network- 
type' and 'syndication-type' shows any 
more." said TPA v. p. Michael Siller- 
man. "With network programs going 
into syndicated reruns and shows from 
major film distributors winding up on 
the networks, there are onlv good, fair 
and bad film shows."" 

As to type, the great majority of 
new shows from film companies are 
in the "outdoor adventure"" category. 
or at least utilize ingredients of such 
programs. 

Here are some of the highlights: 

Screen Gems: A new SG western. 



74 



SPONSOR 




^ IN KTLA's SIGNAL AREA: 

POPULATION 7,004,800 • RETAIL SALES $8,244,000,000 • TV SETS 2,200,000 

P Represented Nationally by PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY 



7% of the nation's television homes can be reached by 



(Bo 



I 



11 JULY 1955 



75 



Spot fr 



Talcs of the Texas Rangers, will run 
in a network-level campaign for Gen- 
eral Mills. Also upcoming: Patti Page 
Show for Oldsinobile in a big multi- 
market lineup. 

Ziv: The next Ziv release, probably 
in straight non-network syndication, 
will be an action adventure series, 
Underground. 

TPA: Three new shows are in the 
works: Count of Monte Cristo, Thun- 
der ( adapted from "Black Beauty" and 
likely to be retitledl. and Tugboat 
Annie. 

MCA TV: Possibly with its eye on 



the current success of filmed medical 
(liamas, from Medic to Not As A 
Stranger, MCA will put Dr. Hudson's 
Secret Journal into syndicated sales 
this fall. 

NBC: With Western Marshal recent- 
ly released, NBC Film Division will 
soon be showing the prints of a film 
series based on Philip Wylie's Crunch 
and Des fishing stories. The series is 
being shot in Bermuda. 

Official: One of the first to see a 
tv film gold mine in adventure shows, 
Official has already sold Robin Hood 
to Wildroot and Johnson & Johnson for 




Auctioning the first baskets of tobacco at the opening of the annual 
tobacco market in Winston-Salem, N. C, the world's largest tobacco 
center ... in the heart of WSJS-TV coverage . . . where tobacco 
growing, marketing, and manufacturing contribute to the big buy- 
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WSJ Si TV 




WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

For North Carolina's 



GOLDEN TRIANGLE 

Plus Northwest North Carolina 



WINSTON-SAIEM 



CHANNEL 12 




"The Golden Triangle Station" 



GREENSBORO 

HIGH POINT — """1--*"' 

" Headley-Reed— Rep. 



networking in the TJ. S. and Canada, 
and has also lined up an English sale. 
Also in production: Scarlet Pimpernel 
and Sir Henry Morgan, both costumed 
adventure series. 

CBS: Upcoming fall deals include: 
Navy Log on the CBS TV web for 
Sheaffer Pen and Maytag; Long John 
Silver, shot in Australia; Straight Ar- 
row; Red Ryiler: Champion i Cene 
Autry's horse); Tales of the Foreign 
Legion, with Krrol Flynn. 

NT A: Fast-growing NTA will put 
its heaviest syndication push behind 
the internationally localed Police Call 
and New Adventures of China Smith. 

Guild Films: Three of Guild's new- 
est properties (one sold in the Vitapix 
tieup) are of an adventure nature: 
Confidential File, Brother Mark and 
/ Spy. The latter two will probably be 
in straight syndication. 

VM&M: This fall, the newest adven- 
ture property of UM&M, New Orleans 
Police Department, will be featured 
in the firm's sales activities. 

ABC: The network subsidiary ex- 
pects to close a major film sale for 
Sheena, Queen of the Jungle for a fall 
start. 

HTS: Hollywood Tv Service- — an 
offshoot of Republic Pictures — expects 
to have Dr. Fu Manchu and possibly 
one other series in syndication by the 
start of the fall season. 



Q. What program trends are de- 
veloping among rerun shows avail- 
able for syndication? 

A. The largest single trend in reruns 
concerns the type of shows that have 
been moving from network first runs 
into syndicated repeats. 

For the most part, these shows are 
situation comedies which have com- 
pleted a season on a major network. 
They include: 

My Little Margie and Trouble With 
Father, which are being syndicated by 
Official Films. Official, which recently- 
acquired rerun rights to Margie, has 
already sold close to $750,000 worth 
of contracts in major tv markets. 

Ray Milland, formerly on the air 
as Meet Mr. McNutley for General 
Electric, is going into syndicated re- 
run through MCA TV. Same firm 
handles Pride of the Family reruns. 

Life With Father is being handled 
i in the rerun field by CBS Film, now 



76 



SPONSOR 




FIREMAN FRANK 
is doing a great job on Saturday- 
Ask Free & Peters 
for details 



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A ravishing dame, even on TV, doesn't get a 
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thing is that she's in direct line of sight of 
1,382,000 families, who get shadow-free re- 
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of population . . .they can see Miss KRON-TV 
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. CHRONICLE A 

STJSrSik ■ «■* * 



Represented Nationally by Free & Peters, Inc. 
No. 4 in the series, "What Every Time Buyer Should Know About KRON-TV 



11 JULY 1955 



77 



Spot lv 



lining ii|> local it ii< I regional adver- 
tisers fin fall starts. 

Ra\ Bolger reruns, relatively fresh 
from last season's network runs, are 
being handled by ABC Film Syndica- 
i ion. 

The crop of situation comedies in 
syndicated rerun is growing each 
wick. More than a dozen film shows 
ol this type were axed recently at the 
network level by clients like Camp- 
bell's Soup and Chrysler. Most are 
now making the rounds of syndicators 
as their producers seek a rerun outlet. 



As far as straight syndicated shows 

are concerned, the onl\ real "trend" 
that s evident at the moment concerns 
the durabilit) of shows. 

Most indicators anticipated a first 
run. rerun and perhaps a subsequent 
run for the average show. A few 
shows follow this pattern, and then 
drop out of sight. 

But the constant!) growing tv audi- 
ence, coupled with the lower prices of 
rerun properties, has kept many a tv 
film series alive through run after run. 
Some, like Gene Autry, have gone 



MEMO: 

To Advertising Managers 
To Advertising Agencies 

We have PROGRAMS 
far your 
Giveaway PRIZES! 



Being a "Sponsor fan" you know 
ihe tremendous popularity of the 
quiz-giveaway type of program. 

All over the nation radio and TV 
stations need merchandise prizes 
for their own giveaway shows. 

Hundreds of stations depend 
upon Ray and Berger for these 
prizes. 

In the time it would take you 
to arrange participation on one 
of these stations, Ray and Berger 
can arrange participation for you 
on all their stations — nationally 
— or in selected marketing ter- 
ritories. 

Your only cost is your merchan- 
dise — no fees of any kind! — and 
you receive business-like agreed- 
upon commercial "plugs" that 
do credit to your company and 
your products. 

Add low-cost giveaway publicity 
to your advertising campaigns. 
("Sampling" and broadcast ad- 
vertising combined.) All the de- 
tails on request. 

Write, phone or wire collect. 

Hay and Berger 

(Established— 1949) 

1471 V Tamarind Avenue 

Hollywood 28, California 

HOIIvwood 24202 

DOVT BE FOOLED! Thi. i< the 

tame Raj ami Berber mentioned in tlit* 

column In til*- right ' 



MEMO: 

To Radio Stations and 
To Television Stations 

We have PRIZES 

for your 

Giveaway PROGRAMS 



Ever since the apple episode in 
the Garden of Eden people have 
enjoyed winning prizes! 

A rollicking giveaway show is 

easy to produce — the cost is 

small — and the popularity is 
great. 

We subscribe to Mae West's phi- 
losophy. You can create more in- 
terest with a thousand $1 prizes 
than you can with one $1000 
prize. 

The reason is simple: You have 
one thousand happy winners in- 
stead of one! 

Our prizes range from $1 up to 
$350. They are supplied by the 
finest, most discerning manufac- 
turers in the U. S. (Top names). 

And our fee for regular monthly 
service is less than it would cost 
you to do it yourself — time and 
salaries considered. 

Want complete information? 

Reach for the phone and call us 
or grab your secretary and start 
dictating! 

We'll answer you fully in almost 
no time at all. 

Hay anh Berger 

(Established— 1949) 

1471 N. Tamarind Avenue 
Hollywood 28. California 

IIOIKv. I 38648 



\\ \TCI1 YOl'R STEP! ti. 



ese are 



i he same t** o fellows 

column at the left! 



mentioned in the 



78 



around as often as 17 limes in one 
market. Some feature film packages, 
like TPA's group of Edward Small 
productions, have played as often as 
2(> times in the same market. 

Result: Syndicators expect the most 
competitive fall season to date as re- 
nins battle with new shows for the tv 
advertising dollar. 



Q. What is being done to de- 
velop new sales outlets for syndi- 
cated tv film programs? 

A. Syndicators and producers are 
moving in strong!) on two important 
targets: 

1. Network sales: Through experi- 
ence, the top film distributors have 
learned that taking a financial loss on 
the first run and hoping to make up 
a profit in rerun sales can be a risky 
business indeed. Therefore, virtually 
all of the big tv film program firms 
try first today for a network tv sale be- 
fore they eye the s\ ndication market. 

Many are succeeding. Screen Gems, 
this fall, will have six shows on the 
networks (Ford Theatre, Father Knows 
Best, Rin Tin Tin. Captain Midnight, 
Damon Runyon, Tales of the Texas 
Rangers ) . TPA will have four I Halls 
of Ivy. Captain Gallant. Lassie, Thun- 
der I. Official Films will have two 
i Robin Hood. Four Star Playhouse \ ; 
so will CBS TV Film Sales i Straight 
Arrow. Navy Log\. Guild Films will 
have its Confidential File on a network- 
like deal through its Vitapix tieup. 
ABC Film Syndication is discussing a 
network sale of its recentlv acquired 
series, Sheena, and has opened a Na- 
tional Sales Dept. 

Meanwhile, a number of svndica- 
tors, notably MCA TV and ABC Film 
Syndication, have been boosting their 
warm-weather sales by selling film 
shows I some new, some rerun I to net- 
work sponsors like Kodak. Campbell 
Soup, American Tobacco and Maytag 
as network summer replacements. 

2. Foreign sales: X\ ith network time 
at a premium, syndicators are turning 
to foreign markets as well. NBC Film 
Division is currently discussing the 
sale of film shows to the commercial 
tv firms in England, as are Official. 
NTA. Ziv. CBS TV, and TPA. One 
bitch so far: nobod) knows exact]} 
bow many of Britain"? several million 
tv sets have been converted to receive 
the commercial channels. Therefore, 
il"s \er\ difficult, syndicators report, 
to establish a British tv film pricing 

SPONSOR 



portrait of a market . • . 








11 JULY 1955 



79 




notker winner/ 



from the portfolio of. 



TPA 



Sales Builders 



No mystery about the success of this one. Here's a brand 
new series, that boasts an unbroken record of success in 
every major medium. Ellery Queen is a fictional detective 
who is very real to tens of millions of fans. And Hugh 
Marlowe, star of stage ("Voice of the Turtle") and screen 
("Twelve O'Clock High" and many others) brings him to 
vivid life in each episode. 



With scripts (which avoid sadism and brutality) super- 
vised by Ellery Queen, with production on the level of the 
highest quality dramatic offerings, the show has won 
instantaneous acceptance by local and regional advertisers 
throughout the country, as well as by stations which 
bought the property to make sure it was on their air. All 
of them are profiting from the audience-building tie-in 
with the American Weekly. 

If you're interested in a series where you know how you're 
going to come out, Ellery Queen is your dish. 

For availabilities on this proved winner, contact your 
nearest TPA office. 



Television Programs of America, Inc. 

New York: t7? Madison Avenut 
Chicago: 203 N. Wabash Ar, me 
Hollywood: 5746 Sunset Boulevard 



structure. I lii> situation, however, will 
probably clear bj fall. 

Foreign-language markets — Cuba. 
Smith America. Mexico and parts of 
Kurope — are still relativel) a drop in 
h films' financial bucket. Hut they are 
becoming more and more important 
as a source of additional syndicated 
revenue. Leader in this field of "dub- 
bin" American tv films for foreign 
scanning is Ziv, which has most of its 
present tv series available in Spanish, 
and man) in French, German, and 
Italian. MCA TV is also becoming very 
active in this field. Screen Gems re- 
cently opened a European office, and 
also has its eye on foreign markets. 

One of the best of the "foreign" 
markets is right next door to the U. S. 
— Canada. There, with tv booming, 
indicators have been active in net- 
work-level sales, multi-market film 
deals, and single-station sales. 



Film commercials 

Q. What's the cost range for 
film commercials? 

A. It s difficult to pin down costs bv 
length of commercials. Most produc- 
ers sell clients packages, consisting of 
a certain number of minutes, some 
20"s. perhaps I.D."s. Costs, of course, 
depend upon the number of actors 
used, the sets, production techniques, 
degree of animation, and so forth. 
However, it is possible to establish cer- 
tain minimums and maximums. 

A live-action I.D., for example, 
might cost anywhere from $300 to 
$1,000, although several producers 
mentioned minimums under $200. 
Animated I.D.'s pretty well have to 
cost over $500, and might go as high 
as $2,000, although that's above aver- 
age. Live-action minute films can be 
made for as little as $750, but gen- 
erally the cost is in the thousands. Ani- 
mated minute commercials range from 
S1.500 to $10,000. with S5.000 being 
a fair average for full animation. 
Twenty-second commercials of the 
same type as the minute commercials 
cited above are generally some 40% 
cheaper than one-minutes. 



Q. How have union requirements 
affected film commercial costs 
this year? 

A. Very little indeed. Although the 



S/..W /. 



S \(i contract, [oi one, wm rene 
ated in en U spi ing <>l this year, the 
basic principal >>\ reuse payments ."i 
acton remained unchanged, and ili«" 
minimum scale v\ .1- raised less than 5. ! . 

Mam small iun.lii.i-i~. particularly 
those h iili -m.ill.i .1 -n. ■>■- ml adver- 
Users as clients, have had t>> raise 
prices of their animated film commer- 
cials in order to cover their overhead 
and compensate for the loss of l>u»i- 
ness resulting from the SAG contract. 
"Those nt "in clients who're on verj 
bight budgets have turned to Blides, 
-till photos or Live commercials when 
possible,' 1 the head oi one film produc- 
tion house told sponsor. 

Propert) men. I \TSK local ")2. ne- 
gotiated f<»r a new contract late in 
1954 and got increases <>f approxi- 
mate!) S5 weekl) in each category. 

However, the producers themselves 
were able to absorh those costs, Uso 
through IATSE, film cameramen have 
gotten up to a 509! increase in |>a\. 
That has not affected over-all costs since 
most producers pas way above scale be- 
• BUM of the demand. Compared with 
1950, cameramen are gettinu about 
100'; more: $65 a da\ five \ear~ ago, 
from $100 to Sl.iO a da\ in lO-Vx 



Color commercials 

Q. What percent of commercials 
is being shot in color now? 
A. Between 1 5 and tj indui 

tr\ soun es. Propoi tionatel) . I 
are somew hat more commen ials 1 • 

done in I "lor than then- are ■ "l"i 
-how-. he. BUSe maii\ I lient- and 

i gencies feel thai the) i an amortize 

the cost of the commen ial b) ha\ ing 
black-and-white print- struck from the 
negative f<>t cm rent use, .ni<l \>\ hav- 
ing the i "li>r film read) as soon a- 

the time is ri|ie. 

I he days of franti. experimentation 

II color -eelll tO he "\ei. ( lirnl- .m- 

no longer rushing into it merel) out "! 
tear oi being left behind. Few majoi 
t\ advertisers can sa) thai dies haven't 
experimented with package color, and 
various camera and production coloi 
techniques. II they're shooting their 
commercials in color today, it- be- 
cause the) feel that they'll need a 
color commercial within the next two 
years, and they find it economical 
to strike a b&w print and be prepared. 



TOP CONVERSION 
98% home (Sanga- 
mon) county 
(ARB, Mar. 19SS) 
87.1 % average other 
primary counties 
(Videodex, 
Jan. 1955) 



SALES RESULTS 

New and used car deal- 
er. Sat. niVe feature film 
— cost $450.00. RE- 
SULTS by 1:00 P.M. 
next day: TEN new cart 
told (value $20,000). 
NINETEEN ether quali- 
fied prospects, THREE 
HUNDRED people in lot. 



PROVEN AUDIENCE 
All top 15 once-a- 
week shows 
All top 10 multi- 
weekly shows 
(Pulse, Nov. 1954) 



BEST PICTURE 
Crystal clear 

Consistently stable 
Ideal terrain for 
perfect reception 



WICS 



CHANNEL 20 



LOCAL LOYALTY 
First station to serve 
the entire State Cap- 
ital Market with top 
network, film, and 
local public service 
programs. 



SERVING ILLINOIS' 

STATE CAPITAL 

MARKET 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



20 COUNTIES" 22.260 FARM FAMILIES 

510,578 POPULATION $785,390,300 EB I 
165.241 FAMILIES $595,717,000 ANNUAL RETAIL SALES 

Source: SM. Survey of Buying Power. May 1954 



^Is 



O.M0NT 



PRIMARY 




Ask your Adam Young rep 
tor complete detail* and 
new market brochure on 
this outstanding State Cap- 
ital Market SOLD only thru 
WICS. 



U P 1953 
U ■ 1954 



UP 



1955 



1 1ST 

MORE 
VIEWERS 



UIVEC-TV 

* 220,000 watts 
500 foot tower 



Serving NORFOLK, 
Hampton, Newport News, 
Portsmouth, Warwick, 
Virginia Beach 



Source: Telepulse May 1954 
May 1955 



Ifi 



banc affiliate 



represented by AVERY - KNODEL 



11 JULY 1955 



81 



Spot tv 



Film commercial tips 

Q. What tips can producers give 
to the advertisers and agencies in 
order to improve their film com- 
mercials? 

A. Producers generally agree that 
the agency-producer relationship has 
improved particularly over the past 
two years because the agencies have 
become more experienced in film work 
and the producers more knowledge- 
able about advertising problems and 
tv. However, here are some of the 
areas where improvement could still 
be forthcoming: 

1. Be better prepared before pro- 
duction starts. You don't save time by 
going to work on a half-finished or not 
yet approved script. Agencies would 
do well to consul* the producer be- 
fore submitting the final storyboard to 
the client, because the producer may 
be able to suggest a cost-cutting or 
particularly effective technique that 
the writer couldn't envision. 

2. Discuss your budget frankly 
with the producer. He'll help you 
match storyboard to cost. It's better 
to do an unpretentious job well, rather 



than ask for fancy settings and skimp 
on actors. 

3. Keep your commercial simple 
and free of tricks. No one's suggest- 
ing a monotonous sales pitch, but too 
often special effects such as an exces- 
sive number of opticals or camera 
tricks will detract from the product 
\ou*re trying to sell. You don't have 
to be arty to be original. 

4. Give the producer enough time. 
True, you may have gotten a commer- 
cial for one of your products within 
three weeks, and now the producer's 
asking for 10 weeks. But certain jobs 
require more work. Animation, for 
example, requires more man-hours 
than any other type of commercial. 
Stop-motion is time consuming. 

5. Take advantage of the screen 
writer's services on producers' staffs to 
improve the visual conception. 

6. Accept the recommendations of 
experienced film-makers regarding the 
use of optical effects and composition. 

7. When the product is of a type 
that can be demonstrated, take advan- 
tage of tv's ability to dramatize the 
demonstration. 

8. Let the video tell the story. Use 
copy to augment what can't be told in 



pictures, but remember that too much 
talk can kill your commercial. 

9. Keep the setting authentic and 
believable. 

10. Dont put too many elements in 
one commercial. 1 ry to decide on a 
central theme and develop it. A min- 
ute or less is too short a time to tell 
more than one story. 

11. Encourage more frequent con- 
sultation with producers for agency 
personnel. Agencymen, necessarily, 
have less technical knowledge about 
film commercial production since 
they're not involved in it day-in and 
day-out. Have them consult the pro- 
ducer during the planning stages to 
avoid making commercials too expen- 
sive, too complex or impossible to 
produce within your time limits. 



Film commercial trends 

Q. What are the outstanding 
trends in film commercial produc- 
tion in 1955? 

A. This is the year of economy, or 
at any rate, costs are a bigger factor 
today than they have been since tele- 







SAN ANGELO — TEXAS 



* One Station Market 

* Unduplicated Coverage 

* Top Promotions 



Marks the Spot! 

DOES A BIG SELLING JOB! 



In the GREAT San Angelo trade area these are facts: 

Families 76,800 

Average Buying Income $5,052.00 

Retail Sales $295,970,000.00 

Total Buying Income $387,993,600.00 

It's BIGGER than ever before!* 



PLUS THIS 



NOW WITH 41,243 SETS * (and growing too) 



KTXL-TV 



SAN ANGELO, TEXAS 

with over 2 years of service to RICH 
WEST TEXAS! 

•Pacts and figures officially based on compila- 
tion of material from, Sales Management Mag- 
UKTMA Monthly Report, Community 
Towei s rvice, Public Utilities Report, County 
Agents Weekly Mail Report, Slate Reference 
Material (1954 55 Issue), and Regional Market 
Survej through May 1955. 



Interconnected 
with 




PROGRAMS FROM 
NBC-ABC 
DU MONT 



things look 
good on channel 



j. H. Hubbard 
General Manager 

Representatives: 

Venard, Rintoul & McConnel 
New York 

Clyde Melville Co., Dallas 



82 



SPONSOR 



V' '■ 



vision was horn. More lilin commer- 
cials t hit ti evei sxe being prodw ed, 
bul agencies and clients axe keeping a 
closer eye on the bill*. Storyboarda 
seem to be written with . ii~t> a prime 
motivation. Simpler techniques are 
being used, and few producers g<> 
n\ ei board <>n fancj opt* ala. 

"Film commercials have grown op, 
~a\ moat prodw ei a. 

The atoryboarda generall) call for 
softer sell, more emphasis <>n low-pros- 
-iii«'. entertaining and sometimes even 
subtle pit< lies. They're more straight- 
forward in technique, Bince agenc) 
copywriters are do longer as impressed 

with the fancy tricks the eamera can 
play. 

There's something of a move back 

to live-action film commercials this 
\ear. compared with 1953 and 1934. 
Originally, when the SAG contract put 
reuse payments for actors into effect, 
clients rushed into animated commer- 
cials. Today there are still far more 
animated, partially animated and pup- 
pet-type commercials than two years 
BgO. But the growth of animated com- 
mercials has slowed down. 

"Heal people sell more," as the copy 
chief of one of the top radio-tv agen- 
cies put it. "Animation is wonderful 
for some products. Its attention-get- 
ting and entertaining. But you can't 
identify with cartoon figures as you 
do with real people."' 

Live talent, however, is being used 
somewhat differently in many commer- 
cials this year. For one thing, there 
are more straight forward demonstra- 
tions and fewer testimonials than in 
previous years. Just because someone 
is a personality doesn't mean that he 
or she will be starred in a commer- 
cial in l ( ).ii. Today, agencies are look- 
ing for some logical tie-in between 
the product and the personality. 

\lso, there's more voice-over than 
ever before. 



st in Power 
and Coverage 

1,000,000 

WATTS 




Wilkes-Barre 
Scranton 

Call Avery-Knodel, Inc. 




TV time buyers like you prefer WBEN-TV because of the 
production quality they've learned to expect from this 
pioneer station. On the air since 1948, WBEN-TV is — 
by far — Buffalo's oldest TV outlet. This means seven 
long years of experience in giving commercials meticulous 
handling by a crew of production experts who have been 
with WBEN-TV since it's beginning. 

These skilled crews take each commercial smoothly over 
the rough spots — from sound to lighting, from camera 
to CONSTANT control room shading. The result is a 
quality treatment that only experienced conscientious — 
specialists can produce. 

So when you buy TV time in Buffalo, buy Ql ALITY ! 
Buy WBEN-TV ! . 



& 



x* 



o* v 



.\M 






i& CBS NETWORK 

WBEN-TV 



«.. 




BUFFALO, N. Y. 



WBIN-TV Representative 



Harrington, (lighter and Parsons. Inc.. New York. Chicago, San Francisco 



11 JULY 1955 



83 




y 



er winner; 



/ 



from the portfolio of i 



TPA 



Sales Builders 



Here's a series that offers local and regional advertisers 
52 different, top quality, network calibre programs with 
a proved, impressive audience record. In every type of 
market . . . against every type of competition, it comes 
up with solid, pay-off ratings. 

Your* Star Showcase is a lavish, star-studded produc- 
tion. It's a weekly parade of such audience-pulling names 
as Celeste Holm, Broderick Crawford, Ruth Hussey, Pres- 
ton Foster, Peter Lawford, Laraine Day, MacDonald Carey, 
Diana Lynn and Jack Carson, etc., etc., etc. 

Right now, this TPA show is doing a great job for adver- 
tisers throughout the country selling everything from 
automobiles to ready-to-wear. 

For availabilities on this proved winner, contact your 
nearest TPA office. . 

'Advertiser or brand name 



Television Programs of America, Inc. 

New York: 177 Madison An nue 
Chicago: 203 N. Wabash Av< nui 
Hollywood: 5746 Sunset Boulevard 



Farm tv 

Q. How big is the farm tv mar- 
ket? 

A. Rural areas (counties with less 
than 100,000 population) account for 
most of the tv set penetration growth 
in the U.S. the past year. This is due 
in large part to the launching of oper- 
ations by tv stations in rural areas 
which have not had tv before — each 
new station creating thousands of 
new tv homes. Where a year ago 
(June 1954) tv set saturation in farm 
homes was 41.29? > according to a Dan- 
iel Starch study for NBC Research 
Department, the current estimate is 
that about 50% of farm households 
are now tv-equipped — and the number 
is growing fast. I National tv set pen- 
etration is estimated at about 72' ! . I 
That tv stations consider the farm 
audience an important one is evi- 
denced by the fact that 56% of the 
respondents to sponsor's 1955 Buyers' 
Guide to Station Programing reported 
regularly scheduled farm programing 
— devoting from a quarter-hour to five 
hours a week to market news, weather 
and crop reports, other farm-interest 
features. Of the 205 stations airing 
farm programs, 24 have farm directors 
who are members of the NARFTD. 

Farmers furnish a healthy, nicely- 
heeled market for tv advertisers of all 
kinds of products — largely, of course, 
feeds, implements, seeds, other agricul- 
tural necessities. Their farms are big- 
ger than ever (because they are fewer! 
and their standard of living, which 
rose 54% in the decade between 1940 
and 1950. is still rising. 



Top clients 

Q. Who are spot tv's biggest cli- 
ents? 

A. Rorabaugh Report on Spot Tv 
Advertising lists the biggest spot tv 
clients by the number of schedule? 
and stations they buy. The list does 
not necessarily rank clients in order of 
dollar spending. It's possible for one 
company to use fewer stations than an- 
other, but to be a bigger spender, 
since frequency is not reflected. 

Here then is N. C. Rorabaugh's list 
of the 25 biggest spot tv clients during 
the first quarter of 1955: 1. Procter & 
Gamble; 2. Brown & Williamson; 3. 
Sterling Drug; 4. Standard Brands: 
5. Block Drug; 6. Colgate-Palmolive: 

SPONSOR 



S//..I II 



In Green Bay 
Packerlana 



YOUR 
D011AR 

BUYS MORI 
ON 11 

f$ More Viewers Per Dollar 
Over li>' ( more unduplicated 
t\ homes per dollar in primary 
coverage area. 



S 



8 



The idea] complement to your 

Milwaukee-Chicago TV cov- 
erage. 

More Merchandising 
Follow-Through 

Dealers s t o c k up when 
VVMBVs merchandising gives 
advance notice of up-coming 
campaigns on Channel 11. 

WMBV makes your TV dol- 
lar move more merchandise 
all the way along the line. 

More Program Power 
Unusually high percentage of 
top NBC show- gives you 
well-rated adjacencies. 

Studios in both Green Bay and 
Marinette are finest in Packer- 
land, make possible unprece- 
dented live shows of regional 
interest. 



Phone VENARD. RINTOUL & McCONNELL 

New York, Chicago. Lcs Angeles. 

San Francisco 

WMBV-TV 



ill n AFFILIATE 




Studios in 

Green Bay & Marinette 

Wisconsin 



Ratnei Promotions; 8. ' artei Prod- 

in t-; 9. < .in.i.il I I- : 10. National 

Bi« mi; 1 1. Bulova wVrtch; 12. Mile* 
I aba ; 1 3. < !ai nation : 14. Grove Labs; 
15. \nahist ; l<>. \ u k < hemu al; I 7. 
I!. .1. Re) nolds; 18. < hesebrou] h; 19. 
I ord; 20. P. Lorillardj 21. General 
Mills; 22. Petei Paul; 23 Kello 
24. foni; 25 < leneral Motors. 



Tv Iioiim'iii.tK in- shows 

Q. How many tv stations have 
local homemaking shows? 
A. Homemaking programs on h an 
practical!} universal. They're offered 
1>\ 96| < ot the iv stations reporting to 
sponsor's L955 Hm <■/■,' Guide to Sta- 
tion Programing. This type of pro 
graming falls into srx main categories 
kitchen, home de< oration, child care, 
do-it-yourself, fashion and beauty. 

Kitchen shows, the traditional t\| 

women's programing, -till retain theii 
popularity; they're carried b) 'Hi' > oi 

the stations. Home decoration and 
fashion come next- 7U' , of the sta- 
tions schedule such show-. Beaut) care 
and do-it-yourself topics follow, with 
55 and 7rV '< frequency respectively. 
Child care programs or portions of 
programs were reported 1>\ 27', of 
the station-. 



Studio facilities 

Q. What are television stations 
equipped to do for advertisers in 
the way of live commercials? 

A. I ou'll find toda\ that most tele- 
vision stations have the makings of 
effective live commercials. 

Basic, of course, is the living room 
set as a backdrop for the look'em-in- 
the-eye home) commercial. Buyers' 

(ri/idr shows f )~' < of stations re-pond- 
ing have permanent living room sets. 

\\ hen it comes to more informal 
surroundings, 7V , of stations report- 
ing had permanent outdoor or patio 
sets. 

The advertiser who wants an auto- 
mobile used as a "prop" can ask 
01 ' , of stations to drive one right into 
the studio via a convenient ramp. 

Some 47' < of reporting station- 
have rear-screen projection equipment 
available for the adman who wants 
the local personality to be poised in 
front of rolling wave- or other effects. 

* * * 



U P 1953 

UP 



1954 



UP 



1955 




MORE 
VIEWERS 



UIVEC-TV 

^ 220,000 watts 
500 foot tower 



Serving NORFOLK, 
Hampton, Newporl News, 
Portsmouth, Warwick, 
Virginia Beach 



• Source: Telepulse May 1954 
May 1955 






B 

-iX • 



basic affiliate 



represented by AVERY -KNODEL 



11 JULY 1955 



85 




NETWORK TV 



• Single-show sponsorships are a declining hreed, may soon he confined 
to handful of blue-chip corporations. Alternate-week sponsors increasing 

• Soap operas will become less important and, while they won't die out, 
won't be as important to network tv as they were in network radio's heyday 

• With Du Mont out of simultaneous networking picture, ABC will be 
strengthened and network battle will become a more even three-way affair 
Full competition awaits substantial uhf-vhf re-allocation program by FCC 

• Trend to film, slowed down temporarily by spectaculars and hour dra- 
mas, will be given fillip by growing importance of movie-produced shows 

• Network costs will continue to rise as set saturation, competition 
for stars grows but costs-per-1,000 will compare well with other media 



Programing 

Q. What are the network tv pro- 
graming trends for the fall? 

A. There are five distinct program- 
ing developments, four of them at 
night. Two of the nighttime trends are 
accelerated from last season, two are 
completely new. Here's the over-all 
picture: 

1. A decline in the situation comedy. 
The voracious demands of tv seem 
to have drained dry the creative 
abilities of situation comedy writers. 
As a result, these shows died like flies 
last season. The extent to which this 
happened can be seen by perusing a 
list of situation comedies on last 
October and checking off those which 
will not be back next season. The 
casualties totaled 16, eight of them 
on CBS TV. Of the 35 or so new shows 
on next season, only three situation 
comedies are set so far, with a fourth 
a definite possibility. 

2. A rise in the outdoor adventure 
format. So far eight of the new shows 
scheduled for next season fall in this 
category. Four of them are on CBS TV 



during the 7:30-8:00 p.m. weekday 
slots and spearhead the web's efforts 
to capture the kid-plus-adult audiences 
that ABC TV has been successfully 
coralling in that time period with 
Disneyland, The Lone Ranger and Rin 
Tin Tin. 

3. The long, non-weekly show, ex- 
emplified by NBC's spectaculars, got 
its start last season but this kind of 
programing will pull network tv up to 
new heights of excitement next season. 
The networks seem driven by a let's- 
get-top-stars-money-is-no-object policy 
and appear to be looking over their 
shoulders at the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission and what the Com- 
mission might do in regard to fee tv. 
While the spectaculars were not origi- 
nally brought in to head off fee tv, 
there is a growing feeling, outside the 
networks, at least, that top showman- 
ship by the networks could cut the 
ground from under box-office video. 

4. Hollywood-video tieups are in- 
creasing. This, too, is a continuation 
of a trend. It was kicked off with a 
bang last season by ABC TV with 
Disneyland, although there had been 
various indirect movie-tv links going 



back before last year, such as the 
movie promotion found in Toast of 
the Town and the production of tv 
films by Columbia Pictures' subsidiary, 
Screen Gems. In addition to the two 
studios mentioned, others now in tv 
include Warner Bros., Paramount, 
MGM, Twentieth-Century Fox, Univer- 
sal-International. 

5. Possible decline of the soap opera 
is the outstanding programing develop- 
ment on daytime network tv. This is 
most noticeable on NBC TV, but CBS 
TV has been affected, too, by the grow- 
ing question of whether the daytime 
serial has a long-term future on tv. 
NBC TV starts next season with onlv 
one serial, First Love. Recently- 
dropped were Greatest Gift and Con- 
cerning Miss Marlowe and it looks like 
Haivkins Falls is headed the same way. 
NBC TV expects to have Way of the 
World and Modern Romances on next 
fall but these are self-contained dramas, 
not serials in the classic sense. CBS TV 
goes into the fall with a strong block 
of four soapers in the noon-to-l:00 
p.m. slot and two more late in the 
afternoon but The Inner Flame and 
Road of Life have already been can- 



86 



SPONSOR 



celled. So far as can he learned, there 
are no new daytime drUDU 01 an) 
kind being planned by any of the 
networks. 

i For details <>n the fall tv lineup, 

see (hart in thi> i->ii<- on page 90 | » 1 1 1 — 
Btoriea in 13 and 27 June issues oi 
SPONSOR.) 



Q. What arc the implications of 
the growing romance between 
Hollywood and television? 
A. ftfosl important is 1 1 1 « - availabil- 
ity of a great program source for tv. 
If the movie studios continue turning 
out shows that pet ratings like Disney- 
land there is little question hut that 
movies and movie-produced shows will 
continue to multipl) on tv. \\ hat this 
might mean in terms of program con- 
trol vis-a-vis the networks onlj time 
will tell. 

Also important is the fact that ABC 
TV is in the vanguard of the trend 
and, in a limited way, is fighting its 
ua\ to equality with CBS TV and 
NBC TV by way of Hollywood. The « 
web has signed with three studios — 
Disney, Warner Bros, and MGM — in 
addition to planning a 90-minute fea- 
ture film show every Sunday. 

Of particular interest is the fact that 
the three studios which signed with 
ABC did so with one eye on their 
prime customers — movie exhibitors. 
All three shows involve promotion of 
motion pictures which will not be 
shown on tv and which, therefore, are 
in competition with tv. 

To what extent this will hurt the net- 
works through possible loss of audi- 
ence, as well as paid movie advertis- 
ing, is a question that has been raised. 
ABC feels that "behind-the-scenes"' 
promotion and movie trailers have a 
positive interest to tv viewers. And 
many broadcasters feel that the excite- 
ment of movie programing and stars 
more than compensates for the audi- 
ence that may be lost through motion 
picture promotion on the networks. 



Increase in outdoor adventure shows (there 
are eight new ones this fall) is typified 
bj ABC's "Wyatt Earp" new cowboy series. 

P&G policy of buying circulation through 
part purchases of shows like CBS' "Line- 
up" is tipoff to scattered shots trend. 

Du Mont's pro football offering is excep- 
tion to web policy of turning itself into 
film network via film and live Electronieam. 

NBC's Ted Mack show illustrates web's 
interest in daytime personalities rather than 
daytime serials as means of building daytime. 



11 JULY 1955 




&JK 












v--- 



CIRCUIT 

a public preview qj N/Jr Television, 1955-56 

by Sylvester /.. '/ eaver, Jr.. President, and Robert H . Safnoff, Executive Vice President 



In August of last year, an advertisement to tin - trade proi laimed: 
"NBC open- the \car <'f exoitemenl on television!" 

The season is passing and main who were honest]) skeptical 
have admitted that the veai's pel formance i- measuring u)> to 
the prophecy. 

It has been the year of 90-minute Color Spectaculars, of Gobel 
and Medie and Caesar's Hour, of Today-Home-Tonight, of un- 
precedented special programs like "Peter Pan." But such an enu- 
meration, as proudly as we make it. is only a small part of the 
story. This was the season when television programming shed the 
shackles of tradition: ceased to he the child of radio and became 
a medium of its own — the greatest medium of entertainment and 
enlightenment that the world has ever seen. 

The growth of the medium was a tribute to the entire in- 
dustrv. At NBC we are proud that we took a bold and adventurous 
course, and we will quicken the pace in the year to come. Here is 
a portion of what you may expect: 

color spread— The success of this season's Color Spec- 
taculars is now history. But next season NBC Spectaculars will 
move still farther forward. Appropriated, the first show in the new 
"Color Spread" Spectacular series will be a special 2-hour tele- 
cast of Thornton Wilder's theatrical masterpiece "Skin of Our 
Teeth"— starring Mary Martin and Helen Hayes. "Color Spread" 
will also open up an affordable new selling opportunity of major 
importance for most advertisers. 

one-time "specials" — Already scheduled are a repeat 
of "Peter Pan." and a musical version of the Pulitzer Prize play 
"Our Town" featuring Frank Sinatra. In addition, NBC will 
pioneer in a new direction. First-run full-length A-films will be 
seen for the first time anywhere, on NBC Television. The fir-t of 
these film features will be Alexander Korda's color production of 
"The Constant Husband" starring Rex Harrison. 
MAURICE EVANS PRESENTS — the finest theatre of all 
time, presented Sunday afternoons by the distinguished producer- 
director-actor. Included in Mr. Evans' schedule of hour-and-a-half 
color programs will be several Shakespearean productions in 
which he himself will star. 

sports — NBC will continue to be the leading sports network, 
with a year-round calendar of key events in every area of sports, 
including the full schedule of NCAA football. 
original drama and musicals — Included in the 
Producers" Showcase schedule of 90-minute plays will be original 
works bv outstanding contemporary playwrights. These dramas 
will be mounted with all the expertness that marked Producers' 



Showcase this season. Robert Montgomery Presents, The K 

I lir.it re. I In- Philco-Good) eai Television Play house w ill < ontinue 
to present weekly full-houi dramatic productions, ami will be 
joined tin- \.;n by tin- new 60-minute Pontiae-Armstrong Theatre 
-' beduled on Tuesday nights, 

variety - Berle, Raye and Hope will appear in the Tuesday 
nighl hour that ha- I i television tradition. In addition, 

Perry Como will be star ami host "f a big new Saturday night 
hour of unmatched variety entertainment Tin- Colgate Houi on 
Sunday will be decked out in fresh, resplendent entertainment 
dress. And NBC will -how. ase it- newest i andidates f"r Gohel-type 
laurels a- "tin- most exciting discovery of tin- war." Keep your 
eye on personalities like Jonathan \\ inters and >uc Carson! 
special program events - Throughout the year 
\I'>C. will use prime time periods to present special television 
event-, such as "1976, Your World of Tomorrow* 1 on October 9th; 
"Nightmare in Red." an hour-long history in film <>f Russian 
communism from 1905 to the death of Stalin, featuring 

deal of sec ret footage seen now for tin- first tunc: "Tin- Ja// \ 

a highlight report of America's boisterous, "bubble" years; and 

'" i oung India." a probing film commentary on tin- i pic and the 

problems of a country vitally important to Vmericans. 

This is a sketch in brief of some of the things next season 
holds for NBC's audiences and advertisers. It i- our goal to presi nt 
whatever the vast and variegated Ameri< an publii enjoys, v. 
hopes for and should have from telet ision. Vnd for sponsors NBC 
will continue to devise flexible l>u\ing patterns which inak< I\ 

available to advertising budgets ol every size. 

This year our slogan has been "Exciting Things ar<- Ha] 
ins on NBC Television." It holds good for 1955-1956 . . . 



P~ . /TT^^C^^J 



exciting tilings arc happening on 




TELEVISION 



a service of 



Network tv 



Q. Will the total show changes 
be numerous next season? 

A. They sure will. As mentioned 
above, there will be 35 shows new to 
tv networks at night alone, including 
new shows put on late this season that 
will continue in the fall. In addition 



FALL NIGHTTIME TV LINEUP 

For daytime lineup see pages 92-95 



HtAVY TYPE INDICATES NEW SHOW IN SLOT. SEE 
-OOTNOTE. BLANK MEANS SHOW IS NOT YET SET. 



7 

pm 
7:15 

7:30 

7:45 

8 

8:15 
8:30 
8:45 

9 

9:15 
9:30 
9:45 

10 

10:15 
10:30 
10:45 

11 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



You Asked 
For It 

Skippy Peanut 

Btr. Dlv., Best 

Foods 

Guild. Bascom 

& Bonflgll 

Hy-L&r 



Feature Film* 

730-9 

(Package net 

set) 



Lassie 

Campbell Soup 

Hy-F BBDO 



Jack Benny 

alt. with 

Private Sec'y 

Aroer. Tobacco 

NT-F BBDO 



Feature Film* 
730-9 
(cont'd) 



The Ed Sullivan 

Show 
Lincoln-Mercury 

Dealers 
KY-L K&E 



It's a Great 
Life* 
Chrysler- 
Plymouth Dealers 
MeCann- 
Hy-F Erickson 



Frontiers* 
(3 weeks In 4) 
Reynolds Metals 
NY-F Seeds 



Colgate Sunday 

Hr. 

(3 weeks In 4) 

Colg.-Palmollve 

HY- L&F Esty 

Spectaculars 

IN COLOB 

7 :30-9 

(1 week In 4) 

Sunbeam, 

Perrln-Paus 

Maybelllne, 

Gordon Best 

Louis Howe. 

D-F-S 

NY-L 



there will be at least 20 other night- 
time changes of one kind or another, 
including changes in time slots and 
switches from one network to another. 
ABC TV for example, has picked up 
shows from both Du Mont and CBS. 
And there are more changes to come. 



Q. Where will most of the pro- 
gram changes take place at night? 

A. Although CBS TV is the leader 
in time billings among all the net- 
works, there will be more program 
changes taking place on that network 
than on NBC TV and ABC TV put 
together. Part of the reason is the 
web's revamping of its 7:30-8:00 p.m. 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 

Kukla, Fran & No network 

Olllo programing 

co-op 



Chance of a 

Lifetime* 

Emerson Drug 

L & N 

Lentherlc. C&W 

NY-L 



Stork Club 
co-op 
NY-L 



Break the Bank 

Dodge 
NY-L Grant 



No network 
programing 



GE Theatre 
General Electric 
NY-L&F BBDO 



Alfred Hitch- 
cock Presents* 
Bristol-Myers 
Hy-F Y&R 



Appointment 

with 

Adventure 

(tentative) 

P. Lorlllard 

Y&R 



What's My Llnef 

Bemlngton-Band 

Y&R 
Jules Montenler 
Earle Ludgln 

NY-L 



Tv Playhouse 
Goodyear, Y&R 
Philco, Hutchlns 

(alt. sponsors) 
NY-L 



Loretta Young 

Show 

Procter & Gamble 

NY-F B&B 



slots during the week, the motive for 
which has been explained above. The 
slew of situation comedies being re- 
placed on CBS TV is another factor. 
Drastic revisions have taken place 
in the CBS TV nighttime lineup on 
Tuesday and Saturday. In the total 
network picture, Tuesday night takes 
the prize for the biggest programing 
face-lifting with at least a dozen 
changes already set. 



Q. What nighttime periods have 
not yet been programed? 

A. Saturday night is still wide open 
on ABC TV. The web has an hour 
dramatic show in mind for that evening 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS Mil 



Ch-L 



John Daly, News 

Miles Labs 
NY-L Wade 



Kid film show* 

(tentatively 

Jungle Jim or 

Shcena, Queen of 

the Jungle) 



Doug Edwards 

News* 

Amer Home Prods 

NY-L BB&T 



Robin Hood* 

Johnson & 

Johnson, Y&R 

Wildroot, BBDO 



Tv Reader's Burns & Allen 

Digest Carnation. 

Studebaker- Erwin Wasey 

Packard Goodrich, BBDO 

NY-L R&R Hj-F 



No network 
programing 



Tony Martin 

Assoc. Prods., 

Grey; 

Webster-Chicago 

J. W. Shaw 

Hy-L 7:30-45 

News Caravan 
B. J. Beynolds 
NY-L Esty 



Sid Caesar 

(3-9: 3 wks Id 4) 

Amer. Chicle, 

D-F-S 
Remington Rand 
Y&R 
Speidel, SSCB 
NY-L 



Voice of Talent Scout* 

Firestone CBS-Columbia, 
Firestone Tire Ted Bates 

NY-L Sweeney Lipton, Y&B 

(simul) & James NY-L 



I Love Lucy 
Procter&Gamble. 
BB&T 
General Foods 



Y&B 



Hy-F 



Title TBA* 
Ciba Pharm. 
J W Thompson 
NY-L&F 



December Bride 

General Foods 

NY-L B&B 




TBA 



No network 
programing 



Studio One 
Westlnghouse 
McCann- 
NY-L Erickson 



Producer's 

Showcase 

(Spectaculars) 

LN COLOB 

8-9:30 

(1 week In 4) 

Ford; BCA 

NY-L K&E 



Medic 

9-9:30 

(3 weeks In 4) 

Dow Chemical 
Hy-L MacManus 
John & Adams 

Robert Mont- 
gomery Presents 

9:30-10:30 
S. C. Johnson, 
NL&B 

Schick, K&E 
NY-L 



Robert Mont- 
gomery Presents 
9:30-10:30 
(cont'd) 



No network 
programing 



Kukla. Fran 
& Ollle 
co-op 
Ch-L 



John Daly News 
Tide Water Oil 
NY-L Buchanan 



Warner Brothers 
Presents* 
(7 30-830) 
Liggett & Myers, 
Cungham& Walsh 
GE. Maxon. Y&R 

Monsanto, 
NL&B, Gardner 
Hy-F 



Warner Brothers 

Presents* 

7:30-830 

(cont'd) 



Wyatt Earp* 
Parker Pen, 
Tatham-Lalrd 
General Mills 
NY-F D-F-S 



Make Boom for 

Daddy 
Amer. Tobacco, 
SSCB 

Dodge, Grant 
NY-F 



DuPont Theatre* 
DuPont 

BBDO 



No network 
programing 



Doug Edwards 

News* 

Amer. Tobacco 

NY-L SSCB 



Name That 

Tune* 

Whitehall Dlv.. 

Amer. Home 

Prods. 

BB&T 



Navy Log* 

Sheafler Pen. 

Russel Seeds 

Maytag 

McCann- Erickson 

NY-F 

You'll Never 

Get Rich* 

(Phil Silvers*) 

R. J. Reynolds; 

Estv 
Amana Refrlg. 
Maury. 
Lee & Marshall 



Show not 

decided* 

Pharmaceuticals 

K letter 

Carter, SSCB 



Bed Skelton 

Pet Milk, 

Gardner; 

S. C. Johnson 

Hy-L NL&B 



No network 
programing 



Dinah Shore 
Chevrolet Dire 

Campbell - 

Hy-L Ewald 

News Caravan 

R. J. Beynolds 

NY-L Esty 



Milton Berle 

(13 shows) 

Martha Raye 

(13 shows) 

8-9 

Sunbeam. 

Porrin-Paus 

RCA; Whirlpool 

Hy-L K&E 



Bob Hope 
(6-8 shows) 



Name's the 
Same* 
Ralston-Purlna 
Guild, Bascom 
& Bonflgll 
NY-L 



No network 
programing 



The $64,000 

Question* 

Revlon Prods. 

NY-L Welntraub 



See It Now 
(Sponsorship 
to be set) 
NY-L&F 



Dinah Shore 

(2 shews) 

Chevrolet 

Campbell- 

NY-L Ewald 



Fireside Theatre 
Procter & Gambia 
NY-F ComptOD 



Armstrong Circle 

Theatre: alt. with 

Pentiac Hour* 

9:30-10:30 

Armstrong Cork; 

8B00 

Pontlae 

MacM. J&A 

NY-L 



Armstrong Circle 

Theatre: alt. with 

Pontile Hour* 

930-1030 

(cont'd) 



Big Town* 
Lever Bra*. 
SSCB. McC-E. 
OBM 

A.C. Spark Plug 
NY-F Brother 



ABC 

Kukla. Frai 
Ollle 
co-op 
Ch-L 



John Daly. I 

Miles Lai 

NY-L Y 



Dlsneyiaa 

T:30-8* .; 
Amer MoU 

Geyer 

Amer. DB 

Campbell 

Mithun 

Derby Fat 

McCano- 

Erlckson 

SSCB 



Dlsneyiar 
7:30-83' 
(cont'd) 



Shew s> 

decided' 

Amer. Tali 

SSCB 

Oelce Pre 

Cant 

I 



Masquers 

Party 

Knomark » 

Emll Mot 

Pnarmaceut 

Kletter 



NY-L 



Penny te 

Million' 

ShaefTer P 

Russel Sc 

Brown & V> 

Ted Bat 

NY-L 



Wednesday II 

Fights* j 

Pabst Brnj 

Warwl I 

l| 

Menus! i 

10 am te 

McE. Kl| 
Var-L 



Henny & Rl 
(following 
till IIP 



•Refers to new shows, al.«o shows which change time slots or network, including new 
shows and changes starting lale this 6eaon. Where shows have multiple sponsors. 



agencies are listed In same order as clients. Origination-: NY means New York. Hy 
means Hollywood. Ch means Chicago. L means lire, F means 91m. AH times EST. 



hut DO Balfl U \it. \l><- l\ in atlili- 

i ion, liu^ (Our nighttime half boun -till 
open to programing in network time 

(lurinj; the week, two on \londa\ and 
tWO on ThurMlay. There arc aNo two 

half-hour periods on NBC 1\ and one 
on CBS I \ not yet programmed in the 
10:30-11:00 p.m. periods. While these 
periods are station time, both net- 
works have programed them in the 
past ami intend to continue doing so. 



Q. Are the networks expanding 
their programing in station time? 
A. On the balance, no. CBS TV has 

moved it- Doug l.dwards news strip 

into the 7:15-7:30 p.m. -lot. which is 



station time, but on the other band it 
has returned the 1 1 .00-1 l :l "> p.m. 
period on Monday, Wednesdai and 
I- 1 idaj i loi meil\ ix . upied bj the 
Longjnes Chronoscope) back to the 
stations. I he most sctivel) programed 
periods in station time are the 10: 10 
to 1 1 :00 p.m. slots. CBS I \ moved 
into that period during the week about 

tWO yean ago to he followed a \eai 

later bj NBC TV, which has been 
programing ever] weekdaj except 
Mondaj . During the <\r. . I IBS I V will 
program bom 10:00 a.m. straight 
through to 5:00 pan. bul this doesn't 
represent anj expansion in the < urrenl 
schedule. NBC I \ which has been 
having daytime programing trouble, is 



DnMONT Wl r>.-..,ng Hasap 

ul |>rr-,rn| < iiinpritea 

iv«i> tpoaaon «l ihow - o»bIj 

■ i. lli« nl.l.l of • "••n»pl>i( .( II. 

I.. I.ulk -I I, ,,,k|„ g 

I" *'" •I"'"'"" .... 

■k"« lo film .1. il,, 1. 1. ..alas w, m . 

"■. law I I" i' ••'•!• •■■' II t ■(■!, 

l*u Ra**t*1 iliuw. ..ul.l Irml I.. It* 
|.l..r.| ..,, . .|,.,| |,., |, ,,| 

■ urk ili.ra.lrr wuul'l lis r li , . 

ProfMilona: • 04) 

to ooncl'ji 

•rtgtnallon: NY. lit* 

\t Undid*. Me.:. • , 

Coop, origination: NY. lira 

Htudlo IT. T\iee.lart. 1 50 » 00 
(sponsor. Iloina : Af.nrj. Maxoa 
OligtWliMI N'T. lire 

ilonel F'Abi ,i 

ilnsllon' rarlui. Mie 



IESDAY 



nct» >fk 

<•«!■.■ ln»- 



nU|. 

Ludgl* 



Eiiie 

tershlp 

I Mt) 



NBC 



No network 
programing 



Cok* Tim* 

Coca-Col* 

NT-L D'Arcy 

News Car*T*n 

Plymouth 
NT-L Ayer 



Screen Dlr»ct*r*' 

Playhexisa* 

E*>tman-K«l*k 

NV-F JWT 



Father Knm 

SHI* 

Scott Paper 

NY-F JWT 



Million*!!* 

Colfst* 

F Bty 



Kraft Tr 

Theatre 

Kraft Foods 

NY-L JWT 



ThU It Tour 
US* 

Hazel Bishop. 

Spectot 
Procter A Gtmhle 
Compton 
Hy-L 



TBA 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS MU 



Kukl*. Fran A 
Olll* 
co-op 
Ch-L 



John Daly. New* 
Tide Water Oil 
NT-L Buchanan 



Lone Banger 

General Mill* 

(alt. sponsorship 

to be let ) 
NT-F D-F-S 



Blshoo She*** 
Admiral 

Erwln, 
NY-L Watey 



Stop the Music* 
Quality Jewlrt 

Netehl 
NY-L Qr*y 



Star Tonight 

Brlllo Mfg. 

NY-L JWT 



No network 
programing 



No network 

procramln* 



Doug Edward* 

News* 
Amer. Tooaee* 
NY-L 8SCB 



Sgt. Pr**t*t» 
of th* Yukon- 
Quaker Oat* 
Wherry, Baker 
NY-F A Tllden 



B*b Cummlngi 

Shew* 
R. J. Reynold* 
NY-F E»ty 



Climax 
(3 weeks In 4) 
8hower of Start 

IN COLOR 

(1 week In 4) 

8:30-9:30 

Chrytler 

McCann- 

Hy-L Erlckion 



Climax; 

8hoscer of 8tars 

8:30-9:30 

(cont'd) 



Four-Star 

Playhouse 

Singer Sewing; 

Brlitol-Myers 
NT-F TAB 



Johnny Carton 

Show* 

(10-10:30 *r 

10-11) 

Revlofl. 

Weintnub 

General F**d* 

YAR 



No n- ■ 
programing 



Dinah 8hor* 
Cherrolet Dirt. 
Campbell- 
Hy-L Ew»ld 



Now* C*r»rtn 
B. J. Boynoldi 



NT L 



Esty 



Tou Bel Tour 

LIf* 

DeSoto Motor 

DIt.. Chry»l*r 

NT-F BBDO 



The Pe*pl*'s 

Choir** 

(Jackie Cooper) 

Borden Co 
NY-F YAR 



Dragnet 
Liggett A Myers 
NT-F CAW 



Ford Theatre 

Ford Motor 

NT-F JWT 



Lux Video 

Theatr* 

10-11 

Lerer Bra*. 



Hy-L 



JWT 



FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Kukl*. Fran 

A Olll* 

eo- op 

Ch-L 



John Daly. Newt 

Ml let L*bs 
NT-L W*de 



Rln Tin Tin 
National Biscuit 
Hy-F KAE 



Oxrle A Harriet 
Hotpolnt. Mazon 

Quaker Oatt 
NT-F JWT 



Treasury Mea la 

AetlM* 

Chevrolet 

Cambell- 

NY-F Ew.ld 



Dollar a Second 

Mogen Darld 

Wine 

Welti A 

NT-L Cellar 



The Vlt* 

Sterling Drug 

NT-F D-F-S 



Down You Go- 
Western Union 
(alt. sponsor) 
NY-L 

Albert- Frank- 
Gurnther-Law 



work 
programing 



No network 
programing 

Doug Edwards 

Newt* 
Pharmaceutical! 
NY-L Klotter 



My Friend 
Flleka* 
(sponsorship 
to b* tot) 



M*m* 

General Foods 

NT-L BAR 



Our Miss 

Brooks' 

General Foods 

Hy-F YAR 



Crusaders* 
R. J. Reynolds 
NY-F Esty 



Schlltt Play- 

h*UM* 

Schlitr Brewing 
NY-F LAN 



Th* Lineup 
Brown A Wmtn. 

Ted Batet 
Procter A Gamble 
Hy F T*R 



Person to Parnoo 
Amoco. K*tx 

Hamm Br. CM 
Elgin. YAR 

STL 



No network 
programing 



Coke Tim* 

Coca Col* 

NT-L I> Arcy 

News Cara-an 

Plymouth 

NT-L Ayer 



Truth *r 

Consequences* 

P. Lorlllard 

Hy-L LAN 



Life of Riley 

Gulf Oil 

NT-L TAR 



Big Story 
Amer. Tobacco: 

Slmonlx 
NT-LAP 



New pr*gram* 

Campbell Soup 

BBDO 



Catalcale of 

Sport* 

10 pm to eoncJ 

Gillette 

NT-L Mason 



Rod Barber's 

Caraar* 

(10:4-5 or at 

null of «ght) 

Stat* Fart* las. 

NY-L NLAB 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS MIC 



No network 
programing 



TBA 



Gen* Atttry 
•igley Jr 
NT F BAR 



Boat th* Clock 

Hylftnl* 
NT L JWT 



Stap* Skew* 
Nestt*. Bryaa 
Houston 

PAG Caeaplen 

NYL 



Tk* Honey 



Buiek 
NV-F Kudaor 



■tag •- ■■ • 

H aasa 

P. Lorlllard 

NT-L LAN 



• . « .ir* J»a* 

(3 wkt ia 4) 

030-1* 

Procter A Grmkl* 

Cooaptta 

Fare) Star 

Juki lee- 

10 shews, west 

IN COLOR 

(I wk I* 4, 

f JO II 

Ford JWT 



:•• gasjgga* t 



New pragraw* 

•win 

JWT 



Perry Cease* 
St 
Ow- 
J W Shaw 

lat'l Cellwcattaa. 

FCAB 

Gold Val Was 

Near.** Caea. 
NYL MCB 



Penal* Are 

Faery* 

MJO: 3 wkt I* 4 

Torn. 

Paper. Met* 

Hy-F FCAB 

Tnoee 

1J0-10: 3 >kt 
In i 

ITy up Faikesr 



BpartMuIan 

»10 3* 
(1 wk 

. ■ . 
NT L Broth** 



Gunswekc* I - -c Qgl -I 

10-1030 (3 week* la 4) 

(3 weeks la 4) Amour: FCAB: 

Liggett A My*rt Prt V]Xk 

CAW By L Gardaar 



5*o network 
ptBBfgtgi -^ 



r>*^>o R.-rr. 

Tbaatr* 
(3 week* In 4) 

Ar^euse*-Bj(-r. 
NT-F D'Arcy 



Tour Hit Pared* 
Ajsvrr Tobacco. 

BBDO 
W»ixe:-Hudnut 

BBDO: 
NT L 



Network fr 



too busy with its current show slots to 
do anything about the 1:00-3:00 p.m. 
period, which will remain in station 
time. This past season's programing 
expansion took place primarily on 
CBS TV in the morning (The Morning 



: ALL DAYTIME TV LINEUP 

10 a.m. lo 2 p.m. 
•or 2 p.m. lo 6 p.m. programs turn page 



HEAVY TYPE INDICATES NEW SHOW IN SLOT. SEE | 
FOOTNOTE. BLANK MEANS SHOW IS NOT YET 



11:4 

12 

12:15 
12:30 
12:45 



1:15 



1:30 



1:45 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS 



NBC 




Wild Bill 

Hickok 

Kellogg Co. 

NY-F Burnett 




No network 
programing 



for Today 
Faith for Todv. 
NY-L Bockhlll 



Wlnky Dink and 

You 
Ideal Toy Corp. 
NY-L Grey 



Contest Carnival 

Quaker Oats Co. : 

WherTS', Baker 

& Tilden 

Atlantic City. NJ 



Capt. Harts & 
His Pets 

Ham Mtn Prods 

Harlman 
Ch-L 



No network 
programing 

Youth Wants 

to Know 
Gen Dynamics 
Morey, Humm 
& Johnstone 



Wash- 1. 



Show) and on NBC TV at night I To- 
night) and these shows will continue. 
Saturday and Sunday daytime have a 
lot of wide open programing spaces 
but aside from football on Saturday 
afternoons on NBC TV and CBS TV, 
there are no new programing plans. 



Q. What's the film-vs.-live pic- 
ture on the networks? 

A. While all shows are not set yet. 
there appears a small decline in the 
number of live sponsored shows at 
night. A comparison of the coming fall 
schedule (119 shows) with last 
October's schedule 1 133 shows) dis- 
closes the following: 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS 



Garry Moore 

Bristol-Myers 

DCSS 10-10:15 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Prudential Ins. 

Calkins & 

Holden 

SUleyMfg: R&R 

NY-L Alt m 



Arthur Godfrey 
Bauer & Black 
Leo Burnett 
m 10:30-15 



Bristl Myre.Y&B 

m.w 10:45-11 
Var-L 



Godfrey (cont'd) 
Lever: pepsodent 

m.w 11:11:15 
FC&B 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Pillsbury Mills 
m-th 11:15-30 
Burnett 



Strike It Bich 
Colgate- 
Palmolive 



NY Y 



Esty 



Valiant Lady 

General Mills 

NY-L D-F-S 




Search for Tooi'w 
Procter & Gamble 
NY-L B-B-T 



Guiding Light 

Procter & Gamble 

NY-L Compton 



Jack Paar Show 




No network 
programing 



Welcome 

Travelers 
Procter & Gamble 
Ch-L D-F-S 



\m 



So far, there are 62 live sponsored 
shows scheduled for the fall: last 
October the number was 74. There 
are 49 film shows set for the fall, 
while last year the figure was 53. 
There are eight live-plus-film shows 
planned for next season, while last 
year there were six. It is probable 
that, by the time the fall schedule is 
firm, there will be a slight increase in 
the number of film shows over last 
year. 

All in all it appears that live and 
film shows may have found a balance 
for the moment. The previous trend to 
film has been offset by spectaculars and 
the one-hour dramatic shows. 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Ding Dong 

School 

10-10:45 

P&G: B-B-T 

alt m 10:15-30 

Ch-L 



People at Home 
(Arlene Francis) 

participations 
NY-L4F 



Home 
m-f 11-12 
(participations; 
eight 1-min com- 
mercials an hour 

available) 
NY L&F 



Garry Moore 
Miles Labs 
Wade Adv 
lu 10-10:15 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Kellogg: Burnett 

tu 10:15-30 
NY-L 



Arthur Godfrey 
General Motors 
FC&B 



Ding Dong Scnl 

10-10:45 

Manhattan Soap 

Scheideler. Beck 

& Werner 

t.th 10-10:15 



Colgate: 
P&G: 
Ch L 



Bates 
B-B-T 



-, ,, _ People at Home 

Kel »«B. Burnett (A ;T Francit) 

tu.th 10:4d 11 Part)e , ponwl ' 

'» r -L NY-L&F 



dfrey (cont'd) 
Ton! Co 
Weiss A Geller 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Pillsbury Mills 
rath 11:15-30 

Leo Burnett 

Var-L 



Strike It Rich 
Colgate 



Home 

m-f 11-12 

panic sponsors 

ST-UF 



NY L 



Esty 




Tennessee Ernie 

Ford Show 
Procter & Gamble 

12-12:13 seg 
Hy-L B&B 



Feather Your 
Nest 
<o,uiz, Bud 
Collyer) 
Colgate- 
Palmolive 
all d 12:30-45 
NY -L Esty 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Love of Life 
Araer Homo Pr 
NY-L B-B-T 



Search for Tom'w 
Procter & Gamble 
NY-L B B-T 



Guiding Lieut 
Procter ft Gamble 



NY L Compton 



Jack Paar Shtr 
(Sponsors net 
set) 
NY-L 



Welcome 

Travelers 

Procter & Gamble 

Ch-L D-F-S 



Tennessee Ernie 

Ford Show 
Procter & Gamble 

12-12:13 seg 
Hy-L BAB 



Feather Yoor 
Nest 
Colgate- 
Palmolive 
altd 12:30-45 
NY-L Esty 




No network 
programing 



•Shows In bold type designate new programs, also those with changes in time slots 
or nelwmk. Before 10 am.. NBC TV offers "Today'' and CBS TV "The Morning 



S'iow." koih-7-9 a.m. Abbreviations: NY roei 
means Chicago. L means live. F means film 



- N«.« York, Hy means Hollywood. Cli 
All times are Easjein Standard Time. 



w 

ABC 

u 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 
m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Q. Arc network shows getting 
longer? 

A. Ii would !"• mora accurate to sa) 
that there are more long shows. There 
will be more periodic lnnir-aiiil-.i-li.ili 
show- next season whal with NBC I \ 'a 
// id* It ide U orld plus it- eight 
Maurice Evans productions and CBS 
rV's li> Jubilee shows plus its [out 
planned midweek extravaganzas. How- 
ever, bo i. ii as every-week programing 
goes, the Dumber of hour shows next 
season will be do greatei than during 

the past season. I he onl\ major alter- 
ation in program lengths is on CBS I V 
where half-hour show- replace 15- 
minute -how- in the 7:30-8:00 p.m. 

Weekday periods, \ minor alteration 



i- \l>< I \ - pi. nine. I program of 
feature Elms lor an hour and-a-hali 
ever] Sunday. 

I bis w ill be the first regular pro- 
gram "t feature films on network t\. 

I he ratings of this show will be 
wan bed careful]) bj program men 
.1- well as the ratings on the two \le\- 
andei Kords mo\ ies "< onstanl 
Husband" and "Richard III" whk h 
will premiere on M'.< l\ next season 
before release t" U.S. mot ie bouses. 
I be latter ino\ ie i- almost three hours 
long and while the popularity of 
Shakespeare maj be debatable, it i- 
lairK certain that those who want to 
watch the film h ill not be available to 
the competitive aetworks foi s full 



N . in hi I. 1 1 



e\ ening. I he point i- not that \ i< 

m ill not be able to te u thi 

iwaj from 5ii I aureix e Oliviei , w |,,, 

pl.iv - Hi. h.ml i . I he point ii 

the long -how keeps the viewei glued 

to one i hannel t"i ■> subsi i iod 

of time. "-H that if movies 

on the aetworks, sdverti 

l.nnK look for longci network bI 
oi more long shon s, n hi< hi 

yOU want to put it. 

CI— T — C M 

Q. In how many markets will 
network clearances be easier this 
fall compared with last? 
A. Network i leai bih •■- an expo 



LNESDAY 

TBS NBC 



kfoor* 
taanli 

1am Laird 

10 H> IS am 



d r - 

10 11 30 
L 



tl Msr..YAR 

10 I'. II 



cont'd I 

peps.xlem 
1! 11:15 

*B 



Ding Dong 
School 
10 10 I. 
Wfcadu I 

otalthie 
Tatham I-alnt 

eti-L 



Peoaie at Home 
(Arlene Francis) 
Partic tpenteri 

NY-LAF 



In 11 
Burnett 



rlke It Hi - 
L 



H >m.- 
m-f 11 11 
partlr 
NY U*F 



of Life 
Home Pr 
L B-B-T 



Tennessee Ernie 
fmt Show 

Procter A Gamble 
II II 18 Ml 

M.I. BAB 



Feather Your 
Natt 

Colgate - 

Palmollre 

alt I 12:30 15 

NY 1. Etty 



P«a»r Shim 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Welcome 

TYarelers 
r A Gamble 
r> F 9 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS M.< 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Carry Moon 

s.t^t Paper 

J W. Thompson 

th 1" 10 IS 



Chun King: JWT 
Tonl: Burnett 

alt th l 
NY 1. 



Arthur Qodfra 
Don Chomleal 

McManus. John 
A A. lams th 



nine Hong School 

10 10 r. 
Manhattan BMP 
si;\« 10 IS M 



Kellogg Co 
tu.th 10 I' 11 
Burnett 



Godfrey i cont'd) 
GM ■•utidalre 
FOAB 



Oerber Prodi 

It II .10 
Ch-L. 



Peeple at Home 
(Arlene Francis) 
Pafile sponsors 
NYLAF 



PllUbury Mills 
m-ih 111". SO 

Leo Burnett 

Ver L 



Strike It Rich 

Clglt- 

N\ i. Esty 



Valiant Lady 
m tu. th 

NY I. 



f Life 
Amer Home Pr 

ny i. b b r 



Search for Tom'w 
Procter & Gamble 
NY [. it B T 



Home 
m-f 1112 
Partic sponsors 
NY L4F 



Tennessee Emie 

Ford Show 
Procter A Gamble 

U-1S:1S «eg 
Bj I. BAB 



Feather \"<*ir 

Colgate- Palmolire 
alt d l - 



R. 4. Reynolds: 
ang Light wtnston elds 

• r A Gamble IS mln. 3 th In 1 
NT-Ij CVmpton NY 1 »>»» 



Jack Paar Shew 
Sponsors net «t 
NY-L 



Welcome 

Traeelers 
Procter A Gamble 
Ch-L D-F-S 



Pi ■*:«ork 

programing 

m-f 



ABC 



No network 
programing 

m f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

■ •( 



'work 
imtnf 
m-f 



FRIDAY 

CBS NBC 



Garry 
Swlf 
I W Thompson 
f 10 lo r, 



Paper 

1 W Tl 

r lo 



SOS: 

Tonl Burnett 

alt l II 



CiWUtV' 

Burnett 

f 10 IS 11 
NY I. 



Garry '■ 
(cont'd) 
Yardley of I^idn 
Asrr 11-11:11 



- 
10 I ■ 
Ooigala BabM 

all ( 1" 1" II 

General Mills 
Tat ham Lstlrd 

f 10 
eii I. 



Pcetsle at Heme 
(Arlene Francis) 
Partic UMisrt 
NYLAF 



Borden Foods 

:\f> 30 

NY L 



Strike It Rich 
.•ate 
N\ I. 



BaasM 
m I 11-11 
Partic sponsors 
Nt ur 






Vallar,' 

General Mill. 
D-F S K R 

NY I. 



Lose of Life 
Am'T H-»me Pr 



B B T 



Search ( 

Prater A Gamble 

NY I, BUT 



Guiding 
NY I. ( 



Jack Paar Shew 
Spesraere net set 
NYL 



Welcome 

Tmrelert 
Procter A Gamble 
Ch-L P F - 



Tmnenee Ernie 

Ford 8how 
Procter A Gamble 

IS »eg 
Ilr I. BAB 



Featiw 

kilceie Palraoiiea 
alt d I 
Nt I. 



'•work 
procramlng 
m f 



SATURDAY 
\BC CB§ NBC 



procr.mlni 





. I^e 




s*. - 


















« 








•work 
programing 



Caetaie 
Mletaiaht 
WaeaVer C. 
Tsthsss Lalre 
NY-F 



T»i». ef rke 
Tsaaa Raetwi 

Cseeral Mills 
Tathssi Laird 
NV.F 



' 



TkuatSar 
Gee FesXs 

BT-I a A i 



Mr 

Hi 



No network 



Th* Big Top Oe-lt-Y 

•sir? IJ-I 

m-tfc 
Ayee H Y I 



■work- 
programing 



l^r» BSBBM) 

Oenexal Mills 
NT F D-F-S 



Uncle Johnny 

Ohm 
Leret 

NY L 



No r- 
prearraain* 



IV-r 
Preriew i IS mil 

Sponsor not se 



Network tc 



to be easier in 25 of the top 100 mar- 
kets. This was brought out in a station 
study of the top 100 by the NBC Re- 
search & Planning staff. The NBC 
group compared September 1954 with 
the picture for this coming September. 
Actually 29 markets gained either new 



FALL DAYTIME TV LINEUP 

2 p.m. to 6 p.m. 
For 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. see previous page 



HEAVY TYPE INDICATES NEW SHOW IN SLOT. 
POOTNOTE. BLANK MEANS SHOW IS NOT YET 



2:15 



2:30 



2:45 



3:15 



3:30 



3:45 



4:15 
4:30 
4:45 



5:15 



:30 



5:45 



6 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Ainer Inventory 
Wash L 



No network 
programing 



No network 
programing 



No network 
programing 



Amer Forum 
Wash-L 



NBC TV Opera 

(2:30-4) 

Six pert In 

'55- '56 season 

NY-L 



No network 
programing 



Let's Take 
A Trip 
Var-L 

BUB 



Now & Then 
NY-L 



Zoo Parade 
Quaker Oats 

NL4.B alt- sun 



vhf or uhf stations, but four of these 
also lost a station, leaving them the 
same number of stations as last year. 



Q. What are the markets among 
the top 100 which have more sta- 
tions than last year? 

A. These are the markets which 
gain one vhf. These are listed in 
order of 1955 population along with 
the station total for September 1955. 
Minneapolis (four vhf as of Sep- 
tember) ; Houston (two vhf) ; Port- 
land, Ore. I two vhf, one uhf) ; Provi- 
dence (two vhf, one uhf) ; Fort Worth 
(two vhf) ; Phoenix (four vhf) ; San 



Amer Chicle 

Ch-L D-F-S 

alt wk sponsors 



Maurice Evans 
Presents Hall- 
mark Hall of 
Fame 
(4-5 30 once 
a month) 
Some IN COLOR 

Hall Bros. 
NY-L FC&B 



No network 
programing 



Face the Nation 
NY-L. 

BUS . 



Super Circus 

5-6 
Kellogg Co 

Leo Burnett 
% hr alt wk 



Chunky Chocolate 

Hilton & Rlgglo 

>.-, hr alt wk 



Dixie Cup Co 
Hicks & Grelst 
hi hr alt wk 
NY-L 



Omnibus 
5-6:30 
Aluminium Co 
JWT 

Scott Paper 
JWT 

(Two adtl'l spon- 
sors not set) 
NY-L&F 



Wide Wide World 

(4-5:30 twice 

a month) 

sponsors not set 

Var-L 



Maurice Evans 

Presents 

(see above) 

Wide Wide World 

(see above) 



Capt. Gallant of 
Foreign Legion 

Heinz Foods 
Maxon 
NY.Hy-F 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS 



NBC 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Robert Q. Lewis 
NY-L 



Art Linkletter 
Lever Bros. 
BBDO 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Pillsbury Mills: 

Burnett 

Hy-L 



Big Payoff Ted Mack's 

Colgate-Palmolive Matinee 

NY-L Esty NY-L m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Bob Crosby '* Pa** *• B « 

General Mills Married 

Knox-Reeves Procter & Gamble 

3:45-4 seg 3:45-4 seg 

Hv-L NY-L B&B 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Brighter Day 

P&G 

NY-L Y&R 



The Secret Storm 
Am Home Prods 
NY-L B-B-T 



On Your Account 

(Win EUlott) 
Procter & Gamble 
NY-L B&B 



Way «4 the World 

Borden Co 
NY-L Y&R 



First Love 

Jergens Co 

Phila-L Orr 



World of 

Mr Sweeney 

Procter & Gamble 

NY-L B&B 



Modern Romances 
"olcate-Palmollve 
NY-L Houston 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 5-6 

Armour 
HH & McD 

Bristol-Myers 
DCSS 

Campbell Soup 
Leo Burnett 

Carnation Co 
Erwi n, Wase y 
M ar s: Bur nett 
Welch Grape Jc 
K&E 

General Mills 
Knox-Reeves 
Hy-F 



Pinky Lee 
Show 
Partic sponsors 
Hy-L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Howdv Doody 

IN COLOR 

Standard Brand; 

NY-L Bates 



Jose (one vhf) ; Salt Lake City (three 
vhf) ; Wichita (one vhf, one uhf) ; 
Mobile (two vhf) ; Huntington (two 
vhf) ; El Paso (three vhf) ; Spokane 
(three vhf) ; Shreveport (two vhf) ; 
Beaumont (one vhf, one uhf) ; Little 
Rock (two vhf). 

The following markets gain two vhf 
stations: 

Tampa (two vhf, one uhf as of Sep- 
tember I ; Sacramento (two vhf, one 
uhf). 

The following markets gain one uhf 
station : 

Boston (two vhf, two uhf as of Sep- 
tember) ; Miami (one vhf, one uhf) ; 
San Antonio (two vhf, one uhf) ; 
Jacksonville (one vhf, two uhf) ; 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Robert Q. Lewis 

Miles Labs 
Wade 2-2:15 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Helene Curtis 
t 2:15-30 
Earle Ludgin 
NY-L 



Art Linkletter 

Kellogg Co 
Leo Burnett 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Pillsbury Mills 
Leo Burnett 
Hy-L 



Big Payoff 
Sponsor not 
set tu. th 
NY-L 



Bob Crosby 

Tonl Co 

Weiss & Geller 

Hy-L 



Ted Mack's 

Matinee 

NY-L m-f 



It Pays to Be 

Married 
Procter i. Gamble 

3:45-4 sea 
NY-L B&B 



„ . . ., Way of the World 

Brighter Day ^^^ t , ^ 

"&■*** «*t tu th> 

NY L Y&R Mt *"' ml 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



The Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prs 
NY-L B-B-T 



On Your Account 

(Win Elliott) 
Procter & Gamble 
NY-L B&B 



First Love 

Jergens Co 

Phila-L Orr 



World of 

Mr Sueency 

Procter & Gamble 

NY-L B&B 



Mickey Mouse 

Club 

5-6 

(see men) 

Hy-F 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Modern Romances 
Colgate-Palmolive 

sp alt days 
Brvan Houston 
NY-L 



Pinky Lee 

Show 

Partic sponsor: 

General Foods 

Y&R 

Hy-L 



Howdy Doody 
IN COLOR 
Kellogg Co 

Leo Burnett 

Dolgale- Palmolive 

Ted Bates 

NY-L 



Shows in bold tyve designate new programs, also those with changes in time slots or 
network. From 6-7 p.m. (not charted), the networks have no programing except on 



Sunday. On CBS TV "Omnibus'' runs till 6:30 p.m.: "You Are There." sponsored 
by Electric Cos. and Prudential Ins. is slotted from 6:30-i p.m. NBC T\ has Meet 



No netwo 
programln 
m-f 



No netwo 
programi- 
ng 



No netwi 
programi 
m-f 



Mickey N 
Club 
5-6 
(see »e 
Hy-F 























y.lu,.rk It 




Harrisburg (three uhf); South Bend 


Q. In how many of the top 100 


ill < ompared w ith last, the 




i tWO uhf l . 


markets will full competition be- 


aho\r do not ne. e--.ir il "full" 




The following market! gain one vhf. 


tween the three major networki 


i ompetition aii> e some of tJ 




hut lo-e one uhf M well: 


be possible this fall? 


intermixed 1 . In so 1 uhf 




Milwaukee (two vhf, one uhf as of 


A. Onlj 34 of the top 100 marfceti 


affiliates may -u Jf »r fro 




September); Tulei (two vhf); Dei 


will have three ..r more operating 


• overage or |a< k oi uhf set i onversion 




Moines 1 two vhf | ; Stockton 1 one vhf | . 


stations, eil 

M ilh 2") mar 


ller \li( 01 11 


hf. com] 
mbei , accord 


\ truei picture of "full" competition 
i in be gotten b) totaling up the 




^el-. last Septi 






Lng to Mi* i .il< ul.itn.ii- 1 In- • 


numhei oi top 100 markets with tin 




Q. Are any of the top 100 mar- 


i- BUbjei t to .i 1 .il. iin amoiml of inter- 


oi more \hf and threi i uhf 




kets any worse off than last year 


pretation, according to one'i vie*, oi 


-t.il ion--. 




in the number of stations? 


how well a certain station tervei ■ 


' )n tin- oasis, there will be full 




A. Yes, three of them, all of which 


particular market. Thai i-. NBC ma) 


« ompetition in 23 of the top l |K| 




lose one uhf station, gain none. The) 


feel that station " \ serves such-and- 


markets this fall, of vsln< h . 




are: 


BUCh a market, while ( l\> ma\ feel it 


three or more \ hf stal 




Ubany, N.Y. lone vhf, one uhfi; 


doesn't 


have three or more uhf Stations. 1 USt 




Oklahoma Citj (two vhf, one uhf ) ; 


While it is apparent that there wil 


Septembei the < omparahle 




Charleston, W. Ya. lone vhf i . 


be more internetwork competition thi- 


irere: full competition in \'> mark. 




ESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 




SATURDAY 




CBS NBC 


ABC CBS 


NBC 


ABC CBS 


NBC 


ABC CBS NBC 




























rt a Lewis 






Robert Q. Lewis 






Robert Q. Laarti 












Prodi R«r 






2-2:15 sua 






Hrnwn A Wm«n 












1 w 2-1:15 












• Il »k 
























Bates 












en ,\|llli 






S C Johnson 
15-30 


















* 1 15 30 










Mills 








1 ■ . 




< BBDO 


No network 


No network 


NT-L NLAB 


No network 


No network 


M I. HIIIX" 


:»ork 




College Football 
1 pa u caatcj 


1 or It* to eaakd 
BafaiitT KAC. 






programing 


programing 




programing 


programing 




programing 


No r- 


fire reglonaJ 






Link letter 
»er Bra. 

J 3:30 45 



m-f 


m f 


Art Llnklt-lter 
Kellogg Co 
Leo Burnett 
tu. th 2:30-45 


m-f 


m-f 


Art Llnklrtler 
- Bros. 
BBUO m.w.f 


m r 


programing 


tire.. 

(sponsors not aet> 
Vtt li 


Am Lvdglr.. 

Oeaeral Cigar 
YAK 




bury Mills 
tta 1:45-3 


Plllsbury Mills 
m th 2:45-3 


I'ln'-lPlile 
2:45 3 




Burnett 






Leo Burnett 






Hy L 












It Payoff 


Tr.l Mick's 




Big Payoff 


Ted Macks 




Big Payoff 


Mack's 










Colgate 


Matinee 




sus tu. th 


Matlnco 




Colgate 


Matinee 










I. Eity 


XV L m-f 




HY-L 


NY L m-f 




NY I. ElW 


NY 1. m r 














No network 
programing 

m-r 






No network 
programing 






No network 


.-. Football 


1 FootbaU 
















ragttfjg 


fee* aboea) 


(aw aboee) 




* Crnbr 






Bob Crosby 


















Itaonli Co 


It Pays to Be 




C A S.ranson 


It Pays to Be 




-,,- V 


It Pays ta Be 










B 3:30-45 


Married 




Tatham-Lalrd 


Married 




Gerber 1 


Married 










rr*l Mills 


Procter A Gamble 




th 3 :30- IS 


Procter A Gamble 




alt 1 3 30 4. r > 


Procter a> Gamble 










w.f 3:45-4 


3:45-4 set 




Scott Paper 


3:45-4 sat 




General Mills 


3:45 4 set 










. Beeees 


NY-L BAB 




J W Thompson 
Hy L 


NY-L BAB 




Kurt Rnrri 
H] L 


NY L BAB 










Uhler Pit 


Way at the World 




Brighter Day 


Way of the World 




Brighter Day 


Way at the World 










PAG 


Borden Co 




PAG 


(sponsor to be 




PAG 


Borden 










L TAB 


NY-L YAR 




NT-L TAR 


set tu. th) 




NY 1 TAR 


NY-L YAR 






1 PoatbaJI 


















I Secret Sturni 


First Lore 




The Secret Storm 


First Love 




Ttie Secret Storm 


First Ixwe 






lee* abo»»l 




Home Proda 


Jergens Co 




Amer Home Prs 


Jergens Co 




Am ' 


Jercrns Co 








L B B-T 


Phlli-L Ott 


No network 
programing 


NT -L B-B-T 


Phlla-L Orr 


No network 
programing 


NY 1. 11 11 T 


Phlla L Orr 


No network 












m-r 












programing 














Work) of 


m-f 




1 of 












Mr. Btjfjtgatf 






Mr Sweeney 






- reney 










Tour Account 
lr Elliott) 
In A Gamble 


Procter A Gamble 
NY I BAB 




On Tour Account 

(Win Elliott) 
Procter A Gamble 


PpHtcr J* Gamble 






■ r A C.imMr 












NY I. BAB 




On lour Account 
■Win Elliott) 
cr A Gamble 


HAH 


- 




US aalo post- 












I. BAB 


Modern Romances 
Cfclcate -PalmollTo 

sp alt days 
Bryan Houston 




NT L BAB 


M»lern Romances 
Colgate- Palmollre 

sp alt days 
Bryan Houston 




NY I. BAB 


n hVvnaneea 
.motile 
>p alt days 
Bryan Houston 






Dow CkssalcaJ 

Mm A Adasaa 
Tax L 






Pinky Lee 






Pinky Lee 






Pink 




• 






.rker Bill's 


Panic sponsors 






Partlc: Intl Shoe 




Barker Bills 


Par -i 










5-5:15 


General Foods 
TAB 

Johnsn A Johnsn 






B ll.vMcD 




Cart.*™ 


YAR tu.w.f 










•oeril Mills 






Hy L 




Gen Mills 


Hy L 










F F-sty 


Hy L 74Ut 


Mickey Mouse 






Mickey Mouse 


Eaty 
















Club 
5$ 
(set man) 
Hy-F 


No network 
programing 




Club 
5-6 

(see nest) 
Hy-F 


The New 




tt sri - | 


wort 
profTimlrr 






fo network 


Howdy Doody 


Howdy Doody 
IN COLOR 


''r»ly 
IN eoljOR 

■ n's 


pt •"».- .-.- 




i retraining 


IN COU)R 
Continental Bkg 






Kellogg Co 
Leo Burnett 




Revue 
IN COLOR 


HAMc 










■-f 


NT L Bates 






Standard Brands 
NT-L Bates 




NY L 


alt f ' 

i Grp Juice 
alt f 

M I. 










the Press" (Pen-American and Johns-ManTtlle) from 6 


6:30 p.m.. and "Boy Risers'' wood. Ch. Chiraco 1 


. ok in. lire. F means film All limes UfUsI are Ruirn 






iGeneral Foods) 


from 6:30 7 p m. 


Abbreviations Wt 


means New York. 


Hy Holly- SCI 


ndard Time 











ISettcork /r 



QUALITY 

IS OUR BUSINESS 



For COMPLETE 
FILM PROCESSING 




of which 17 had three or more vhf and 
two had three 01 more uhf. 

In other words, there has been a net 
gain for full network competition of 
only four markets. 



Q. What kind of clearances has 
the "third" network been getting? 

A. As of the end of May. ABC TV 
has been clearing 24 r r more stations 
than it did a year ago — 67 stations for 
the average nighttime show in May 
1954 and 83 stations in May 1955. In 
terms of increased coverage of tv 
homes, the greater clearances work out 
this way: 21'^ of ABC's programs 
covered more than 90% of U.S. tv 
homes in May 1955, compared with 
5% covering that many homes last 
year. In terms of 70% coverage, 79% 
of ABC's nighttime programs achieved 
that coverage in May this year com- 
pared with 68% of the programs a 
year before. 

As for affiliations, ABC TV has 43 
more affiliates than a year ago, has 218 
at latest count. There are now 201 
markets in which ABC has an affiliate. 



Q. What are the important mar- 
kets without full competition be- 
tween the three major networks? 

A. Among the top 25 markets in 
terms of population, the following do 
not have at least three vhf or three uhf 
stations: Boston, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, 
Buffalo, Houston, Milwaukee, New 
Orleans, Seattle, Portland, Ore.: 
Dallas, San Diego and Miami. 



O. Are network interconnections 
keping pace with the increased 
number of stations? 

A. Yes. As of 26 June there were 
364 stations in 238 cities intercon- 
nected via coaxial cable or micro-wave 
relay. This figure, which includes 
private links, compares with 298 
stations in 190 cities last June and 
137 stations in 91 cities during June 
of 1953. Of the 26 June 1955 inter- 
connected stations and cities, there 
are 162 stations in 119 cities linked 
to carry network color shows. 



Advertisers 



MOVIELAB FILM LABORATORIES, INC. S •JSZST i ,eading nc ' wo,k 

619 West 54th Street, New York 19, N. Y. JUdson 6-0360 A - The to P 10 spenders m 19o4. 



96 



SPONSOR 



acording to 1*1 14. were, in order of 
■pending: P&G, Colgate, H. J. 
Reynolds, Gillette, Genera] Motors, 
Genera] Foods, Unerican Tobacco, 

Chrvsler, (General Mills. Lever Bros. 



Q. Has there been much turn- 
over in leading network spenders? 
A. <)f the top 10 network tv spenders 
in 1050, 1MB figures -Imu. . .nl \ four - 
H. J. Reynolds, General Foods, Gen- 
eral Motors and American Tobacco — 
were among the 1954 top 10. Ford, 
the leading network client in 1950, 

WOB not even among the top 10 last 
\ear. 

PIB figures show there is more 
turnover among the leading spenders 
in network tv than in network radio. 
For example, of the top 10 network 
radio clients in 1048 only three were 
QOt among the 1954 top 10. 



Q. What industries spend most 
money in network tv? 

A. By and large the same ones who 
spend the most money in all PIB 
categories, though the rank of spend- 
ing is not quite the same. Industry 
leaders were, in the order of network 
tv spending last year, as follows: food, 
toiletries, tobacco, soap, auto, house- 
hold equipment and supplies, drui:-. 
On the average each one just about 
doubled its network tv investment 
since 1952. The group registering the 
greatest percentage advance in net- 
work tv spending since 1952 was the 
drug industry. However, it still does 
not rank as high relatively as it does 
in network radio, in which medium it 
was the third largest spender last 
vear. 



Q. What industry is most active 
in daytime network tv? 

A. \s might be expected, food. In 
the -pring of this year the number of 
advertisers by product groups was as 
follows: food, 18; household products, 
12. drug, nine; appliances, four; soap, 
four: tobacco, three. 



Q. Do most daytime sponsors ad- 
vertise only during the day on net- 
work tv? 

A. No. Eleven of the food accounts 
also advertise at night. So do eight of 
the household product sponsors, seven 




er winner; 



/ 



from the portfolio of. 



TPA 



Sales Builders 



This is the only show of its kind in all television. And 
its unique program content is matched by the audience and 
sales marks it keeps chalking up every day. 

Scheduled in the "children's hour," it comes up as one of 
the top-rated juvenile shows on the screen; in other 
periods, it does just as well! In market after market, 
Ra mar's pay-off audiences provide sales material for the 
station carrying this TPA feature. 

With Jon Hall available for commercials, Ramar sells aa 
divers a list of products as we've even seen: from candy 
bars (juvenile appeal) to gas and oil (juvenile appeal I. 

While this TPA property is smashing all distribution 
records (it was recently bought for over 35 markets in 
the South-East— one of the largest deals ever made in that 
area), good availabilities still remain. If you'd like to tie 
up with an amazing sales builder, get in touch with TPA 
—fast. 



Television Programs of America, Inc. 

York : h 7 Mddu I I MM 

Chicago: 203 X. Wabash Avenue 
Hollywood: W46 Sunset Boulevard 



!\etwork tr 



of the drug sponsors, three of the 
appliance sponsors, three of the soap 
sponsors and two of the tobacco 
sponsors. 



Foe tv 



Q. What is the status of fee tv? 

A. Recent moves point to a delay in 
FCC action on the question. While 
11 July was the deadline for rebuttal 
arguments and comments to the FCC, 
most of the important interests in- 
volved in the fee tv issue had asked 
for a delay in the deadline until 11 
September. This delay was granted by 
the commission on 30 June, and pub- 
lic hearings are expected to be held 
at that time. 



Q. Have there been any recent 
developments that may affect FCC 
decision-making on the fee tv 
issue? 

A. Spurred into action by the sud- 
den popular interest in the question 
and the vote-getting possibilities in- 
herent in this interest, members of 
Congress have started legislative moves 



which would circumscribe FCC action 
or take the issue out of the FCC's 
hands entirely. 

Representative Emanuel Celler of 
Brooklyn, chairman of the powerful 
House Judiciary Committee, has in- 
troduced a bill which would bar tv 
stations from charging for programs. 
This move, however, was offset by a 
proposed measure which would forbid 
the FCC to make a decision on fee tv 
against the "expressed will and desire 
of the people." 

There is still strong sentiment in 
Congress against hobbling the FCC. 
Chairmen of both Senate and House 
Interstate Commerce Committees have 
expressed the opinion that the FCC 
should carry the ball — at least for now. 



Q. What action has the advertis- 
ing profession taken on the fee 
tv question? 

A. Broadcasters aside, advertisers 
and agencies, with rare exceptions, 
have steered clear of this hot issue so 
far as public pronouncements go. One 
reason is that admen feel any ex- 
pressed opposition to fee tv might be 
regarded by the public as self-serving. 



In other words, the public might feel 
that all the advertisers are interested in 
are their commercials rather than the 
question of whether or not fee tv is 
good for the country. Another reason 
for the ad fraternity's silence is the 
common attitude that fee tv would 
never catch on, anyhow. This attitude 
was brought out in a sponsor survey 
on the subject (see "Would fee tv 
hurt the sponsor?" 16 May 1955). 



Q. What do admen think would 
happen if fee tv were approved? 

A. sponsor's survey of opinion on 
this subject brought out a widespread 
attitude that the public will not pay 
for tv programing as long as they can 
see it for nothing. Implicit in this was 
the feeling that commercial tv pro- 
graming will hold its own against any- 
thing the toll tv forces have to offer. 
This view is not shared by those clos- 
est to the battle lines — the broadcast- 
ers themselves — most of whom feel fee 
tv could damage free tv seriously by 
outbidding it for programing. CBS, 
for example, has stated that if fee tv 
were approved it would have no re- 
course but to go into the business itself 
even though the network made clear 






ALL 
THIS 







AND MICKEY 
MOUSE TOO 



Good shows make good 
adjacencies. KTRK-TV has 
changed the Houston 
television picture by giv- 
ing top entertainment for 
all the family. Call us or 
Blair TV. 



CHILDREN 

Bedelia Land 
Kitirick Comics 
Little Rascals 
Mickey Mouse 
Playschool 
Romper Room 
The Phantom Sheriff 



SPORTS 

Championship Bowling 
Gillette Fights 
Houston Buff Baseball 
Pabst Fights 
Pro Football 
Texas Outdoors 
Wrestling 



FAMILY 

Disneyland 

Make Room for Daddy 

Masquerade Party 

Ozzie and Harriett 

Patti Paige 

Rin Tin Tin 

Warner Bros. Presents 




■TV 



HOUSTON CONSOLIDATED TELEVISION CO. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: 
General Mgr., Willard E. Walbridge BLAIR-TV, 150 E. 43rd St., 

Commercial Mgr., Bill Bennett New York 17, N. Y. 

THE CHRONICLE STATION, CHANNEL 13, P. 0. BOX 12, HOUSTON 1, TEXAS 



ABC BASIC 



98 



SPONSOR 



\rltcork /i 



it w.i^ whole-hearted!) opposed to BU< li 

;i|)|>n>\ ,il. 

I be following arguments have been 

cited lor the belief thai toll tv would 

drive commercial t\ oil the air: 

The most popular t\ shows on com- 
mercial tv would naturally {iravitate 
to fee t\ because it would be more 
profitable for producer- and per- 
formers to do 10. It is >ui economic 
Lmprobabilitiy that a program pro- 
ducer or owner would -ta\ on free tv 
if lie can make more mone\ on fee t\. 
The fee t\ operators would natural!} 
seek the most popular shows so they 
can make as much money as possihle 

as well as recoup the cost of setting up 
and servicing the various devices to 
unscramble tv images. Fee tv forces 
would be able to outbid commercial 
tv for special attractions such as movie 
premieres, Broadway shows, special 
sports events and the like. 

It is also pointed out that if com- 
mercial tv were able to hold on against 
the fee tv onslaught, it would be a 
poor copy of the original. With audi- 
ences cut, the networks and stations 
would not he able to put on shows of 
high production quality. Commercial 
tv. in other words, cannot exist at half 
steam. 



Q. Would there be any commer- 
cials on fee tv? 

A. \\ hile the subscription tv forces 
cite the absence of commercials as one 
of their arguments, it is by no means 
certain that fee tv, if approved, would 
wind up as a non-commercial enter- 
tainment medium. Certainly adver- 
tisers would have no reason to stay- 
out of fee tv unless they were kept out. 
There has been some talk of using 
ad investments as a means of cuttin" 
the price of certain shows which would 
be too expensive for mass audiences. 
There has also been talk of tving in 
product sales to fee tv by enclosing a 
coin or slug in a package which would 
enable the buyer to tune in on a fee tv 
show for nothing. 

One adman told SPONSOR: '"You still 
can't lose the sponsor. If fee tv does 
go over with a bang, you can rest 
assured that it will be one of the 
biggest operations in the world be- 
cause every ad agency man will be in 
it— with a box top deal." 






11 JULY 1955 



by ONE Television Station! 



AMERICA'S 5th 
RICHEST MARKET 



INDIANA'S 2nd 

CITY CORPORATE 

AREA 




Let's take a close look at the South Bend market. The Metropol- 
itan Area of South Bend (population 232,000 is the Nation's 
5th richest in family income. The South Bend-Mishawaka City 
Corporate Area is Indiana's 2nd largest in income and sales. The 
9-county primary coverage area of South Bend's television station 
WSBT-TV has an Effective Buying Income of $1,165,630,000.00. 

WSBT-TV DOMINATES 
THIS GREAT MARKET! 

Hooper and Pulse show that no other station 
even comes close to WSBT-TV in share-of- 
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WSBT-TV : 

PRIMARY COVERAGE AREA: 9 R»h Cauntitt in 

Sorthrrn Indiana and Southern Michigan. 





A CBS BASIC OPTIONAL STATION 
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Color 

Q. What color programing are 
the networks planning for the fall? 

A. Of the major networks, CBS and 
NBC will have color programing. ABC 
is sticking to its all-black and white 
schedule. NBC will continue program- 
ing its Saturday, Sunday and Monday 
spectaculars in color and will present 
about four hours weekly in addition. 
Most of these four color hours will be 
shown during the day, including How- 
dy Doody, a half-hour weekday strip, 
which will be telecast in multi-chrome 
every day; Home, parts of which will 
be shown in color, and the NCAA foot- 
ball games, three or four of which are 
scheduled for color. On CBS the 90- 
minute Ford Star Jubilee shows will 
be seen in color and at least two other 
shows every week will be colorcast. 



Q. How many stations will be 
able to carry network color shows? 

A. Quite a number, sponsor's semi- 
annual poll of tv stations on color 
equipment discloses that about 62% 
of all stations can telecast network col- 
or. The figure was 54% six months 
ago and 33% a year ago. The latest 
poll (to which 45% of stations re- 
plied) also shows that another 13% 
will add the necessary equipment to 
telecast network color by the end of 
this year. Previous sponsor surveys 
indicate that about half of those who 
say they will add network color in the 
following six months do so. While it 
appears that the number of stations 
adding equipment for transmitting net- 
work color is slowing down it should 
be remembered that the latest percent- 
age figures are based on a higher total 
of stations. 



Q. How many sets will there be 
around in homes during the fall to 
receive network color shows? 

A. Accurate figures are hard to pin 
down since many of the sets produced 
are not sold to consumers but remain 
in dealers' showrooms for display and 
demonstration. Less than 20,000 color 
receivers were produced last year. In- 
dustrv estimates this year range up to 
] 50,000 color receivers produced, 
though some industry sources put the 
figure at between 75,000 and 100.000 
produced with about 50,000 ending up 
in homes. 

W bile it is no secret that color tv 



100 



SPONSOR 



baa iioi moved ahead u East u pre- 
dicted there ii ■ l<>t <>f talk about a big 
pjuh thia f.ill. It i- rignificant that 
RCA'a David Sarnoff, whose predic- 
ticm- arc uiilc-h respected, told stock 
holders in May tliat RCA earnings 
liom coloi set sales from 1 ( ).">(> on- 
u.inl will "substantiallj exceed" it> 
earnings from black and white sales. 
This does not mean that Genera] N .u- 
nolT expects t" sell as man) colot sets 
in 1 ( >.")() as 1>\\\ sets, since color Bets 
bave a higher unit price and higher 
unit profit. For example, it has been 
pointed out that sales of 30,000 color 
sets this year would be equal in doll.n 
I retail) volume to 180,000 b&w 17- 
inch Bets. 



Q. What are advertisers doing 

about color? 

A. Experimenting and learning. 

Their interests naturally are focused 
on how their products come over on 
color, which means that package color 
is getting a lot of attention. \\ hile 
there is no evidence that any major 
advertiser has or will redesign his 
package just for color tv, where re- 
design is done color tv must be kept 
in mind. 

One of the questions in package de- 
sign vis-a-vis tv is what to do during 
the transitional period when color tv 
is growing and when there will be 
substantial audiences viewing commer- 
cials in both color and b&w. The con- 
sensus is that a good color design will 
look good on black and white but not 
everyone is sure. 

The growing awareness of impulse 
purchases has affected package design 
so that the emphasis nowadays is on 
how good a package will look on a 
supermarket shelf. However, in the 
light of tv's proven ability to put over 
certain products practically single- 
handed, it is considered probable that 
as color tv becomes more important it 
may be the primary factor in many 
package designs. 



Costs 

Q. What will network tv costs 
be compared with last season? 

A. They will be higher, though the 
amount of increase will vary consider- 
ably, ranging from slight to consider- 
able. 

11 JULY 1955 



I 



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Young housewives dote on Sterling. He 
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102 



Q. What are the factors tending 
to push up prices? 

A. There are a number of them. 
They are, not necessarily in the order 
of importance, as follows: 

1. The demand among advertisers 
for prime network slots. The queue of 
clients wanting in is as long as ever. 

2. The competition among the net- 
works for big names, especially that 
between CBS TV and NBC TV for 
stars for their periodic extravaganzas. 

3. The heightened bargaining pow- 
er — partly a result of the above two 
factors — of talent agents, particularly 
the William Morris Agency and MCA. 
During the past season these two 
agents represented talent on most of 
the star-name shows being presented 
on nighttime network tv. 

4. The increasing number of tele- 
vision homes, which puts an increas- 
ing value on programs and performers 
who, on the average, reach a greater 
number of homes as time goes on. 
Greater tv circulation also increases 
time costs, of course. 

5. Since last September all three 
major networks have come out with 
new production rate cards. These are 
expected to increase costs moderately, 
though, in some cases, a new flexi- 
bility in the way the cards are set up 
permits a limited amount of cost con- 
trol. In general, however, advertisers 
prefer production quality high rather 
than risk plummeting ratings and a 
consequent rise on cos t-per- 1,000. 

6. Escalation clauses in talent con- 
tracts. Most talent contracts provide 
for automatic increases each season, 
on the theory that their services are 
worth more as a show becomes more 
familiar to tv audiences. 

7. Recent increases in union mini- 
mums. Tv writers recently received in- 
creases in certain categories. Negotia- 
tions, which were going on at spon- 
sor's presstime between the Screen 
Actors Guild and the Alliance of Tele- 
vision Film producers, will probably 
result in increased talent costs for tv 
films. SAG is seeking increased mini- 
mums and hikes in rerun pay. 



Q. Will increased costs result in 
increased costs-per-1,000 to net- 
work clients? 

A. No one can say until the ratings 
are in, but ad agencies have detected 
evidence of increasing costs-per-1,000 
this past season. To a certain extent, 
however, this apparent upward trend 




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Hooper consistently shows WJAC-TV: 

FIRST in Johnstown 

(a 2-station market) 

SECOND in Pittsburgh 

(a 3-station market) 

FIRST in Altoona 

(a 2-station market) 

Play for keeps in Southwestern Penn- 
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is due to longer network lineups, \\iih 
an increasing number <>f small-market 
stations. While adding stations to net- 
work lineups brings program costs 
per-1,000 down as the show price is 
spread over s greater number of 
homes, time ccsts-per-1,000 are almosl 
invariabl} higher in smaller markets. 



Q. Is there anything going on to 
push prices down? 
A. To a certain extent the increas- 
ing competition among film program* 

inji sources has kc|>t a rein on prices. 
However, there will be no real check to 

price rises so long as clients feel they 
are getting value from what they pay 
for. And if tv network sales are any 
indication, there are no doubts in 
sponsors' minds that tv is paying off 
for them. Most ad agenC] executives, 
while voicing conventional complaints 
about rising tv costs, view the price 
situation in the light of supply and 
demand and in terms of competition 
with other media. 

When rising tv costs push hard 
against the outer limits of ad budgets, 
advertisers have been doing one of 
two things : (a) taking money from 
other media (network radio has some- 
times felt the brunt of this policy) or 
(b) buying smaller segments of time, 
such as participations and alternate- 
week sponsorships. 

Participation opportunities are more 
common during the dav than at night. 
Both CBS TV and NBC TV offer 15- 
minute segments of personality strips. 
NBC TV also offers smaller participa- 
tions in Today and Home, while CBS 
TV has the Morning Shotv. ABC TV's 
new Mickey Mouse Club provides for 
four 15-minute segments five times a 
week. 

At night segments of less than a half 
hour have been sold on NBC TV via 
Caesar s Hour, the new Perry Como 
show, Tonight and the 15-minute pro- 
grams before 8:00 p.m. However, 
NBC TV's only nighttime half-hour 
show offering segments — The Imogene 
Coca Shoic — has been dropped. At 
night CBS TV's less-than-30-minute- 
buys are confined to the Doug Edwards 
news strip. ABC TV has been in- 
creasing its participation opportunities 
with its movie programs. The hour- 
long Disneyland is split three ways, as 
is Warner Bros. Presents. In addition, 
it is expected that ABC TV will offer 
10-minute segments in its 90-minute 
feature film show which appears to be 




fir winner.' 



from the portfolio of. 



TPA 



'Sales Builders 






11 JULY 1955 



This unique property has everything any sponsor wants. 
It's as authentic as the unstinted cooperation of the French 
Government and the Legion could make it. It reflects 
(through brilliant, quality production) all the magical 
audience appeal contained in the words. "The Foreign 
Legion" and "The Sahara"— a combination that has in- 
cubated one of the highest percentages of smash box-office 
hits in show business. 

It stars Buster Crabbe who's been in the public eye (and 
always favorably) since he was 1G. And for extra audience 
impact, it introduces his son "Cuffy" in one of the n 
appealing roles ever created. Both are available for com- 
mercials. 

And on top of all this, it comes complete with a built-in, 
powerful merchandising package for each market that's 
absolutely free. 

This is one that will go fast. Check any TPA office for 
availabilities on a sure winner. 



Television Programs of America, Inc. 

New York: 4?? Madison Avenue 

Chicago: 203 N. Wabash Avenue 

Hollywood: 5746 Sunset Boulevard 



Network tr 



set for Sunday night. 

There is a growing use of alternate- 
week sponsorships. This season, for 
the first time, it looks like there will 
be more alternate-week sponsorships 
at night than full-show sponsorships. 
When you compare the coming 
schedule with last October's, sponsor's 
Comparagraph discloses the following: 

Last year there were 29 shows with 
alternate sponsorships or 58 sponsors 
altogether. The number of full-show, 
every-week sponsorships came to 83. 
For the coming fall, so far, there will 



be 60 full sponsorships and 33 shows 
with alternate sponsorships or 66 
sponsors with alternate-week buys. 
Although there will be more buying, it 
doesn't look like the ratio will change. 
If anything, the proportion of alter- 
nate-week sponsors will probably in- 
crease by the time the fall schedule 
is all set. 

Alternate- week buying is not just to 
keep costs down. Many clients buy 
two alternate-week sponsorships rather 
than one every-week sponsorship to 
get a wider audience. 



KHOL-TV 

is Nebraska's 
Number 2 Buy! 

Picks Up Where Omaha Leaves Off! 

• Exclusive coverage of 130,000 • Half - billion dollars effective 
families in rich Central Nebraska buying income 

• Unduplicated coverage of 35% • Gives you more people at a low- 
of Nebraska's entire farm market er cost, because KHOL-TV picks 

up where Omaha leaves off 




Popul 
No. < 

Effec. 
Retai 
Food 
Sen. 
Auto 
Drug 
Farm 


UMMARY OF 
35-COUNTY 

ation 


KHOL-TVs 
MARKET* 

399,700 


f Homes 


129 l&O 


Buying Income $517,973,000 
Sales - $472,840,000 




$ 92,753,000 


Mdse. 


$ 35,548,000 




$102,749,000 
$ 12.545.000 


Income $379,762,000 

*1955 CONSUMERS MARKETS 



To take advantage of this important link in 
Midwestern telecasting, contact A. B. Mc- 
Phillamy at KHOL-TV or call your Meeker Rep- 
resentative today. 

i/M/Ni T w CHANNEL 13 
IVnUL-IY KEARNEY, NEBR. 

204,000 WATTS 

Owned and operated by Bi-States Company 

AL McPHILLAMY JACK GILBERT 

Sales Manager Station Manager 

PHONE: Axtell, Nebr. SH 3-4541 

CBS • ABC • DUMONT 

Represented nationally by MEEKER TV, Inc. 



Dayt ime tv 

Q. Will there be much change in 
daytime programing next fall? 

A. Daytime changes will be nowhere 
near as numerous as nighttime. Re- 
cently cancelled soap operas (covered 
in the programing section above) will 
be replaced for the most part by 
personality shows. Jack Paar has 
already gone into the 1:00-1:30 p.m. 
slot in place of The Inner Flame and 
Road of Life on CBS TV and It Pays 
to be Married has replaced Greatest 
Gift and Concerning Miss Marlowe. 

NBC TV is also in the midst of a 
reshuffling of its daytime schedule. 
Plans call for extending both Ding 
Dong School and Home a quarter hour 
each so that they take up the entire 
10:00 a.m. to noon period. Vacating 
these two quarter hours will be Way 
of the World (which moves to 4:00 
p.m., replacing, in turn, Hawkins Falls, 
which will be dropped) and Sheila 
Graham, which will be dropped. 

NBC TV's daytime lineup for the 
fall thus falls into five program blocks 
during the week. From 7:00 to noon 
there will be service shows (the web 
may also program from 9:00 to 10:00 
a.m. in between Today and Ding Dong 
School with a network service show). 
Personality and quiz shows take up 
the noon to 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 to 
4:00 p.m. hours; four daytime drama 
strips take up the 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. 
period and two half-hour kid shows 
make up the 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. period. 

ABC TV's new daytime effort, The 
Mickey Mouse Club, a joint Disney- 
ABC production, will be thrown in 
opposite NBC TV's children's hour. 
It will combine entertainment and 
educational elements with both new 
and old films. Its 20 quarter-hour 
segments are well on the way to being 
sold out. 

Mickey Mouse Club is one of the 
most important steps ABC has taken. 
If it pays off, the web will dominate 
the top daytime hour in terms of sets 
in use. The alacrity with which 
sponsors have bought into the show 
indicates they're sure ABC will do 
so. Not only is it felt that a name 
familiar to children is bound to attract 
young audiences but there is also the 
factor that the educational elements in 
the show may sway parents to favor 
such a program for their children. 

The new Jack Paar show represents 
practically the only daytime program 
change on CBS TV during the week. 



104 



SPONSOR 



■rk fr 



However, the program Paai left, The 

Morning Show may lit- in for BOme 

drastic overhauling. While The Morn? 

ing Show lia- not been exartly a sales 

Buccese tin- real of the CBS daytime 
schedule i> sold <>ut excepl foi a few 
participations in the Robert Q. Lewis 

,iii,| Rc>|> ( tos!>\ shows. 



Q. How does daytime network tv 
compare as a buy with night tv? 
A. Though only CBS has been con- 
sistentl] successful in selling and pro- 
graming »la\ linif, it compares very 
well with nighttime <>n a cost-per-1,000 
basis, especiall] for advertisers seeking 
to reach the housewife. 

NBC recentl) came up with figures 
showing thai on a cost-per-1,000 per 
commercial minute basis daytime tv 
was half the cost of nighttime. The 
network compared half hour nighttime 
shows with quarter-hour daytime 
shows or segments. The different- 
sized shows are comparable because 
the advertiser gets just as much com- 
mercial time in 15 minutes during the 
day (three minutes) as he does during 
a half hour at night. 

Here are the figures: 

• The average daytime quarter hour 
(excluding children's shows, participa- 
tion shows like Home and half-hour 
single sponsored programs I gets an 
average minute audience of 2,191,000 
homes ( Nielsen, November-December 
1954) while nighttime half hour shows 
reach 5,385.000 homes on the average. 
Thus, the nighttime audience is two 
and one-half times the daytime audi- 
ence. But . . . 

• The advertiser pays five times as 
much for the typical half-hour show at 
night compared with the typical 
quarter-hour during the day. The day- 
time figure is $11,600; the nighttime 
figure is $56,000. (These figures are 
based on PIB gross time rates and pro- 
gram costs are from sponsor's "Corn- 
paragraph.") So . . . 

• The cost-per-1,000 homes is $10.51 
at night and $5.28 during the day. 
while the cost-per-1,000 homes per 
commercial minute is $3.50 at night 
and sl.7(, during the day. 



lilt 



Q. What's the status of uhf at 
present? 

A. There were 106 uhf station- on 




now... 

and VO/^G&^> 

first run films on... 



Gene Autry and Roy Rogers full-length feature 

films, (the best Westerns ever made i .i re 

being shown for the first time in this .irc.i on Tom 

Chase's ever-popular "Trail Time"' program! 

"Trail Time", long the number one rated local 

daytime show in the Omaha-Iowa area, 

can't help be even better now ! 

In the last "Hooper Roundup" . . . 

"Trail Time" drew a whopping 35.0 rating 

... the opposition — 8.5! 

Let Tom Chase . . . Roy Rogers . . . and 

Gene Autry ride herd on your product and put 

it in an average ol 108,500 homes 

reached daily by "Trail Time"! 

Contact Fred Ebener. Sales Manager, or your 
nearest Blair TV man for availabilities. 




TOM chase 
Ram h Trail Time." 

another of >* I "* 1 1 > r'"\m 
0A IHl. AIR SALI SMI 




OMAHA 
Channel 6 



Max. Power • CBS • NBC 

Affiliated with Better Homes & Gardens and Successful Farming " Magazines 

A Meredith Station • Frank P. Fogorty, Vice-Pres & Gen Mgr. 



11 JULY 1955 



105 



Network tv 



the air at the end of June, of which 
three were educational stations. An- 
other 120, including 14 educational 
stations, have construction permits but 
were not yet on the air. 



Q. How have the commercial uhf 
stations been doing financially? 

A. As a group, not well. FCC finan- 
cial reports for last year show that to- 
tal revenue for 125 uhf outlets came to 
$25.4 million with a total of about 810 
million in the red, or $80,000 loss per 



station. Compared to this, 177 post- 
freeze vhf stations had revenue total- 
ing $60 million with losses totaling $4 
million, or about $22,600 per station. 
Pre-f reeze stations — all vhf — have 
been doing very well. 

Illustrating the difficulties uhf sta- 
tions have been having is the fact that 
more than 40 have gone off the air, 
some of which have kept their CP's 
and some of which have dropped them. 
All told, 113 uhf CP's have been 
turned back, showing that most of the 
operators turning back their uhf CP's 




00MMfe^ 



Frankly... 

this PULSE 
amazed even 

Us! 




More Top 
Shows Than 
Ever Before 

Bigger Lead 
In Over-All 
Popularity 



KMTV has 13 of the top 
15 weekly shows ... 8 of 
the top 10 multi-weekly 
shows . . . favorite local- 
ly-produced shows 

KMTV has a greater share 
of audience in 8 of the 9 
Pulse weekly time classi- 
fications 



This latest survey, based on 1600 interviews, covers Omaha, Lin- 
coln, and the seven Nebraska and Iowa counties that make up the heart 
of a KMTV market area of a million-and-a-half people with more than 
two billion dollars to spend. 

So take a look at the latest Pulse and a KMTV rate card and you'll 
agree — You will reach more people ... at a lower cost . . in this big 



market on KMTV 



OMAHA's FAVORITE TV STATION. 



Contact KMTV or your Petry man to- 
day for more information about some of 
KMTV's choice availabilities. 

*Puhe, May 1-7, 1955 

Smart Advertisers All Agree: 
The Place to be is Channel 3 



TELEVISION CENTER 

Mmrw 



CHANNEL 3 • OMAHA 

MAY BROADCASTING CO. 

Represented by Edward Petry Co., Inc. 



CBS-TV 
ABC-TV 




KANSAS 



KMTV MARKET DATA* 

Population 1 ,500,850 

TV Homes 308,000 

Retail Sales $1,712,656,500 

Buying Income S2.229.121 ,000 

"SM-SRDS Estimates 



have given up the ghost without even 
going on the air. (There have been 
30 vhf deletions). These deleted uhf 
CP's are in addition to those totaled in 
the question above. Thus, 322 uhf 
CP's have been granted by the FCC, 
of which more than a third have been 
turned back. 

The picture is not all bad. Some 
uhf stations are in healthv financial 
condition or will be. The successful 
ones are those which went on the air 
in virgin tv markets or in markets 
where there was little or no vhf com- 
petition. 

However, the uhf picture has not 
improved much since a year ago. 
While there is less public talk about 
the uhf problem, there has been in- 
creasing activity in Washington among 
those seeking a solution. 



Q. Is there any solution to the 
uhf problem? 

A. It is pretty generally agreed that 
where uhf and vhf stations exist in the 
same market the uhf stations are at a 
disadvantage. This is because, with 
the present state of uhf technology, the 
uhf signal, under comparable condi- 
tions, does not go out as far as the 
vhf signal and thus is not as desirable 
as a network affiliate. The problem of 
getting viewers to convert vhf receiv- 
ers to pick up uhf signals also is still 
serious in some markets, especially in 
those markets where two or more vhf 
stations have satisfied the audiences' 
programing needs. 

The general tack being taken in 
Washington is "selective de-intermix- 
ture,"' that is re-allocating channels so 
that more vhf-uhf markets are made 
all-vhf or all-uhf, thus putting com- 
peting stations on an equal footing. 
The selective part of it comes into the 
picture because there is no desire for 
a radical change, such as moving all 
commercial tv into the uhf spectrum. 
The FCC wants to de-intermix with- 
out causing too much hardship on tv 
set owners or broadcasting interests. 

Q. What's actually being done to 
ease the uhf problem? 

A. The FCC has started holding 
hearings on de-intermixture in spe- 
cific markets. The first of these hear- 
ings were held on 27-28 June. Five 
markets were covered: Peoria, Evans- 
ville, Madison, Hartford, Albany. 

On the Congressional side, the first 
of a series of ad hoc committees (that 



106 



SPONSOR 



N . in hi /. It 



it, temporal*) committees set up t » > 
solve one particular problem I baa 
been set up !>\ the Senate ( lommerce 
Committee, which is investigating the 
broadcasting industry. TTiese commit- 
tees \vill be made up "I experts out- 
side of Congress. He iii-t ad hoc 
committee will re-evaluate the current 
allocation plan t" see what can be done 
about ulil. 



Video l;ipt k 

Q. How long will it be before 
video tape is in actual commercial 
use? 

A. First commercial use <>f \ideo 
tape nut \ be an actuality. by the com- 
ing spring. Tin- two groups working 
on video tape for broadcasting use 
(aside from work being done for the 
armed forces) — RCA and Bing Crosb] 
Enterprises — both report they have 
licked all the major technical prob- 
lems. (For more details on this sub- 
ject, see "Video Tape: programing 
revolution on the horizon," sponsor, 
21 March 1955.) 



Q. Will color video tape be avail- 
able as soon as black and white? 

A. ^ es. The big technical push to 
perfect magnetic video tape is being 
made with color in mind. When RCA 
first unveiled its video tape a year and 
a half ago, it stressed color, not black 
and white. 



Q. What's being done at present 
in perfecting video tape? 

A. RCA has been field testing its re- 
corder and play-back unit in New 
York. A short time ago, NBC sent out 
via closed-circuit to St. Paul (in ob- 
servance of the opening of a new lab 
bj Minnesota Mining and Manufac- 
turing, a maker of raw tape stock) a 
color show recorded in New York. 
That is, the signal was sent from a 
tape recording that had previously 
been made. NBC also regularly re- 
cords on tape in New York programs 
sent out from Hollywood over regular 
network lines in both color and black 
and white. 

BCE has already delivered one of 
its tape recording units to Westing- 
house and expects a $500,000 order 
shortly. It is currently redesigning it- 
unit to eliminate minor bugs. 

11 JULY 1955 



A GEOGRAPHY LESSON 



One of a Series 




are BALTIMORE 
and NORFOLK in 
WASHINGTON 
STATE? 




In case you suspect we've become rusty in our geography, Wt li.i-.tfn to MJ we 

are aware that Baltimore and Norfolk are n<>i In Washington State W< re 
merely pointing out that the sum of the populations of these twe eastern cities 

is less than the population served l»y KIN I -IV in its "A" < ontour. 

Within the "V contour boundaries of KIN I l\ then ere more than 1. '100,000 
able-to-buy people . . . almost half the population of Washington Mate. \nd. 
in addition, KTNT-TVs INI I.I I N< | \I!I.\ extends throughout Western Wash- 
ington and into Canada to the north and into parts of Oregon to the south. 



The Puget Sound area . . . 
the KTNT-TV area . . . 
has a Per Capita Income 
greater than the U.S. 
national average. 



-fifS) 



CANADA 




Of all TV stations 
>n the fabulous 
Pucct Sound area. 
only KTNT-TV 
covers ill 5* cities 
in its A contour 
"Swort't. Tocomo, 

Frert'f. Br «• - 

ion, O'rmpio 



In Washington State. Advertise Where the PEOPLE are . Buy KTNT-TV. 



kQTDtvs 



CHANNEL ELEVEN 




316,000 WATTS 



Antenna Height 
1000 FT. ABOVE SEA LEVEL 



CBS Television for Pugct Sound 



Represented Nationally by Weed Television 

KTNT-TV, TACOMA 5 I'ON 



'The Word Gets Around. ..Buy Puget Sound' 



107 



Network tt 




JWk 



Q. What will video tape be used 
for first? 

A. It will be used in place of kines. 
Il is understood that RCA's technical 
target for next spring is to perfect 
video tape to the extent that it will be 
as good as, if not better than, both 
color and b&w kines. 



Q. What is the advantage of tape 
over kines? 

A. Since tape can be recorded and 
played back almost instantaneously, 



there is no time problem in rebroad- 
casting a live show. For example, a 
live show produced in New York can 
be shown via a "hot" (rapid develop- 
ing of film) kine on the Pacific Coast 
three hours later, or the same local 
time. But faster development is not 
possible, so that a live 9:00 p.m. show 
in New York cannot be shown in Chi- 
cago at the same local time because a 
kine cannot be developed fast enough. 
When video tape is perfected for re- 
placing kines, it will be possible to 
have a live tv show on at the same 



«% j-iti-a-r VERIFIED FACTS 

2 GREAT ABOUT A TREMENDOUS 

NETWORKS 'CAPTIVE AUDIENCE 

SERVING 

1 GREAT 
MARKET 

WIN-T your station for complete 
coverage of the thriving 1 8-county 

TRI-STATE MARKET SUR- 
ROUNDING FORT WAYNE, 

INDIANA. Check these billion 
dollar market facts and figures: 



• POPULATION 722,500 

• HOUSEHOLDS 228,600 

• CONSUMER SPENDABLE 

INCOME $1,177,771,000 

• TOTAL RETAIL SALES 

$768,150,000 



WIN-T 

CBS and ABC for FORT WAYNE 
and the Tri State area of In 
diana, Ohio and Michigan. 

Nationally repreienfee* by 

H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



Here's What "Pulse" Discovered 
About Television Viewing in 
WKBT's Rich Market in 
Southwestern Wisconsin, 
Southeastern Minnesota and 
Northeastern Iowa: 



l. 



i 



ALREADY 100,000 TV HOMES 
OUT OF THE 176,873 TOTAL 
FAMILIES IN THE WKBT 
COVERAGE AREA! 



I 



2. 73.5% OF THESE TELEVISION 

FAMILIES VIEW WKBT VIRTUALLY 
EVERY DAY! (The Second Most-Viewed 
Station in Our Area Has 26.4% of the TV 
Families as Regular Viewers.) 

For Complete Details on the Reception Survey Conducted 

for WKBT by "Pulse" — Contact Bob Morrison, 

WKBT Sales Manager, or Your Nearest Raymer Office 



NBC • CBS • ABC • Du Mont 

WKBT 



Channel o 



141 So. 6th St. 



LA CROSSE, WIS. 



108 



SPONSOR 



N > In in I. Ii 



[oca] time in all zones, thua 
avoiding man) traffic complications 
and slotting problems which now both- 
n the networks. 

\ ideo tape w ill also remove man) 
of the headaches of daylight saving 
tunc Some oi the top live shows are 
shown iii ilit- midwest during the earl) 
evening. Tnis depresses the ratings, 
especiall) during the summer when 
earl) evening sets-in-use are compara- 

ti\t-l\ low. 

Furthermore, k i m- films 'I" nol i om- 
pare with regular film in quality as a 
rule. While the first commercial video 
tapes ma) be no better than kine film, 
the possibilities for improving tape 
through further research are much 
greater than lor kinea. 



Q. Why are people so excited 
over tape? 

A. Potentially, tape can be perfect- 
ed bo that it comes on the home screen 
with the same fidelity as a live show. 
Because the "information" recorded on 
tape is electronic, it is essentially the 
same information that is transmitted 
when a live performance is picked up 
h\ an elecronic tv camera. With reg- 
ular film— and even more so with kine 
film there i- an inevitahle loss in 
fidelit) even before the image is picked 
up electronically. 

Possibly more important than this is 
the fact that \ideo tape permits the 
program to be monitored as it is being 
recorded. This means that a director 
can see what the show will look like 
on the home screen and correct Haws 
as he goes along during rehearsal. He 
can also switch from one tv camera to 
another without stopping the action as 
he watches the monitor and the result 
will be continuous tape footage with a 
\ariety of camera angles and without 
am splicing or editing problems. All 
this involves a saving of time and. 
hence, mone) . 

The convenience of monitoring a 
-how while shooting it has led to the 
development of combination film and 
video cameras, notably the I)u Mont 
Electronicam. This system works to- 
ward the same end as video tape, ex- 
cept that the result is film. The Elec- 
tronicam is a camera which picks up 
an image like an) tv camera. The light 
beam coming through the camera lens 
is then split into two. One part can be 
transmitted like any tv signal. The 
other exposes film. 

The primary purpose of Electroni- 



i .mi i- not to -'iid i. hi i show h\ e 
while it i- being re< orded on film .it 
ili.- -.inn- inn.- Dm Mont i- using the 
device to shoot him shows, wln<li 
would then be sent out to stations like 
am syndicated -how. I hi- electron i< 
pari "i I Iii i ronicam is foi the pui pose 
ol monitoi ing, m iih ii- e< onora) , 

\ -iniil.n i .iini-i.i has been devel- 
oped 1>\ M< i adden Pi odm tions, the 
Burns S \ll'-n produi Ing unit \ third 
t\ -film camera i ombines a film cam- 
era with a t\ camera each with its 
nw n lens Bide b) ride bul < orrei ted 
for parallax bo thai the i\ i amera pi< k- 



ind -how i on 
identii al 

i ii film lb- | be put] 

enable i dire* i"i i" speed up ahool 

I inall) . there i- the In.'li del 
kine. I In- has been show i 
. I. - |.\ .i In iii-h In in Ii pur- 
pose i- thai "i the dei i pU 

above V tv < amei • pi< kg up the in 
and permits monitoring. Hoi 
high-qualit) film kim- i- made h\ the 
use of a high-definition k tube 

whii Ii Ii i- about SO' i more lines I 
the I S. standard and thus reaulti 
film of greatei i lai it) 



CHICAGO'S TOP TELEVISION 
STATION-WGN-TV ? CHANNEL 9 

/ Chicago Television's Top Morning Children's Pro- 

Y gram — "Romper Room" 

/ Chicago Television's Top Teenage Program — "Band- 

Y stand Matinee" 

/ Chicago Television's Highest Rated Feature Film 
y Programs 

/Exclusive Telecasts of All Cubs and White Sox Games 



,000th Telecast in May) 



y nij 

V 7 



Highest Rated Half Hour Film Programs on Week- 
ght TV 



Only Chicago Station Placing in Billboard's National 
Promotion Competition 



WCN-TV— THE TOP STATION FOR YOUR ADVERTISING 
IN CHICAGO! ! 



441 N. Michigan Avenue 

Chicago 1 1 

Illinois 



WGN-TV 

Chicago <) 



For your best radio buy in Chicago, it's WGN— reaching more people 
than any other Chicago advertising medium. 



11 JULY 1955 



109 



Network tv 



The Best Buy in 
Wichita's Big Ten- 
County Market 





: ARB 

JANUARY 

1955 



KEDD Captures 

1 1 1 

Quarter-Hour Firsts*! 

From 4 p.m. to sign-off KEDD is FIRST in 
audience preference for 52.6% of ALL 
quarter-hour segments compared to 31.7% 
for Station "B" and 15.6% for Station n C"! 

With Over SO Blue-Chip NBC 
Programs And Wichita's Top- 
Rated Local Shows Every Week! 



SEE YOUR PETRY MAN TODAY! 



NBC 



KEDD 

WICHITA, KANSAS 



Channel 

mm 




is for "Brains" 
is for "Work" 



That's what counts most at "B & W" . . . and nothing does more to 
bring about a most successful client-agency union. 

"Brains" and "Work" . . . and "Experience." We have that, too. 
Each of us has had more than 30 years in agency work, and in related 
advertising and selling. Yet our greatest successes have been in the 
newest advertising medium . . . Television. 

We'd like to tell you more about our experience . . . and how we 
have helped advertisers solve special problems "down South," as 
well as elsewhere. May we? 



Brinckerhoff dC Williams Agency 

928 Gov. Nicholls St., 
New Orleans 16, La. 
Phone CAnal 6219 



E. V. BRINCKERHOFF 



AUBR 



'flfcW. 
EY WILLIAMS «*L» 




110 



Network competition 

Q. What's happening to network 
competition? 

A. It's increasing in one area, de- 
creasing in another. ABC is more 
firmly ensconced as a third "major" 
network, while Du Mont, unless there 
is some sudden change in plans has 
pulled itself out of the simultaneous 
networking picture. 



Q. In what direction is Du Mont 
aiming? 

A. Du Mont is placing heavy bets 
on its Electronicam (see explanation 
on workings of Electronicam in "Video 
tape" section). It is out to convince 
what few advertisers it has and what- 
ever new ones it can get that not only 
is the Electronicam an economical way 
of shooting film shows (aside from 
the residual values of film) but that 
Du Mont can clear time for these 
shows. Du Mont, in other words, is 
aiming at becoming a film network, 
thus putting itself in a new category 
somewhere in between live networks 
and syndicators. Du Mont is also turn- 
ing itself into a film production or- 
ganization, will turn out film commer- 
cials, industrial films and so forth. 



Q. How far has ABC come since 
the merger with United Para- 
mount Theatres? 

A. There is no disagreement about 
the fact that since the merger in Feb- 
ruary 1953 the programing and sales 
picture have improved considerably. 
In January 1953, one month before 
the merger, of the 49 half-hours pro- 
gramed by the network at night, 11 
were sold and 38 unsold. Two vears 
later the situation was reversed, with 
only 11 half hours unsold. So far this 
season, 14 half hours and two alternate 
sponsorships remain unsold (exclud- 
ing co-op shows) with two months of 
the selling season left. 

PIB gross billings figures also illus- 
trate the sales trend. In 1953 ABC 
billings were 15% above the previous 
year compared with 26% for all net- 
works. Last year ABC billings were 
up 64% over the previous year while 
the increase for all networks was 41%. 



Q. How has ABC built up its pro- 
graming? 

A. By April of this year the new 

SPONSOR 






N. I, 



•I. I, 



HOW ABOUT THAT 
JOE FLOYD TRIANGLE? 




Joe's putting a whole new market 
on the tv map . . . 78,000 single- 
station homes, massed in the great 
Aberdeen - Watertown - Huron tri- 
angle, with transmitter strategical- 
ly located at Florence, South 
Dakota. You can reach this great 
new market only through the joe 
Floyd-operated KDLO-TV (CHAN- 
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Sioux Falls. 




78% 

Coverage of South Dakota 
— Plus Minnesota and Iowa 




JOE FLOYD, President 

NBC (TV) PRIMARY 
CBS • ABC • DuMONT 

represented by 
H-R TELEVISION 



\ BC had invested m"i>- than $70 mil- 
lion in |>i ogi . i r 1 1 i 1 1 u* and talent i om- 
mitments. 1 1. ill "I tin- li u [one foi 
the W ill I liane) Entei pi iset I he net- 
work has built its programing in .ill 
the basic waj i possible: I 1 » outi 
,n quisition of pi h om othei 

networks oi producers, (2) attract 
advertising i ontrolled programs and 
(3) developing its own packages. Mm- 
importance "I shows produced l>\ mo- 
tion picture studios might I"- i on- 
sidered, because oi their importance, 

as ,i li'intli method. 



Q. What programs has ABC 
added to its roster? 
A. Before the mergei \l'.< had .i 
bask structure of -even shows, [these 
were Vame's the Same, Lone Rat 
StU F.ruin, Super Circus, You [iked 
for It, Walter IV inched and I il ven- 
tures of Ozzie and Harriet. 

For its first season alter the merger, 
VBC added: Danny Thomas Show, 
Ray Bolger Show, Cavalcade of 4mer- 
ica, U. S. Steel Hour, The Tv Hour. 
Pepsi Cola Playhouse, Ureal the Bank 
and John Daly and the News. 

This past season, the new shows 
mounted. Here's the list: Disneyland, 
Treasury Men in Action, Masquerade 
Party, Tv Reader's Digest, NC 1 1 
Football, Dollar a Second, Monday 
Night Boxing, 20 Questions, Rin-T in- 
Tin, Stork Club, Who Said That, Star 
Tonight, The Vise, Kuhla, Fran and 
Ollie. Stop the Music and Voice of 
Firestone. 



Q. What programs is ABC add- 
ing for the coming season? 
A. With the selling season not yel 
open and 11 hours not yet programed, 
-In 'us added so far include: Chance of 
a Lifetime, Warner Bros. Presents. 
Wyatt F.arp. Du Pont Theatre. MG 1/ 
Parade, Penny to a Million (which 
started last this past season), Bishop 
Sheen, Down You Go and Wednesday 
Night Fights. 

In addition. ABC is planning .i 90- 
minute feature film show on Sunday, 
is deciding betweeen Jangle Jim and 
Sheena. Queen of the Jungle for earl) 

Monday evening, has to pick a show 
title for Ciba Pharmaceutic al. and. 
mo>t important of all. has to program 
Saturday night, which is wide open. 

\- mentioned in a previous section, 

ABC has an hour drama in mind for 
Satunla\ . * * * 



X10 II 



You c.in h.ivc Song-ads, 
America's foremost producers 
of filmed musical and radio 
jingle commercials work for you! 
For as little as 



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A complete AUDITION 
package ready for 
CLIENT SUBMISSION. 

You need send us only: — 

1. Purchase order for $150. 
(So we have something to 
work with) 

2. Tear sheets and scripts 
about product. (So we know 
something about it) 

3. Five points about prod- 
uct, in order of their impor- 
tance. (So we know where to 
put emphasis) 

4. Your client's philosophy 
about account. (So we get the 

feci of it) 

5. Whether for television 
and/or radio and lengths of 
commercials wanted. (So we 
can tailor-make your com- 
mercial to fit your plans) 

n 



client acceptance of your idea 

with a complete AUDITION PRES 

ENTATION. 

This package will be created 

especially so your consumers 

hum, sing and talk about YOUR 

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AND BUY YOUR PRODUCT. 

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KODUCTION 



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CALIFOMA . . . HOIIy»ood 5-61 ■ 1 



11 JULY 1955 



11 



NEW 



1330 Feet above 
TOWER dL Average Terrain 



SliNEW POWER 

NUW! 100,000 WATTS 



for 

Oklahoma 

sales 




the eyes of Oklahoma 



KV 



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TV 



FOR CURRENT AVAILABILITIES CALL THE OFFICES OF BLAIR 



112 



SPONSOR 






■■■-. 



1955 F III. FACTS l: W S SEi II<>\ 




\television 





MORE THAN 36 MILLION TV SETS 
ENTERTAIN AND SELL IN U.S. TV HOUSEHOLDS 

Page Mumbrr 

Q. Hon arc \\ homes distributed in I .S.? 1 

Q. Where are tv sets located? 2 

Q. How does viewing wir\ with time of day? 3 

Q. How much "out-of-home' 1 viewing i» there? 4 

Q. Does tv audience composition change? 5 

Q. What effect <loe* h have on new markets? 7 

Q. What are network production cost averages? 9 

Q. Ho* much monej was spenl in tv? 10 



Reprint* trill he available at .'{Or each. Otiatifitif price* on request. 
Address Sponsor Serrire*. Inc., 10 E. IHth St.. \ew York 17. V *. 



1. How many tv sets are there in the U.S. today? 



SOURCE: NBC TV estimate 



More than 900% increase 




2. How are tv homes distributed by major U.S. areas? 






SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen Co., May 1955 



ALL RADIO 

MOM l - 

INCLUDING 

THOSE WITH 

TELEVISION' 



% OF RADIO - 
HOMES HAV- 
ING TV 
RECEIVERS" 



Northeast 

12,575,000 



East Central 



8,167,000 



West Central 



9,283,000 




South 



11,419,000 



Pacific 

6,177,000 



1 


■ 




64.8% 


47.0% 



TELEVISION { 
HOMES J 



11,034,000 



5,970,000 



5,613,000 



5,370,000 4,013,000 



TY BASICS 



page 1 



3. How many tv sets were produced and sold in '53 and '54? 



SOURCE: RETMA figures for factory production, retail 



YEAH 


PRODI < IH>\ 


Id 1 Ml - \l 1 B 


i <>:>:* 


7,215,827 


6370,571 


1954 


7,346,715 


7317,034 



4. Where are tv sets located in U.S. homes today? 



SOURCE: "National Survey of Radio, and Television 
Sets," May 1954 by Alfred Politz for ARF 



Tv is "living room" medium 

Mora than eight out of tan home tv sets 
ara located in the living room, far mora 
than all other home locations combined. 
This location pattern, found by Polirz in 
'54 study for Advertising Research Foun- 
dation, helps explain why tv has often 
scattered radio into non-living-room loca- 
tions, and why tv sat manufacturers are 
now busy establishing "second-set" market. 



« Dining 
Room 



3.2% 



Den 
4.8% 



Living Room 
85.3% 



fT 


P^ 


i. I 


Lj Other 
rt 3.3% _ 




i 




— ■ Bedroom 
3.4% 




1 


1 


m 




1 



For comparable chart of radio set location see page 2 of Radio Basi< s. 



5. How many tv homes today are multi-set tv households? 

SOURCE: NBC TV estimate for June 1955 



ONE-SET HOMES: 9E.V, 




IWO-M I IIOMr* : r.. 



»: .). . , 




Although two-thirds of U.S. radio households own two or more ra- 
dios (see "Radio Basics"), most television families own just one 
tv receiver. However, estimates by NBC TV researchers of number 
of tv sets and tv homes in U.S. indicates small but noticeable 



trend t'> multi-eel h ownership. Other Bgnrea show that multi- 
set tv families are DOR likely t" be in large urban area* long 
served by tv: AdWlesl checkup in New York in '54 showed 
families owning two or more. In newest tv ar>a«, figure is small. 



TY BASICS 



page 2 



1. How does tv viewing level vary with the time of day? 

SOURCE: Nielsen Television Index, March 1955 









21.248 






Total U.S. homes using tv by hours of day 




20,650 










18,426 






Number of homes using tv at any hour of the day or night 
rose steadily between 1954 and 1955, Nielsen chart below 
shows. One major reason: a steady growth in the total 
number of tv homes. Numbers in white sections of bar 
show 1955 levels; in grey sections, 1954. Tv is watched 
all day long, but it really hits its big stride at night, 
where level may be seven to 10 times higher than mornings. 








I7,36ll 

15,346 


10,690 








1 






13,081 


13,221 








10,591 


10,378 


9,992 










■ 

6.321 


8,584 






7,570 










6,507 


mum 

^^* 5,437 
5,272 








5,744 ] 




Homes rea 


ched (000) 




B 

3,919 


5,217 
4,499 






1 
2,843 


Ql 83 


|EZ2 

718 ! 





















6 am 7 8 



10 11 noon 1 



8 9 10 11 mid 



2. How does tv and radio usage compare in tv homes? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, NTI and NRI, April 1954 through March 1955 



TV 

HOURS 

PER 

DAY 



RADIO 

HOURS 

PER 

DAY 



Time tv homes spend with tv and radio 



April 
1954 



is! i.8i I . I ,.» '■" "TrT '•" '- 86 



^■B 


■ 




1.93 


1.81 


1.69 



May 



June July 



Aug. 



Sept. Oct. 



Nov. Dec. 



Jan. 
1955 



4.71 4.67 3.98 3.68 3.90 4.38 4.61 5.40 5.46 5.81 5.89 5.25 



Feb. 



March 
1955 



TV 8 A S I C, S [ Page 3 



TO SELL 
ST. LOUIS 



. . . TELL your sales story tit the people u ho live 
in the 800,000 television homes uho tune in 
regularly to St. Louis' FIRST television station 
. . . KSD-TV . . . the \li( television network 
affiliate in the nation's MM II LARGE SI 
MARKET, To sell St. Louis more effectively . . . 
more economically . . . 



SELL ON 



K S D-T V 



The St. Louis Post-Dispatch Television Station 
100.000 Watts on I III Channel 1 




Motional tdti-rti^ing Rcpn'tmtatu .-. 



SPOT SALES 



11 JULY 1955 117 



3. How widespread is out-of-home television viewing? 



SOURCE: -The Kansas Radio-Tv Audience, 195-1" by Dr. F. L. Whan 



14% of family members see tv away from home 



(Percentages based on replies 


from 6, 887 families reached by interview) 




All 


Farm 


Village 


Urban 




Families 


Families 


Families 


Families 


Per Cent Answering Questions: 










Yes 


14. 3% 


10. 9% 


13.8% 


17.0% 


No, none do 


82. 5 


84.7 


82.3 


81.0 


I don't know 


3. 2 


4.4 


3.9 


2.0 




100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



Out-of-home tv viewing is not by any means as widespread 
as out-of-home radio listening. But, chart above, part of 
18th annual study of Kansas broadcast audience made for 
WIBW. Topeka. shows that there is a certain amount of 



regular away-from-home viewing. Survey was a care- 
fully controlled operation, done with personal interviews 
in large cross-section sample of town-and-country view- 
ers. Non-home viewing is highest in major urban areas. 



4. Where does out-of-home tv viewing take place? 



SOURCE: "The Kansas Radio-Tv Audience, 1954" by Dr. F. L. Whan 



Nearly all of it is in someone else's home 



(Replies From 985 families reporting outside use of TV used in analysis) 





All 


Farm 


Village 


Urban 




Families 


Families 


Families 


Families 


Per Cent Reporting Seeing 










Television Regularly at: 










A neighbor's home 


30.2% 


37. 3% 


41. 1 


22. 5% 


Some other friend's home 


24.0 


13.7 


19. 1 


30.6 


A relative's home 


34.4 


37.7 


30.3 


34. 5 


At some other town 


3.2 


5.9 


1. 1 


2.9 


At business places 


4.4 


4.4 


5.3 


4.0 


At "the club" 


1.3 


- 


0.5 


2.2 


At school 


0.4 


0. 5 


0.5 


0.2 


All other places 










combined 


2. 1 


0. 5 


2. 1 


3. 1 




100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



Chart above gives a good idea of where out-of-home view- 
ing is done. In the strictly rural areas, most of it takes 
place at the home of a neighbor or relative, during a 
visit. In the urban areas, the pattern is similar, although 
"relatives'" seem to have an edge over "neighbors," un- 
like the rural pattern. 

Other out-of-home locations are largely in the "margin- 
al" categorv. One possible influencing factor in this study: 



Kansas does not have bars & grills, although as chart in- 
dicates, it does have private clubs. In urban areas in the 
East, taverns would probablv claim a share of the tv 
audience, since there's hardly a saloon that doesn t have 
its television set going at all hours. 

In any event, due to the tremendous penetration of tv in 
U.S. homes and the relative immobility of tv receivers the 
patterns above, bars or no bars, are largely true of the I .S. 



TV BASICS 



page 4 



stacki 



nic 




WNBQ famous "Chicago School" "I telcvi »n ' 
bright new honoi pupil on iu ro u i ■ I >• r.< >\\ ■ K \N 
WITH EDDIE DOUCETT1 ; ow. 

Every weekday > |» m., th< se thn I 

favorites turn the pages of the ii rv Maga/iix f the Aii 
Women are making ■ pit isani dail) habii ol Bob t. 
interviews with fascinating people, Eddii D 

<1m strations, and musical features b) ili< \n Van Damme 

Quintet and llicchio's orch< tra. 

the new show is stacking up nicelyl And, backed 
l>\ .hi active promotion and merchandising service, it's i 

• n il>. 1 1 ki 1 1 on i i .in i i ol making sun l"i adv< rtis< i thai 

THE PAY-OFF IS AT THE POINT OF SALE! 

A few weeks aftei its premiere, BOB 8 k \. WITH 
EDDIE DOUCETTE invited its viewers to end in th< 
names, addresses and telephone numbers, to qualify foi 
attractive prizes. Foi foui weeks running, the mail itad 
up .11 the rate "l 2300 pie< es a week. A grand total ol 10 
pieces "I mail— and the show's just getting going! 

Foi sin i in» audiences to action, there's nothing lil 
"Chicago School" television program on WNBQ That's 
how things stack up in the Midwesi 



I I I I A [SION IN 
CHICAGO 

a letvirt cf 
rtprrscnttd by NBC SPOT SALES 




5. How does tv audience composition vary during the week? 



SOURCE: American Research Bureau, Fall 1954 



MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 



A. 



TIME SEGMENT 



MEN 



SIGN-ON TO NOON 15% 

NOON TO 6 PM 12% 

6 PM TO SIGN-OFF 34% 



WOMEN 

49% 

55% 

45% 



KIDS (UNDER 16) VIEWERS-PER-SET 



36% 
33% 
21% 



1.8 



1.8 



2.5 



SATURDAY 



j^. 



TIME SEGMENT 



MEN 



SIGN-ON TO NOON 13% 

NOON TO 6 PM 46% 

6 PM TO SIGN-OFF 34% 



SUNDAY 



WOMEN 

13% 

25% 
38% 



KIDS (CINDER 16) V1EWERS-PER-SET 



74% 
29% 
38% 



2.3 



2.3 



2.7 



_A_ 



TIME SEGMENT 



MEN 



NOON TO 6 PM 42% 

6 PM TO SIGN-OFF 33% 



WOMEN 

32% 
39% 



KIDS (UNDER 16) MEWERS-PER-SET 



26% 
18% 



2.4 



2.4 



In chart above, audience composition and viewers-per-set should by v-p-s, then percentage of men-women-kids figured. There's a 

be used together. ARB home audience figure should be multiplied higher percentage of women in daytime, but more viewing at night 



6. How does tv home viewing vary month-by-month? 

SOURCE: Nielsen Television Index, April 1954-April 1955 







TV BASICS 



page 5 




Agency people agree that the longest distance 
in the world is between the retailers' shelves and 
the customers' shopping basket, particularly when 
it comes to introducing a new product on the 
market . . . But that is not so in Erie, Penna., the 
shopping center of Northwestern Pennsylvania, 
Western New York and Eastern Ohio where 
WICU's fabulous growth as an advertising medium 
has been built on one successful test market 
campaign after another. 

WICU ranks 1 1th in the nation among cities of 



all sizes, and second in the nation, first in the 
Middle Atlantic States and first in Pennsylvania 
as a Test Market, for population group. 

. . . SALES MANAGEMENT (1955 Te»t Market Study) 

WICU serves a television market of 235,300 
families with retail sales of $904,928,000 and 
an effective buying income of $1,345,555,000 
— and a standard metropolitan area of 68,600 
families with retail sales of $303,452,000 and 
an effective buying income of $380,357,000. 

. . . TELEVISION MAGAZINE (1955 Doto BooM 




F7^Co?TO 



ERIE. PA. 



• AOIO 

tv 

NEWSPAPEB 



CHANNEL 12 



fu<J&4 inc. 



mo*| 0"'C1 — WO lOWAtO lAMl UDO TOUOO 0«'0 WAi»tM0*O* 0"'CI tirr M*no*Ai Mill kOO 



NBC 



ABC 



ERIE'S FAVORITE RADIO STATION — WIKK • ABC • NBC 



WICU — Erie, Pa. 
Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

WIKK-AM — Erie, Pa. 
Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

WTOD— Toledo, Ohio 
Forjoe 



WHOO— Orlando, Florida 
Forjoe 

W MAC-TV— Matiillon, Ohio 
Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

The Erie Dispatch — Erie. Pa. 
Reynoldi-Fitzgerald 



7. How do tv families and non-tv families compare in size? 



SOURCE: "Television's Daytime Profile," NBC TV Research Dept. 



Family size and composition of tv homes, daytime homes 



One 6r two persons '. . 

Three persons 

Four persons ..... 

Five or more persons 

ALL HOMES . . 

Number of Persons Per 100 Homes: 

MaleAdults 

Female Adults 

Chi Idren ." 

TOTAL PERSONS ....... 













Total 


TV 


Non-TV 


Day time 


Day t i me 


Homes 


Homes 


Homes 


Homes 


Homes 


(2.87 1 ) 


( 1 .673) 


(1,1 98 ) 


I 1 ,099) 


( 1 .676) 


35. 7% 


29.3% 


44. 1-% 


26 . 2% 


41 .6% 


20.4 


22.0 


18.2 


22.3 


19.3 


20.9 


24.8 


15.9 


25.7 


17.8 


23.0 


23.9 


21 .8 


• 25.8 
100.0% 


21 .3 


100.0% 


100.0% 


100.0% 


100.0% 


102 


108 


93 


110 


98 


1 IB 


120 


1 15 


1 16 


1 18 


127 


132 


120 


145 


1 16 



347 



360 



328 



37 1 



332 



8. How does annual income of tv families, non-tv compare? 

SOURCE: "Television's Daytime Profile," NBC TV Research Dept. 

Tv family's income is 48% larger than non-tv home 













Non- 




Total 


TV 


Non-TV 


Daytime 


Day time 




Homes 


Homes 


Homes 


Homes 


Homes 




( 2 , 87 1 ) 


( 1 ,673) 


( 1 , 1 98 ) 


( 1 , 099 ) 


( 1 , 676 ) 




17.4% 


7.7% 


30.3% 


8.6% 


22.0% 


$2,000 - $2,999 . . 


17.0 


12.7 


22.7 


13.5 


18.6 


$3,000 - $4,999 . 


36.4 


40.2 


31.3 


42.2 


33.5 


$5,000 - $6,999 . 


...... 16.7 


22.9 


8.4 


22.6 


13.5 


$7,000 and over 


...... 12.5 


16.5 


7.3 


13. 1 


12.4. 


ALL HOMES 


...... 100.0% 


100.0% 


100.0% 


100.0% 


100.0% 




$4,250 


$4,940 


$3,330 


$4,710 


$4,020 



9. When do tv families shop for household, grocery products? 



SOURCE: "Television's Daytime Profile," NBC TV Research Dept. 



Days of the week on which shopping was done by tv homes 













Non- 




Total 


TV 


Non-TV 


Daytime 


Day time 




Homes 


Homes 


Homes 


Homes 


Homes 




( 2 , 87 1 ) 


I I .673) 


1 1 , 198) 


( 1 , 099 ) 


( 1,6761 


Made Any Shopping Trips On. . . 












Monday .,.♦,, 


46.4% 


50.8% 


40.6% 


51.4% 


43.7% 


Tuesday 


47.5 


50.5 . 


43.3 


50.6 


45.6 


Wednesday 


48.5 


52.6 


43. 1 


52.8 


46.3 


Thursday 


47.9 


51.8 


42.7 


. 51.1 


46. 1 


Friday . . '. 


56.6 


62.4 


48.7 


62. 1 


53.4 


Saturday 


67.9 


66.5 


69.8 


67.6 


68.2 


Sunday . • 


15. 1 


18.4 


10.6 


17.2 


13.7 



TV BASICS 



page 6 



EVEN WE WERE SURPRISED! 




serving 350,000 

television homes 

in Central California 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



JOHN H. SCHACHT. C iqer 

GEORGE J. KAPEL, Comnwrc ■! Manager 



NEW YORK CHICAGO HOLLYWOOD SAN FRANCISCO DALLAS ATLANTA HOUSTON 



10. What is the effect of tv on a new market or tv home? 

SOURCE: "Strangers Into Customers" study for NBC TV Research by W R. Simmons 



Brand Awareness 




,,,1,— 74% 


(Average of 6 TV Brands) 


51%^** 


mi * ■ 




40%" "■ m ~ m 


• SET BUYERS 






• "UNEXPOSED" 






BEFORF TV 


AFTER TV 



2. TV-PROMOTED SLOGANS JUMPED UP 54% 

Three-quarters of viewers knew slogans of six tv- 
sold products after watching tv for several weeks; 
before tv, less than half of the same viewers knew 
same slogans. Instant Maxwell House slogan, for 
instance, gained 150% as a result of tv push. 



1. BRAND "AWARENESS" IS RAISED BY TV 

In special survey conducted in Fort Wayne, Ind., 
before and after start I in fall of '53 1 of local tv 
service NBC TV found that "awareness" of name 
group tv-sold products went to new high (see 
chart) among tv owners compared to non-owners. 



Slogan Identification 
(Average of 6 TV Brands) 

• .SET BUYERS 

• "UNEXPOSED" 

i 
— i 






J 




45% ^*"__J 

JJ To ^^^^^^ 


aM «««*43% 


^^^hjvMh^rkmm 




t 




BEFORE TV 


AFTER TV 



"Very Good' 
(Average of 6 TV 



• SET BUYERS 

• "UNEXPOSED 




3. VIEWERS CONSIDER TV BRANDS "BETTER" 

Women were asked to offer their opinion of tv 
brands on a scale ranging from "Poor" to "Very 
good." Latter rating for every single tv brand went 
up. Gain noted among "unexposed" (to tv) group 
was tripled in video homes. Lilt went from 12% 
to 17%; Cheer jumped up from 17% to 24%. 



4. TV BRANDS ARE PREFERRED 2-TO-l 

Pairs of competing products (tv brands and non- 
tv brands) were checked before and after start of 
local tv. The tv brands all gained, usually at the 
expense of the non-tv, in general brand preference. 



Which k Rpffar? ^- 


i ^^45% 


TV Set Buyers 


ih~% ^g^^^^^^v fPMpHHflf 


■faMHMlH^tofciMW 


^*^"^^^fc 


■ 


^*tJ/o 


|||ppqp^p^^BHBB|Bifir3BBSnBH 




BPWPWIPIPWwSrt^S^HBIIBiHi 


3931 


Siwwi^fi^^HipSBSiiiSiiiHifiii 


• TV BRAND A NON-TV BRAND 






■■ ArTM TV 




5. BUYING OF TV BRANDS SHOT UP 33% 

In less than four months, the average tv-sold brand 
registered a 33% purchase increase among new tv 
viewers in Fort Wayne. Same brands only jumped 
12% among non-tv families. Non-tv brands were 
hard-hit. Bab-0 lost 12% of customers; Ajax 
gained 47%. Scotties doubled sales over pre-tv. 



6. TV "SELLS BEST," SAID RETAILERS 

Separate study was done among all food and drug 
dealers in Fort Wayne after tv. Four dealers in 
every 10 stocked new brands as a result of tv ad- 
vertising. More than twice as many dealers named 
tv as "national advertising doing best job of mov- 
ing goods" compared to those naming other media. 
Dealers gave the best displays to tv-sold products. 




TV BASICS 



page 7 



We're moving more motor cars in motorized San Diego 




4 1 r 'c more than in 1 95 1 

for a 1954 total of $160,956,000- worth! 

This is more "automotive" sales 

than Miami, Louisville or Columbus, Ohio! 

We've got more people, making more, spending more 
and watching Channel 8 more than ever before ! 

* Sales Mgt., 1955 



KFMB 



WRATHFR-U A ARFZ RKOVIn \STll 




■JAL1F. 



REr-RFSFNTFD BY PETRY 



America's more market 



1. What's the cost-per-1,000 commercial minutes of tv shows? 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen. For two weeks ending 12 Feb. 1955 



Cost-per-1,000 Commercial Minutes, by program type 



Half-hour weekly shows: 

MYSTERY DRAMA 



Cost-per-1,000 commercial minutes 



Homes reached Number of 

I Average- Audience basis) tv shows 



$3.70 



5,816,000 



TALENT VARIETY 



$2.90 



5,787,000 



SITUATION COMEDY 



$3.67 



6,456,000 



29 



GENERAL DRAMA 



$3.81 6,122,000 



15 



GENERAL VARIETY 



$3.33 



7,805,000 



QUIZ-AUD. PARTIC. 



$3.53 



5,459,000 



18 



QUARTER-HR. SHOWS 



$3.04 



3,765,000 



13 



ONE-HOUR SHOWS 



$2.54 



8.332,000 



18 



2. How do basic day and night tv buys compare? 



SOURCE: NBC TV Research, based on Nielsen data 



Daytime can offer higher frequency for similar costs 





Alternate week evening half-hour 
(Average all evening Vi-hr. shows) 


Six daytime quarter hours 
(Two quarter hours in 3 shows) 


Total Cost (1) 


$57,000 


$60,800 


Cumulative rating estimate (2) 


22.7 


21.0 


Different homes reached (2) 


6,700,000 


6,300,000 


Frequency per viewing home (2) 


1.0 


2.0 


Home commercial impressions (3) 


18,300,000 


35,300,000 



1. Average all evening half-hour programs as of I 2. Estimate of evening show ratings for 1955. I 3. Using average-per-minute ratings of Nielsen 

| Daytime based on turnover of 3.0 in two weeks. | Television Index to estimate commercial minutes. 






1955 television season (time and talent). 



TV B A S I C S \ we 8 




Theic ore but a few of the 
national and internationally 
known cnlcrpnn •. located in 
the Wheeling - Strubenville 
Area: 

Bloch Brot Tobacco Co 
Columbia South. m Chemical Corp 
Continental Foundry Machine Co. 
Follanibir Steel Corp 
Foitoru Cljtt Co 
Hammond Bag Ci Papir Co 
Harker Pottery Co 
H.in I Atlai Clan Corp 

■| Mjfhm. Producti Co 
Imperial CUit Corp 

Motori Corp 
Louit Mjri Toy Co 
National Analine 
| L Stifcl Son\ Tutiles 
Sylvama Electric Products Inc 
U S Stamping Co 
Wcirton Steel Co 
Whi i ling Corrugating Co. 
Wheeling Steel Corp. 






. . . the Low-Down on the 

UPPER OHIO VALLEY! 



Wheels are whirring in the Wheel- 
ing-Steubenville market — aptly called "the rich 
Ruhr Valley of America." This is a major mar- 
ket with an abundance of natural resources and 
fuel; a plentiful supply of manpower has at- 
tracted and continues to attract more big in- 
dustry. 

The industry is diversified, including steel, steel 
fabricating, chemicals, pottery, glassware, paint, 
toys, tobacco and textiles. 

Smart advertisers have learned the best medium 
to reach this rich market effectively and at the 
lowest cost per thousand is WTRF-TV, Wheeling, 
West Va. Within its coverage area there are 
416,210 families, consisting of 1,409,300 people, 
owning 307,400 television sets. The combined 
annual spendable income of this market is 



$1,973,985,000 or an average of $4,742 per 
household. 

WTRF-TV operates with 316.000 watts on chan- 
nel 7, broadcasting 120 hours of programming 
a week including top NBC and ABC shows, sup- 
plemented by local originations of widespread 
interest. Every survey made in the Wheeling- 
Steubenville area has given WTRF-TV a sweep- 
ing majority, the latest Telepulse indicating 
that 63.5% of the tuned in audience between 
12 noon and midnight dialed channel 7. 

When planning any television campaign in- 
tended to penetrate the major markets of 
America, remember the "Ruhr Valley of Amer- 
ica" and the best medium to reach it — 
WTRF-TV. For availabilities call Hollingbery 
or Bob Ferguson, VP and General Manager. 
Wheeling 1177. 



WHEELING, WEST VIRGINIA 

Channel 7 316,000 Watts 

/ . . tffei for network color 




vy 



11 JULY 1955 



127 



3. What are network per-telecast production cost averages? 

SOURCE: Network Tv Comparagraph, appearing in alternate issues of SPONSOR. Costs below are from 27 June 1955. 

Costs by types range from $200,000 on down 



90 Min. "Spectaculars" 



Av, per show: 



$200,000 



Half-hour Drama 

Ay. per show; $28,000 



One-hour Variety 



Av. per show: 



$66,000 



Quiz, Aud. Partic. 



Av. half hour: 



$14,000 



One-hour Drama 



Av. per show: 



$36,000 



Network Participations 



Av. per minute: 



$4,250 



Situation comedy 



Av. half hour: 



$30,000 



COST RANGE of shows included in tabulations for chart above 
varied widely by categories. Quiz shows ranged from a low of $4,500 



Daytime Quarter-Hours 



Av. per show: 



$2,750 



to a high of $25,000 weekly; hour variety shows ranged from $45,000 
to a peak of $90,000 apiece. Drama shows all were close to average. 



4. What's been the trend in spot tv spending in '53-'54? 



SOURCE: N. C. Rorabaugh 



Biggest spot tv users spent over $30 million 



3rd Quarter 
1953 



4th Quarter 
1953 



1st Quarter 
1934 



2nd Quarter 
1954 



3rd Quarter 
1954 



4th Quarter 
1954 



DETERGENTS, SOAPS $874,658 



TOILET SOAPS 

SHORTENINGS 

MARGARINES 

DENTIFRICES 

HOME PERMANENTS 
SHAMPOOS 



297,242 
92,946 
42,942 
569,842 
663,421 
422,900 



TOTALS $2,963,951 



$1,399,101 
273,272 
97,620 
514,836 
1,024,254 
415,415 
511,043 



$1,157,160 
240,479 
158.843 
1,084,022 
1,597,352 
337,381 
607.987 



$2,327,278 
305,530 
209,014 
722,793 
1.612,558 
699,289 
388,366 



$1,956,100 
402,078 
269.440 
240,816 
1,879.553 
931,765 
705,902 



$1,521,911 
344,708 
411,508 
504,702 
1.865,458 
353.983 
533,986 



$4,235,541 



$5,183,224 



S6.264.828 



$6,385,654 



$5,536,656 



SHIFTING STRATEGY of key brand categories can be seen in 
chart above, prepared by N. C. "Duke" Rorabaugh. Total net (not 
gross) spending for time only was computed using maximum fre- 



quency discount rates on stations used. Brands in study included 
those of Colgate, Lever, P&G, Monsanto, Manhattan Soap. Babbitt, 
Fels. Antell, Jergens, Mrs. Tucker's, Swift. Best Foods, Std. Brands. 



TV BASICS 



page 9 



To SELJ your 

best 
ahoma . . . 





^ SOURCE: Any and every single Hooper, 

Pulse and A.R.B. in the past 6 years -^^ 
. . . area, metropolitan, recall, 
diary and coincidental. Check ANY TV 
rating of Oklahoma and if bears out 
WKY-TV's continuing dominance. 
For the latest, call your Katz 
Representative. 

Ownod and operated by THE OKLAHOMA PUBLISHING COMPANY: The Doily Oklohomon, Oklahoma 01* T.mei. The Farmer -Stockman. WKY, WSFA. WSFA-TV 

lepr«i«nl«d by THE KATZ AGENCY. 




1. How much money (gross) has been invested in net tv ('50-'55) ? 



SOURCE: Publishers Information Bureau 



NETWORK 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


I955 
First 3 Months 




$6,628,662 


$18,585,911 


$18,353,003 


$21,110,680 


$34,713,038 


$11,092,316 


$13,011,831 


$42,470,844 


$69,058,548 


$97,466,809 


$148,222,650 


$46,562,763 


(No report) 


$7,761,506 


$10,140,656 


$12,374,360 


$13,143,919 


$1,949,860 


$21,185,692 


$59,171,452 


$83,242,573 


$96,633,807 


$126,074,597 


$39,714,529 



YEARLY TOTALS 



liW/ $12,294,513 
( JS50] $40,826,185 



iffi/ 5127,989,713 
f liS2\ $180,794,780 



j M53] $227,585,656 
fl954) $320,130,910 



2. How much money have advertisers spent for spot tv time ('50-'55) ? 

SOURCES: Federal Communications Commission; SPONSOR estimates; McCann-Erickson MILLIONS 

190 



100 
75 

50 




190 
100 

75 

50 



1950— $25,034,000 1951— $59,733,000 1952— $80,235,000 1953— $100,000,000' 1954— $189,000,000' 

Dollar figures show national spot revenues of stations AFTER trade discounts of fre- >SPONSOR estimate based on television |ndu«trv and rep forecasts 

quency and dollar volume; REFORE commissions to reps, agencies, brokers. OMcCann Ertckson Central Research Dcpt. esir 



TV BASICS pogeio 






THE 



USIC 




AMERICA! 






popular songs... 

the hits of today and the enduring 
standards of tomorrow. 

production numbers.. 

hit tunes from the most successful 
Broadway shows, past and present, and 
notable Hollywood musical films. 

rhythm and blues... 

new Latin tempos, favorite blues, syncopation 
and jazz— all unmistakably American. 

folk songs... 

work songs, play songs, regional songs, 
mirroring the history of the American people 

sacred music... 

liturgical music, songs of faith, gospel hymns 
expressing the religious beliefs of Americans. 

symphonic and 
concert works... 

works of distinguished composers of 
great classics, daring innovators as well 
as creators in traditional patterns. 

More than 3,900 writers and publishers 
are constantly adding new works 
to the extensive ASCAP repertory. 



/dEk 



... .•" 

The American Society of Composers. Authors and Publishers 



57S Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y. 



what a difference 

a year makes! 






Jl TINE. 1054 



TWO FIRST RUN NATIONAL PROGRAMS 

4i HI 1 / 2H0URS 0F ,,,M ENTERTAINMENT 



JUNE, 1055 



EIGHT FIRST RUN NATIONAL PROGRAMS 
*P^*\ 1/2-H01 RS OF FILM ENTERTAINMENT 



Screen Gems 1955-1956 Production Schedule 



PROGRAM 



Adventures of Rin Tin Tin . . . ABC-TV. . . Fri., 7:30 p. m. 

Captain Midnight.. . CBS-TV.. . Sat., 11:00 a.m. 

Celebrity Playhouse. .. National TV Spot 

Father Knows Best . . . NBC-TV. . .Wed., 8:30 p. m. 

Ford Theatre . . . NBC-TV. . .Thurs., 9:30 p. m. 

Patti Page Show. .. National TV Spot 

Damon Runyon Theatre... CBS-TV... Sat, 10:30 p. m. 

Tales of the Texas Rangers... CBS-TV... Sat, 11:30 a. m. 



SPONSOR 

National Biscuit Co. 
Wander Co. 
Falstaff Brewing 
Scott Paper Company 
Ford Motor Company 
Oldsmohile 
Anheuser-Busch 
General Mills 




ADVERTISING AGENCY 

Kenvon & Eckhardt 
Tatham-Laird 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 
J. Walter Thompson 
J. Walter Thompson 
D. P. Brother & Co. 
D'Arey Advertising 
Tatham-Laird 



TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CORPORATION, 233 WEST 49th STREET, NEW YORK 19. N Y • ClRCU 5-5044 



132 



SPONSOR 



1955 I III. FACTS B tSH ^ SECTlOh 






TV FILM PROGRAMS REPRESENT 30', 
OF ALL PROGRAM HOURS THAT STATIONS CARRY 

Page Xumber 

Q. What's the dollar value of t\ films? 1 

Q. What type of film shows do stations use? 2 

Q. Mow bi<; is audience of film "reruns"? 3 

Q. How much "film time" do stations have? 4 

Q. What arc basic tip* in buying films? 5 

Q. What arc tips for making commercials? 5 

Q. Dors film audience composition \;ir\? 6 

Q. How do yon convert footage to time? 7 



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I The extent Him is used in television 




1. What's the dollar value of the tv film program business today? 



SOURCE: SPONSOR estimate, based on consensus of industry leaders 



A forty-fold increase in seven years. 

Tv films (syndicated shows and features) 
have become a major branch of entertain- 
ment industry in less than decade. Film 
commercials would add another $10 million. 
More than 140 firms are now in the field, 
from smalt independents to big "majors." 



1948 



1955 



2. What percent of all programing does local tv film represent? 

SOURCE: "Film Manual, 1955" of NARTB. Based on survey of U.S. tv stations. 



STATIONS IN 

Group 1 
41.3% 



STATIONS IN 

Group 2 
40.6% 



STATIONS IN 

Group 3 
26.5% 



STATIONS IN 

Group 4 
26.1% 



STATIONS IN 

Group 5 
32.1% 



Kxplanalion of «tatin;i groupings is under chart below. 



3. How many hours per week of local station programing are on film? 

SOURCE: See question 2 above. 








Average Hours Per Week 


















All-station 




Group 1 


Group 2 Group 3 


Group 4 


Group 5 


average 


Network hours 


. 21:17 


32:58 57:36 


60:23 


5 5:04 


50:35 


Local hours 


. 42:40 


42:56 45:58 


53:52 


60:12 


47:50 


Live 


16:17 


12:07 18:34 


24:00 


23:15 


18:26 


Film 


. 26:23 


30:49 27:24 


29:52 


36:57 


29:24 


Total operating hours. 


. 63:57 


75:54 103:34 


114:15 


115:16 


98:25 




Two charts above are from 1955 survey by NARTB to which 106 tv 
outlets in all parts of the U.S. replied. Stations are grouped as 
follows: Group 1: up to 50,000 tv families; Group 2: 50-150,000; 
Group 3: 150-500,000; Group 4: 500-1,000,000; Group 5: over 
1,000,000 tv families. First chart shows clearly that tv films 



(syndicated shows, features) are an important segment of the 
total programing, network and local that stations carry; the aver- 
age for all stations is almost exactly 30%. Second chart shows 
that number of hours of local tv film programing at stations 
in large or small tv markets tops amount of local live programs. 



FILM BASICS I page 1 



4. What type of tv films do stations use (by weekly hours) ? 

SOURCE See question 2 at left. 

Feature film* lead in hours-used each week 



Feature film 


Group 1 


Group 2 


Group i 


•up 4 


Group 5 


All 

stations 


Morning 

Afternoon 

Evening 


6.0 
8.4 


.9 

5.3 

7.4 


1.8 
5.7 
6.5 


1.5 

7.7 

11.1 


2.0 

7.1 

11.5 


1.4 
6.1 
7.9 


Total 


14'A 


13.6 


14.0 


20.3 


20.6 


15.4 


Syndicated film 














Morning 
Afternoon 

Evening 


A 

5.5 


.2 
1.6 
7.4 


.2 
1.6 
6.1 


.4 
1.8 
5.0 


.4 
2.3 
6.2 


.3 
1.6 
6.2 


Total 


5.9 


9.2 


7.9 


7.1 


8.9 


8.1 


Short subjects 














Morning 

Afternoon . 
Evening v 


1.1 
.7 


1.9 
.9 


.5 

1.0 

.5 


.7 

1.1 

.2 


.9 

3.3 

.9 


.4 

1.4 

.6 


Total 


1.8 


2.8 


2.0 


2.0 


5.1 


2.4 


Film produced by station 














Morning 

Afternoon 
Evening 


.1 
.8 


.4 


.1 
.2 


.1 
.3 


.2 

.5 


.1 
.3 


Total ... 


.9* 


.4 


.3 


.4 


.7 


.4 


Free film 














Morning 

Afternoon . . 
Evening . . 


.1 
1.3 
1.4 


.2 
1.6 
1.3 


.6 

1.3 
.5 


1.0 

1.0 

.3 


.1 
.8 
.5 


.5 

1.3 

.7 


Total 


2.8 


3.1 


2.4 


2.3 


1.4 


2.5 


Total Film Hours 














Morning 
Afternoon 

Evening . . 


.1 

8.9 

. 16.8 


1.3 
10.4 
17.4 


3.1 

9.7 

13.8 


3.7 
11.6 
16.9 


3.6 
13.5 
19.6 


2.6 

10.5 
15.7 


Total 


25.8 


29.1 


26.6 


32.2 


36.7 


28.8 



5. What percent of U.S. stations can telecast tv color films? 



SOURCE: SPONSOR survey of U.S. tv stations. |unc 1955 



EQUIPPED 



STATIONS WHICH EXPECT TO BE EQUIPPED BY 



17% 



COLOR FILMS 



END OF 
1955 

10% 



I \I> OF 
2\% 



[ \I> <>r 

2% 



Mi PI KIMTK 
I (il OH I'l \N^ 



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of film progratns 



I 



1. Can film rerun shows still draw large tv audiences? 

SOURCE: A. C Nielsen analysis of repeat telecasts during summer and winter of 1954. Total of 254 reruns on 24 different program series are included in study. 




Summer ratings drop but share holds up well on reruns 



NIELSEN RATING 



SHARE OF AUDIENCE 



31.0% 



22.0% 




47.2% 



43.1% 




Original 



Average of the 254 repeat film telecasts checked by 
Nielsen is 29% lower in rating than the original. But, 
as Nielsen points out, "since the potential audience is 
considerably lower during the rerun times, a more ac- 
curate appraisal involves share of audience and average 
minutes viewed." The average rerun show gets a share 
of audience that is 91% of the level of the original. 



No "mass walkout" on tv reruns 

AVERAGE MINUTES VIEWED 



23.5 mins. 



22.0 mins. 




Original 



Reruns also hold audiences 
who dial them, even if large 
percentage has seen it be- 
fore. Rerun is less than 
two minutes below level of 
first run in terms of min- 
utes spent viewing a show. 



2. How do summer and winter rerun audiences compare? 



SOURCE: See above. 



Winter season repeats are only 20% "off" in rating, and almost a match in share of tv viewing audience 



NIELSEN RATING 



Original 
28.1% 



Rerun 



Original 
28.1% 



Rerun 




WINTER 



SUMMER 



Special break-out of summer and winter re- 
peats were part of Nielsen study. Summer 
repeats fell between 15 June and 15 Sep- 
tember; winter reruns at any other time. 
Charts give admen a chance to find out how 
well a rerun show will do if it runs in the 
same season as the original show (not just 
summer vs. winter). In terms of ratings, 
winter repeats (there were 53 last year) 
were only 20% lower than the first runs. 



SHARE OF AUDIENCE 



Original Rerun 

43.3% 



Original Rerun 



38.7% 425% 39.3% 




WINTER 



SUMMER 



Summer repeats were 34% lower than the 
originals. But winter rerun shares of tv 
viewing audience were only off an average 
of 11%. Summer repeats were off even less 
— 8%. The reruns in both seasons also 
held up strongly in terms of average num- 
ber of minutes of viewing. Winter repeats 
were down 5% and summer repeat shows 
were down l c '< . Admen therefore can safe- 
ly assume reruns will draw at any season. 



FILM BASICS I pave 3 




11 JULY 1955 



139 




fl 



/// Availability of time far iilwn 



1. How much "film time" is left locally to network affiliates? 



SOURCE: SPONSOR survey of major tv networks June 1955 



Black portion is "network option"; white is "local option' 



ABC 



CBS 



DTN 



NBC 



A.M. 
8:00 

9:00 

10:00 

11:00 

Noon 

1:00 

2:00 

3:00 

4:00 

5:00 

6:00 

7:00 

8:00 

9:00 

10:00 

11:00 

12:00 

P.M. 



EAST 
ROCKIES 



PACIFIC 



MIDWEST 



EAST 
ROCKIES 



PACIFIC 



MIDWEST 



EAST 

ROCKIES 



PACIFIC 



MIDWEST 



EAST 

ROCKIES 

PACIFIC 



MIDWEST 





Option setup varies widely: With the U.S. developing more and 
more toward eventual pattern of three (and perhaps four) tv sta- 
tions in major cities, adherence to pattern of "network" and "local" 
time shown above is more widely maintained than last year. 

Generally speaking, non-network film advertisers must look to 
the "white" portions of the chart above in discussing film avail- 
abilities with network-affiliated stations. Hours shown are for 
regular weekday scheduling. With few exceptions, the same pat- 
tern is held on weekends too. 

The charted time segments, however, are not strictly held at all 
times. Since tv viewing peaks at night, networks have edged in 
earlier, and later, than the times shown here. ABC TV, for in- 
stance, televises John Daly News for Miles Laboratories across-the- 
board at 7:15 p.m. NBC and CBS tv webs have a near-full schedule 
of shows running now in late-evening slots which are technically 






page 4 



"station time." Also, both NBC and CBS have marginal-hour shows 
like Morning Show and Tonight which operate in what is strictly 
"station time," though the station has the right to refuse to carry it. 

There is another side to the coin. Powerful affiliates in two-sta- 
tion markets sometimes refuse to clear for a network show in net- 
work time, using their 10:30-11:00 p.m. slots as a bargaining 
weapon. Then, they will occasionally sell a prime slot to a local 
or national spot advertiser, usually for a film show. This is true 
to some extent of the stations that make up the Vitapix-Guild 
tie-up, who have allotted some five hours weekly for the sole 
purpose of airing only Yitapix-sold shows. 

Independent stations do not face this problem at all. Thus, 
some stations in New York and Hollywood do almost all pro- 
graming on film. 




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SOURCE: SPONSOR survey of leading agencymen, film distributors 



la Production quality: Don't be afraid to check closely on a 
producer or distributor's industry reputation. The successful vet- 
erans are proud to screen samples of series they've produced. Pilot 
films of yet-to-be-completed series aren't always a good guide. Pro- 
ducers sometimes overspend to get a good pilot, ease up on others. 


9a Contract protections: Clients should check carefully as to 
the coverage they have against nuisance lawsuits, damage to film 
prints, and other questions of legal protection. With film costs on 
the rise today, clients should work out an equitable scale of "esca- 
lator clauses" in the event of union increases on new film shows. 


■£■ Financial backing: Most large film distributors today have 
survived because they are well-financed. Still, always check the 
financial reliability of film program source. Some clients even 
require producers or distributors to post bonds. This will guar- 
antee the delivery of a film series that's still in production. 


Wa Reruns of tv films: The film market is flooded today with 
rerun properties. Many have excellent ptdling power, however. 
But it's wise to look closely at ratings cited as "typical," whether 
the show originally ran on a network or in local syndication. Best 
bet : look at season averages for the nation, or for many markets. 


<$■ Distribution: Film is a fragile thing. In major non-network 
film deals, always check the syndicator's distribution and inspec- 
tion facilities. Stations are notoriously "rough" on tv film. If 
prints are to be rotated between stations, it's best that they be re- 
turned to a central point for checkups for breaks, bad cutting. 


/■ Pricing: In the tv film field, prices vary widely between sim- 
ilar program series and comparable markets. Reruns generally 
cost less than brand-new, first-run shows. Don't use a low price 
as your main guide any more than you'd buy only on the basis of 
a tv rating. Look also at production quality, audience composition. 


•»■ Scheduling: Non-network lineups for a single advertiser of 
75 stations or more are not uncommon. But, syndicators rarely 
give more than a dozen prints without extra charge. Be sure to 
allow enough staggering of starting dates so this amount of prints 
can be "bicycled" between stations. Extra prints can be costly. 


Oi Time contracts: In a multi-market film program deal, check 
closely on your contracts for time with local stations. Are you 
guaranteed a "make-good" in your regular time slot if your sbow 
is "bumped" for a special telecast? Do you have the proper rate 
protections? Advice of agency timebuyers can save you much grief. 



2. What are the basic tips in making tv film commercials? 



SOURCE: SPONSOR survey of agencies, commercial producers, syndicators 



JLa Show talent: If you're making film commercials to be in- 
serted in a multi-market syndicated film program series, check to 
see if star talent from the show is available to make commercials. 
Most film stars are. Costs are reasonable, since shooting is sand- 
wiched into weekly schedule of producing syndicated film shows. 


9a Scene timing: A common mistake in film commercials is to 
jam in too many short scenes with too many copy points. The re- 
verse, leaving a scene on-screen so long it becomes static, also 
weakens impact, makes viewers fidget. There's no easy solution. It's 
best to evolve storyboards in conjunction with veteran producers. 


£m Audio vs. video: A good tv film commercial, many experts 
feel, should be capable of selling through audio portion alone. 
But don't make your commercial merely filmed radio "sell." Right 
balance is achieved when you have a good clear product story to 
tell orally and integrate your selling with proper demonstration. 


Ob Demonstration : Most effective film commercials, from a 
sales standpoint, are considered to be those built around smooth, 
sincere product demonstration. But beware of giving "demonstra- 
tor" an overly complicated task. It distracts from his or her 
sales ability even if done right, means expensive retakes if wrong. 


3a Talent fees: Don't try to be a C. B. De Mille. Union 
charges for actor in commercials come high. Adroit storyboard 
planning can keep number of actors to functional minimum, per- 
haps even reduce human element to shots of hands, stock shots, 
clever vocal "sell." Use of music libraries can cut talent costs. 


# a Lip synchronization: Be sparing with "lip-sync." It means 
expensive processing and lab work. In demonstrations, you'll cut 
costs if you start a scene with lip-sync, then shift to a voice- 
over technique using closeup of hands in action, and then 
finish off with lip-sync. This also lowers your film talent fees. 


■»■ Special effects: Go easy on the trick opticals. Memorability 
research (by Schwerin et al.) shows that the over-produced film 
commercial, replete with fancy splits, wipes, animation, is often 
pretty to watch, but lacks punch of many simple commercials. 
Ill' i ts should be used sparingly. Besides, they are often expensive. 


Oi Two-for-one shooting: If your tv campaign calls for both 
one minute announcements and station breaks, you'll save money 
if you plan your shooting carefully. Storyboards should be devel- 
oped so that a 20-second or 30-second segment can be lifted intact 
out of the minute commercial. This avoids extra talent charges. 



IV Tips an buying film 

1. What are the basic tips in buying syndicated film shows? 




1 1 M BASICS i P a o* 5 




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11 JULY 1955 



145 



3. How does tv film audience composition vary? 

SOURCE "U.S. Pulse Tv." April 1955 

Syndicated shows attract wide range of viewers 




Segments of tlu- t\ viewing audience — men, women, teen- 
agers, children — can be pinpointed through the selection 
of the right type of tv film program. 

I he chart below, taken from the spot film section of 
the \|iril 1955 "U.S. Pulse Tv" report, itemizes the audi- 
ence composition of all of the well-known tv syndicated 
programs covered in the Pulse report. The checkup cov- 
ered 22 major < ities. 

Examination of these audience figures will reveal many 
important clues to spot film advertisers. For example, 
the) make clear that different types of film shows defi- 
nitel) attract different audiences. Westerns, like "Annie 
Oakley" or "Gene Autry" draw nearly half of their audi- 
ence per 100 viewing homes from small fry; programs 
with a definitely adult appeal, like "Foreign Intrigue" and 
"I Led Three Lives" draw more than 80' c of their viewers 



from the ranks of the grownups in homes viewing the 
shows throughout the U.S. 

Ihere are, however, some interesting variations from 
these obvious cases. Women viewers have a surprisinglv 
strong taste for high adventure and police drama. They 
rarely number less than 30% of the viewers of such shows 
as "China Smith," "Mr. District Attorney," "Passport to 
Danger," and "The Whistler"; often, they comprise 50% 
or more of the audience. They also like musical shows. 

Teenagers follow no particular pattern. About 10% 
of recording star Frankie Laine's audience is from the 
teen group, but about the same percentage can be found 
in the audiences to "Racket Squad," "Star Showcase/' 
"Waterfront," and "Little Rascals." 

Men only represent about 26% of the "Liberace" audi- 
ence, but soar to 45' { of "Inner Sanctum" viewers. 



,.-<\'X ■f<Z'\ *••'■'*■ 



AUDIENCE 
COMPOSITION 



Syndicated film show: 

Abbott & Costello 

AH Star Theatre 

Amos 'n' Andy 

Annie Oakley 

Badge 714 

Biff Baker U.S.A 

Boston Blackie 

Captain Gallant 

Captured 

China Smith 

Cisco Kjd 

City Assignment 

City Detective 

Colonel March 

Conrad ISagel Theatre 

Corliss Archer 

Cowboy G-Men 

Dangerous Assignment 

Death Valley Days 

Dick Tracy 

Douglas Fairbanks Presents. 

Eddie Cantor Show 

Ellery Queen 

Facts Forum 

Falcon 

Famous Playhouse 

Favorite Story 

Flash Gordon 

Florian Zabach 

Follow That Man 

Foreign Intrigue 

Frankie Laine 

Gene Autry 

Hans C. Andersen Tales ... 

Heart of the City :.... 

Hopalong Cassidy 

I'm the Law 

I Led Three Lives 



1 




\5v 


1 ^ 


jj 




Per 100 


viewing 


homes: 




• 
Men 


Women 


Teen 


Children 


Total 


21 


41 


19 


107 


188 


47 


72 


16 


49 


184 


77 


74 


19 


36 


206 


40 


52 


21 


98 


211 


73 


72 


22 


86 


253 


88 


80 


19 


26 


213 


88 


81 


22 


30 


221 


56 


51 


25 


61 


193 


79 


66 


18 


43 


206 


79 


76 


19 


34 


208 


48 


29 


31 


96 


204 


61 


74 


23 


37 


195 


83 


79 


19 


11 


192 


87 


72 


15 


7 


181 


71 


89 


19 


16 


195 


50 


74 


25 


48 


197 


51 


47 


21 


85 


204 


84 


88 


15 


17 


204 


77 


71 


21 


52 


221 


31 


52 


23 


98 


204 


79 


86 


18 


10 


193 


84 


87 


22 


18 


211 


83 


82 


18 


7 


190 


79 


76 


13 


6 


174 


85 


85 


12 


9 


191 


71 


83 


12 


16 


182 


75 


91 


13 


19 


198 


48 


55 


19 


91 


213 


56 


85 


16 


21 


178 


69 


84 


19 


27 


199 


86 


93 


25 


7 


211 


71 


83 


19 


8 


181 


53 


60 


18 


96 


227 


51 


59 


16 


66 


192 


64 


81 


16 


29 


190 


66 


53 


19 


99 


237 


81 


86 


10 


26 


203 


81 


82 


18 


37 


218 



AUDIENCE 
COMPOSITION 



Syndicated film show: 

Inner Sanctum 

Inspector Mark Saber 

International Police 

Janet Dean R.N 

Jeffrey Jones 

Joe Palooka 

Kit Carson 

Laurel & Hardy 

Liberace 

Life of Riley 

Life with Elizabeth 

Little Rascals 

Lone Wolf 

Man Behind the Badge 

Mayor of the Town 

Mr. District Attorney 

Mr. & Mrs. .North 

My Hero 

Passport to Danger 

Playhouse 

Racket Squad 

Ramar of the Jungle 

Range Rider 

Secret File L.S.A 

Sherlock Holmes 

Space Ranger 

Star & the Story 

Star Showcase 

Stories of the Century 

Superman 

Terry & the Pirates 

Victory at Sea 

Visitor 

Waterfront 

Where Were You? 

Whistler 

Wild Bill Hickok 

NOTE: Survtytne was done In first week 




Per 100 viewing homes: 



- 
Men 


Women 


Teen 


Children 


Total 


89 


85 


19 


8 


201 


67 


61 


23 


48 


199 


84 


91 


22 


21 


218 


66 


92 


16 


11 


185 


77 


80 


14 


23 


194 


57 


77 


25 


33 


192 


51 


46 


25 


86 


208 


44 


41 


24 


87 


196 


46 


92 


22 


17 


178 


75 


72 


31 


24 


202 


72 


86 


16 


32 


206 


41 


53 


24 


95 


213 


74 


83 


16 


25 


198 


77 


79 


16 


31 


203 


71 


87 


22 


18 


198 


81 


89 


16 


9 


195 


83 


88 


24 


13 


208 


62 


76 


16 


35 


189 


73 


67 


19 


9 


168 


63 


81 


16 


28 


188 


73 


80 


17 


19 


189 


39 


36 


23 


93 


191 


59 


41 


23 


88 


211 


67 


76 


23 


31 


197 


75 


77 


17 


33 


202 


36 


31 


22 


93 


182 


71 


86 


16 


21 


194 


45 


81 


19 


35 


180 
193 
182 


66 


77 


19 


31 


35 


27 


24 


96 


38 


30 


21 


83 


172 


69 


73 


24 


56 


222 


66 


77 


19 


34 


196 


79 


79 


21 


13 


192 


64 


72 


18 


34 


188 


81 


91 


21 


9 


202 


38 


31 


22 


93 


184 


of March 1955 









BA 



page 6 





The direction- of any fit 

portant part in obtaining the 

At Precision, expert guidance through each 
producers, cameramen and director* the 

All of which leads to another fomi of direr 
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rocedure where experience plays an im- 
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the processing operation assures 
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4. How do you convert minutes to footage (and vice versa) ? 



SOURCE: Screen Cems, May 1955 




Admen often fare the troublesome task of figuring out 
what, exactly, is the running time of so-and-so feet of 16 
or 35 mm. commercial footage. Just as often, the reverse 
problem, of determining how many feet of film are in a 
20-second announcement or a full-length film program, 
pops up at agency tv departments. 

A handy solution appears below in the form of a chart 
developed by Screen Gems' Peter Keane, the Columbia 
Pictures subsidiary's top technical man. It's based on the 
standard rates of film travel in tv projectors. 

It works like this: To convert odd lengths of 35 or 16 
mm. footage into running time, accurate to within a third 
of a second, break the total film length down into the 
basic lengths shown in the tables (first thousands of feet, 
then hundreds, then multiples of ten, then single feet) and 
then look up the running time for each segment. Then, 
you merely add them up for the correct answer. 



1 he process is reversed to convert time into footage. You 
add up the footage counts for the nearest number of whole 
minutes, then seconds, you're working with. 

Here's an example: Suppose you have a 16 mm. film 
reel that's 522 feet long. What's the running time? Well, 
360 feet is 10 minutes. And, 144 feet is four minutes. 
And, 18 feet is 30 seconds. Answer: 522 feet of 16 mm. 
film is a program that is 14:30 long. 

Here's another: Suppose you have to have a 35 mm. 
film commercial that runs a minute and a half. How many 
feet is that? Well, 100 feet runs a little more than a min- 
ute. And, 30 feet will run exactly 20 seconds. The differ- 
ence of three and one-third seconds, will be matched with 
a five-foot length. Answer: 135 feet of 35 mm. film runs 
1:30. 

Screen Gems even has a slide rule version. It's avail- 
able to tv admen, film editors without charge. 



TABLE CONVERTS FILM FOOTAGE TO TIME OR VICE VERSA 



FOOTAGE TO TIME 


FOOTAGE 


TO TIME 




TIMEWFOOTAGE in 35mm. . 


... in 


16mm 


in 
35mm 


f 


1 

O 

o 

5Q 


o 

••8 
s « 


in 

16 mm 




i 
< 


"5- 

: £ 1 
, e ° 

> 6-, Z 




/ 

«0 

S 

3 


■3 

c 
o 


Is 


r 

ft, 


i 


3 


•0 

I 
■ 

E 
ft. 




^ 


Vz 


00 


Sej| 


.33 


y 2 


E3| 









00 


KM 


.33 




8 




8 


1 

2 


00 
00 


BRIM 


.67 
.33 


i 

2 




B 


1 .67 
3 .33 




00 
00 


00 
00 


.50 
.67 




12 
16 




12 
16 


3 


WjM 


02 


■ftltjUg 


3 


|^M 


Kj 


■ ' - '■ 




00 


01 


KlJH 


1 


8 




24 


4 




02 


.67 


4 




E 


6 .67 




00 


02 




3 





1 


8 


5 


00 


03 


.33 


5 


00 


B 


8 .3 


3 




00 


03 


B^M 


4 


8 


1 


32 


6 


00 


04 


ffiujHf 


6 


Kom 


i 




H 




CO 


04 




6 





2 


16 


7 


00 


04 


.67 


7 




i 


1 .6 


7 




00 


05 


bBwM 


7 


8 


3 





8 


K&M 


.05 


.33 


8 


Etl 


i 


3 .3 


3 




00 


06 


.00 


9 





3 


24 


9 


00 


06 


.00 


9 


00 


i 


5 .0 







00 


07 


.00 


10 


8 


4 


8 


10 


00 


06 


.67 


10 


00 


i 


5 .67 




00 


08 


.00 


12 





4 


32 


20 


00 


13 


.33 


20 


00 


3 


3 .33 




00 


09 


.00 


13 


8 


5 


16 


30 


00 


20 


.00 


30 


00 


5 


.00 




00 


10 


.00 


15 





6 





40 


00 


26 


.67 


40 


01 





5 .67 




00 


mm 




30 





12 





50 


00 


33 


.33 


50 


01 


2 


5 .33 




00 


WsM 


B^9 


45 





18 





60 


00 


40 


.00 


60 


01 


4 


3 .00 




00 


40 


.00 


60 





24 





70 


00 


46 


.67 


70 


01 


& 


5 .67 


00 


50 


iEJU^H 


75 





30 





SO 


00 


53 


.33 


80 


02 


1 


J .33 




01 


00 


.00 


90 





36 





90 


01 


00 


.00 


90 


wtvm 


31 


3 .00 




02 


00 


.00 


180 





72 





100 


01 


06 


.67 


100 


02 


4 


5 .67 




03 


00 


.00 


270 





108 





200 


02 


13 


.33 


200 


05 


3. 


5 .33 




04 


00 


.00 


360 





144 





500 


05 


33 


.33 


500 


13 


5; 


i .33 




05 


00 


.00 


450 





180 





600 


06 


40 


.00 


600 


16 


4 


3 .00 




06 


00 


.00 


540 





216 





700 


07 


46 


.67 


700 


19 


2( 


5 .67 




07 


00 


.00 


630 





252 





800 


08 


53 


.33 


800 


22 


1. 


5 .33 




08 


00 


.00 


720 





288 





900 


10 


00 


.00 


900 


25 


01 


) .00 


09 


00 


.00 


810 





324 





1000 


11 


06 


.67 


1000 


27 


4( 


5 .67 




10 


00 


.00 


900 





360 





2000 


22 


13 


.33 


2000 


55 


3. 


J .33 




20 


00 


.00 


1800 





720 





3000 


33 


20 


.00 




C) 


JPY 


RIGHT 19S5 


SCREEN 


30 

CEMS. 


00 

INC. 


.00 


2700 





1080 






FILM BASICS 



page 7 



ARB PROVES 



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CHANNEL 7 
AUSTIN, TEXAS 



CHANNEL 14 
WACO. TEXAS 



UNDUPLICATED COVERAGE 
OF CENTRAL TEXAS 



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According to ARB (March, 1955) 

96% of the viewers in Austin, 
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TV more than 3 times 
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152 



SPONSOR 



1955 I III. I iCTS B ISH - SECTION 





SPOT 



Buying strategy is shifting with more advertisers interested in after- 
noon and evening time. Timelmyers today feel spot radio can be 
better buy than at any previous time if it's bought creatively and 
without prejudice (see quotes herein). Coverage starts page 1 •"> I 



NETWORK 

"Strip" network advertisers aow outnumber regular program advertisers 
more than two-to-one as advertisers shool for big cumulative audien 

Buying patterns offer maximum flexibility, with multiple insertions 
easy to buy on all net-. Network coverage ~t.nl- page 170 



SPOT RADIO 

• Spot radio's steady billings growth over the years of tv's rise will 
continue. Advertisers won't be spending as much per announcement but 
saturation frequencies plus use of the medium by completely new accounts 
will mean greater over-all spending in national spot than ever before 

• Concept that it's more important to pinpoint the type of people 
who buy your product than it is to get a high mass rating will grow 

• A big upsurge in use of spot radio will follow regular publication of 
figures on spending in the medium by individual advertisers. (For first 
published list of dollar expenditures in spot by major clients as com- 
piled by SPONSOR see page 49.) Some form of industry dollar spend- 
ing list, like those of other major media (PIB, etc.) is inevitable 

• You may not recognize radio programing two or three years hence. 
It will shoot for excitement with fullest exploitation of tape news and 
feaure techniques designed to get the community talking about radio 



Buying trends 

Q. What trends characterize 
spot radio in fall 1955? 

A. One of the most significant 
changes this year is the reevaluation 
of periods other than over-crowded 
early-mornings. Several factors have 
contributed to the trend toward buying 
day and nighttime radio: 

1. Readjusted rate structures, in 
many cases eliminating Class "A 
prices, have made nighttime radio more 
attractive. 

2. Advertisers and agencies have 
learned to look at audiences delivered 
in relation to cost and availability, 
rather than merely in terms of tv 
competition. 

3. Early-morning radio did such a 
fine job for advertisers that they 
looked radio over again whenever 
early-morning was scarce. 

Here is some of recent client activity 
that characterizes the trend away from 
morning-only radio: 

Regular Maxwell House Coffee, 
through Benton & Bowles, used to buy 
mornings only, is now moving into 
afternoons as well. In this instance, 
reps sold them on the idea. 



Pall Mall used to have a "no radio 
after 9:00 a.m." ruling. About three 
months ago the cigarette firm, via 
SSCB, bought evening radio schedules 
in virtually every major market. Its 
reasoning: Nielsen figures proved that 
the buy gave an excellent cost-per- 
1,000. Said Walter Bowe, timebuyer 
for Pall Mall: "Of course, we're just 
moving in a limited way. It's not a 
wholesale return to nighttime radio, 
but a return nonetheless." 

Herbert Tareytons use pretty much 
a round-the-clock schedule from 6:00 
a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 

Sunoco, through Ruthrauff & Ryan, 
which bought mornings primarily last 
year, now buys 4:30-7:00 p.m. Says 
the agency: "If we wanted to stay in 
radio, we had to reexplore afternoons 
and evenings to get the schedules we 
wanted." 

Lever Brothers' Surf, through BBDO, 
is exploring local personalities on 
radio throughout the day for its fall 
campaign. 

Pal Blades, also via BBDO, has 
turned to news and sports adjacencies 
during late afternoon, is moving into 
several markets with 5:00-8:00 p.m. 
schedules, rather than last years' 
morning-onlv announcements. 



Beyond the exploration of other than 
7:00-9:00 a.m. periods, there's a 
definite reevaluation of eveningtime 
listening. Such research as a Pulse 
Study made for RAB in December 
1953 is gradually gaining attention in 
client offices. That particular study 
showed that 85 % of all businessmen 
are regular radio listeners, and in this 
proportion throughout the day: morn- 
ings, before work — 58 % listen regu- 
larly; mornings and afternoons at 
work — 17% listen regularly; evenings, 
after work — 58% listen regularly; at 
bedtime — 23 % listen regularlv. It's 
significant that evening and early- 
morning listening are on a par. 



Q. How do timebuyers look at 
spot radio in 1955? 

A. Mediamen at the top radio-tv 
agencies feel that spot radio today can 
be a better buy than it's ever been, if 
it is bought creatively and without 
prejudice. Thev point out that the 
rate structures have generally been 
adjusted and that changes in program- 
ing and in selling radio have made 
spot radio more attractive in 1955. 
Here are some typical comments 
from timebuyers at major agencies: 



154 



SPONSOR 



Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample "Satura* 
don buys are continuing, in fact, we re 
generall) buying more frequency 1 1 1 i -» 

year than last, -ill other factors being 
equal M\ definition of saturation is 
to reach s high (70-90$ | of the 
people at [east three or Four times a 

week. In a one-station market thi- 

mighl In- achieved with 1 5 announce- 
ments weekly." 

Phis agency i- the largest I .S. radio 

agencv. with SI!! million in radio 

billings in 1954. 

Scheideler, Beck & W ernei "Earlj 
morning and 5:00-7:00 p.m. are still 

the most popular times, hut people are 

finding evening more desirable because 
of rate adjustments. Minutes are more 
popular than anything, and not as 

tough to gel now a- in days when 

more shows were commercial. 

Big radio spenders within this 
agencj are: Manhattan Soap Co., Ster- 
ling Salt, Mueller's Macaroni. 

Ogilvy. Benson & Mather — '"The 
pressure for earls -morning time has 
let oil a hit. herause agencies find they 
can make up for lower ratings of day- 
time radio through cost and frequene\ 
and that it pays out for women's 
products in terms of pinpointing an 
audience. We have no formula for 
saturations, but we feel that 10 to 15 
announcement-, a week won't do a thing 
today. We figure 50 ( o of the people in 
a market as an approximate objective 
and with 2.0 rated spots it might take 
70 a week to get 40 r f , plus maybe 
another r>0 announcements a week to 
get the other 109? •'" 

Benton & Bowles — "Radio availabil- 
ities are tighter this fall than last, 
because people are coming back into 
the medium. Some of the so-called 
prime evening times are popular again 
because of rate reductions and because 
advertisers are finding out that there 
are tv markets where people do listen 
to radio during the evening." 

J. \\ alter Thompson — "We generally 
buy early-morning and early-evening 
for men's products, daytime for 

women's. The situation hasn't changed 
materially since last year, except that 
rates have fallen in line. New develop- 
ments may, however, result from the 
effect of Monitor on weekend radio 
and upon the programing structure all 
told." 

Biow-Beirn-Toigo — "It is our firm 



HOW BUYERS VIEW FALL SPOT RADIO 




CLIFF BOTWAY 

Damn Fitzgerald-Sample, N. Y. 
"This fall Bpol radio frequenc) 

will he up in general. The old 

ua\ - of buj ing spot radio on 

a five- or six-a-week basis 

have virtual!) disappeared 
except in isolated in-tan. es. 




BrinkerhoQ A. II illiams, \. Orleans 

"In ordei t vei a market well with 

i nil... ,i |.ir. i i i- b -t oil l.\ spread- 
ing bis w beduli ovei all the statii 
in the market, rather than throwing the 

lull -aim ation * hedllle into one." 




ARTHUR PARDOLL 

Foote, Cone & Belding, New York 
" \moni: the overlooked buj a in radio 

i- weekend radio. The trend toward 

examining daytime, rather than early- 
morning onlj during the week is 
well undei waj . but weekend radio 

-till has t me into it- ow n. 



ANN JANOWICZ 

Ogilvy, Benson & Mather, S. Y. 

"Saturation radio mean- different 
things to different clients. However, 
it may be possible to reach f"' I of an 
available audience with 50 announce- 
ments weekly, but it might take 30 
more announcements to get 1"'< more." 




11 JULY 1955 



155 



Spot radio 



belief (with the qualification that this 
is more applicable to large market 
areas) that for many products radio 
presents many more advantages as a 
selling instrument than television. Be- 
sides the obvious cost advantage which 
allows high radio saturation, there 
are merchandising and efficiency ad- 
vantages. But more important are the 
following facts underscored by a re- 
cent Politz survey: (1) in tv areas 
during an average winter day two out 
of three adults listen to radio. (2) By 
the time people go to bed, radio had 
reached no less than 65 out of every 
100 people in tv areas. I 3 I By the end 
of seven days it has reached 88 out 
of every 100. Is it surprising that 
many advertisers are placing large 
portions of their budgets in radio?" 
(The Politz study referred to above 
was conducted for three stations rep- 
resented by Henry I. Christal Co. — 
WGY, Schenectady; WHAS, Louis- 
ville; WJR, Detroit.) 



Programing 

Q. Are there major programing 
changes underway? 

A. During the past year, many sta- 
tions have done a real job of revamp- 
ing and changing their programing 
structure. There's a bigger attempt 
being made to take advantage of 
radio's immediacy through greater use 
of on-the-spot coverage. Many stations 
are no longer satisfied with merely 
programing music and news, but have 
been adding mobile news units to 
attract listeners, create excitement. 

Aubrey Williams, of Brinkerhoff and 
Williams, New Orleans, makes these 
comments about one multi-station 
market, New Orleans: "We have seven 
independent stations and two network 
affiliates. Well, four of the indies 
program just news and music. Then 
some stations tried to attract people 
with such gimmicks as Lucky Buck 
contests, and so forth. But there's 
only so far you can go with that type 
of thing, and finally they attacked the 
programing structure, added mobile 
news units and gave their station a 
flavor of being right there and in the 
>\\ing." (Williams headed up radio 
and tv buying for many years at Fitz- 
gerald agency, New Orleans, before 
Brinkerhoff and Williams was organ- 
ized earlier this year.) 

This move out of the studios in most 
markets preceded NBC Radio's Moni- 



tor, but agencymen around the country 
feel that Monitor will probably acceler- 
ate the revamping of programing 
structures that's been getting under- 
way in a major manner this year. 



Selling trends 

Q. What's different now about 
spot radio selling? 

A. There's been a gradual de-empha- 
sis on the use of ratings with far more 
qualitative information available and 
in use than at any time previously. 
While the conventional sales pattern 
of individual station sale by represen- 
tatives remains basic, there have been 
several instances of new approaches to 
spot selling of large station combina- 
tions. 

Quality Radio Group, for example, 
offers nighttime and weekend programs 
on its approximately three dozen affil- 
iates covering an estimated 90% of 
U.S. homes. QRG was organized last 
fall as a cooperative tape programing 
group. Its president is Ward Quaal 
of Crosley Broadcasting Corp.; execu- 
tive v. p. is William B. Ryan, formerly 
president of BAB (now RAB). 

Two representative organizations 
which have group sales plans are John 
Blair and Co. and CBS Spot Sales. 

The Blair plan is called National 
Saturation Group (NATS AT) and pro- 
vides extra discounts for advertisers 
buying all of the Blair-represented sta- 
tions as a group. 

CBS Radio Spot Sales calls its sales 
approach Group Buying Plan. It's set 
up to offer discounts which increase 
with the number of CBS Radio Spot 
Sales stations purchased at night. 



Research 

Q. What characterizes radio re- 
search, 1955? 

A. Radio research today mirrors the 
current spot radio philosophy of both 
sellers and buyers. It emphasizes fig- 
ures which go beyond the per-an- 
nouncement or per-program audience. 
Pulse, for example, in December 
1954 began making cumulative audi- 
ence studies in New York, Philadel- 
phia, Baltimore, New Orleans, San 
Diego and Los Angeles. Today Pulse 
has measured cumulative audience in 
22 markets. Done by quarter hours 
during three periods of the day — 



morning, afternoon, evening — the stud- 
ies show cumulative audiences through- 
out the day or on a weekly basis. 

The new Nielsen Station Index em- 
phasizes qualitative data, including 
four-week cumulative audience; fre- 
quency of listening; audience compo- 
sition. 

NSI (covering both radio and tele- 
vision) has prepared reports on 11 
markets to date, expects to add mar- 
kets at the rate of two a month. It 
expects to be measuring 30 markets 
by the end of 1955 and the 50 top 
markets by the end of 1956. 

NSI introduces a new measurement 
technique into radio and tv measure- 
ment — the use of diaries combined 
with a mechanical reminder and mea- 
suring device. 



Negro radio 

Q. Is the Negro radio market 
still growing? 

A. From all reports — definitely yes. 
The uptrend in Negro radio which 
sponsor reported last fall in its Negro 
Section (20 September 1954 issue), 
has continued in high gear. 

There has been an increase in sta- 
tions adding Negro programing to 
their schedules or expanding this type 
of programing. Last fall sponsor 
estimated that about 400 radio stations 
were airing Negro-appeal shows based 
on stations reporting to the 1954 
Program Guide) ; currently, sponsor's 
Buyers' Guide lists the number of 
radio stations programing at least 
partially for the local Negro audience 
as 596. 



Q. How can advertisers best sell 
to Negroes via radio? 

A. Don't use high-pressure selling; 
factual, "reason why" approach brings 
best results. Let Negro performers or 
announcers deliver your message in 
their own style. Never produce com- 
mercials in a synthetic "Negro speech;" 
let the station rewrite your copy, or 
simply furnish a fact sheet. Don't 
expect short-term miracles from Negro 
radio; consistency wins here just as 
it does in other kinds of radio. Though 
music shows — from blues to jazz — get 
a big audience, the gospel programs 
and homemaking shows reach more 
Negro women. 



156 



SPONSOR 



Averages, 
schmaverages, 



It's the rating 



)()l fret 



(luil counts 



It won'l help \<>u if th<- average guj in your outfit 1 

eant...it'e the rating jrouVe ^>t thai counts. In radio 
consistently good specifu ratings are available t" ) <>l 
on KIIJ Los Angeles and K I R( ^.m I ran< i 
Compare them with specific ratings ... not a 
offered on other Btations. 

Compare tin- low. I<>\\ -iiml<- day-or-nighl rates, 
completeness of coverage and Intensity ol penetration "i 

tln-e k<\ Don I.ee >lat ion- with an\ Other Btationi <>r. 

for thai matter, an) other media. 

\\ h\ be a yard bird when the low <-<i-t pre thousand 

I lower than any other media) will make your Bales dollar 
go farther — work harder — in two of the nation'- richesl 
market- ... with programs, participation- or -pot- 
on KIIJ Los Angeles and KFRC San Francisco. 




Represented Nationally 



SAN 



T* r 



by H-R REPRESENTATIVES, INC. f 



D ©N LEE 

«AD|Q 



O** 



11 JULY 1955 



157 






NEW ENGLAND'S FIVE MOST POPUU 

'WWW—————— — — —— . ^M—TTTI 



-. -- 



ALL ON WBZ + WBZA 



mm 







WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 



RADIO 

WBZ + WBZA— BOSTON 

KYW — PHILADELPHIA 

KDKA— PITTSBURGH 

WOWO— FORT WAYNE 

KEX— PORTLAND 



TELEVISION 
BOSTON— WBZ-TV 
PHILADELPHIA — WPTZ 
PITTSBURGH — KDKA -TV 
SAN FRANCISCO — KPIX 



KP.IX REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY. INC. 

All other WBC stations represented by Free a Peters 




:ARL de SUZE 

6:30-9:30 AM 

londay thru Saturday 

WBZ + WBZA 



lore New England homes listen to each of these WBZ -WBZA person- 
ifies than to any local or network radio program on any other Boston 
jfion.* 

le imaginative showmanship and station promotion that won the 1955 
iriety Showmanship Award for WBZ + WBZA resulted in more New 
lgland homes tuning to WBZ + WBZA programs and personalities 
tween the hours of 6 A.M. and midnight than to any other Boston 
dio station. t 

WBZ + WBZA is an undisputed FIRST in New England radio. FIRST 

coverage, FIRST in total audience and FIRST in the popularity of 

personalities. 

1 Let WBZ + WBZA's popular personalities sell for you. Call Bill William- 

fcn, WBZ + WBZA Sales Manager, ALgonquin 4-5670; or Eldon Campbell, 

^C National Sales Manager, at MUrray Hill 7-0808, New York. 

»'v. l 4 hour total cumulative audience April Nielsen Station Index tApril Nielsen Station Index 



Spot radio 



Program, sales services 

Q. Is there anything new among 
radio program and sales services? 

A. The radio program and sales 
services have been coming up with new 
schemes for selling radio and keep 
providing stations with new programs, 
new jingles, new sales aids. World 
Broadcasting, RCA Thesaurus and 
Lang-Worth all report new efforts 
toward sparking radio business, pres- 
tige and enthusiasm. 

World is currently involved in its 
biggest radio promotional effort to 
dale. Its "Radio's Big Little Man" 
campaign which will get underway 
this fall represents an aggregate invest- 
ment of $1,500,000. Since announcing 
this plan at the NARTB convention, 
World reports that 54 new stations 
have joined its roster (of over 1,000 
stations). 

The promotion is designed to turn 
a big spotlight on radio, to give radio 
stations something exciting with which 
to call attention to themselves. It 
revolves around a national contest to 
name Radio's Big Little Man (visually 
represented with the face of a baby 
and the body of a strong man flexing 
his muscles). Stations will conduct 
the contest in their areas. World will 
supply them with extensive promo- 
tional and merchandising material 
(via an expanded field staff) to help 
in the ballyhoo and to aid tie-ins with 
advertisers. Prizes feature "dream 
trips" to Paris, the Virgin Islands, 
Bermuda, in addition to hosts of other 
awards. 

The Big Little Man is being used 
now as a symbol of radio by World 
stations. 

This is the type of promotion no 
station alone can do, says World, and 
the stations are quite excited about it. 
Advertisers tying in with it are prac- 
tically guaranteed upped store traffic 
and sales volume. 

In June, World released to its sta- 
tions a package of Radio Public Pro- 
motion Songs — sixteen 20-second 
musical transcriptions calling atten- 
tion to the services radio offers every 
day — news, sports, weather, time, 
music, mystery shows, other programs 
and services people tend to take for 
granted. Stations report people are 
already humming the catchy tunes. 

Pierre Weis, general manager of 
World, states his belief that, "Radio 
will go forward if the industry is 
willing to invest in its future unlimited 

160 




Trails 



Hotr»e 



di*"* 1 "!*^ 



GET 






.e.tle-^^^ oU , s ou reap a e 8°° u3 * W» 

ccs3 , ilVBrttaO na as3 ure Y° u 

future » u a;.„ n3&«- 
fateful P-"° 



jiana^f r ' 



SI eSH*? 



Buy any 2 of these stations and get a C% discom 



» and best of all m 

Buy any 3 or 4 of these stations and get a 1 ft c 



WING PWCOL 



DAYTON 



COLUMBUS 



WIZE 

SPRINGFIELD 
SPONSOR 



**lt<il rmliit 




ETWORK. 



Whei 



good 



in you sow on good soil, you reap a 
good harvest. The advertising coverage you 
have given us on Town View has borne tremendous 
results. A total of 98 sales for one week has both over- 
whelmed and pleased us . . . 



$1,100,000 in SALES 

for an investment of $500! 



buy Air Trails Network Stations write, wire or phone collect 



Any 

H-R Representatives 

Office 

N. w York • Chicago 
Los Angeles * San Francisco 



Pat Williams 
WING 



12 1 N. Main St. 
Dayton, Ohio * Hemlock 3773 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




ATN 



ASHUNO . HUNTINGTON • IRONTOM 

11 JULY 1955 



Air Trails N 



RAILS NETWORK 



■■ill. I hi , ii . on i 

revolution u ind \\ orld 

i I'l-'l to light the fu 

RCA l i ..-,.,■ . 
Sambrook, ■ 

Program services, thai it i 
• N telling .ml- to 
than evei before. I arlj in \;nl. it 
launched it- ln-i lull -. ale |,,. 
promotion plan. Based on the theme 
"Shop .it the Store with the Miki 
the Door," it enables radio il 
offei sponsors an integrated advertis- 
ing, promotion and merchandi 
program to help stimulate bush 
Sponsors are supplied with plentiful 
'"•hi matei ial including an eye-cab h- 
ing red-and-gold dei al -In. win- .. radio 
mike to put on their dooi or window 
identifying them as a business offer- 
ing "quality, value and ~<-r \ i- • 
"Shop at the Store" slogan is plu 
"ii the air b) big name Btars, remind- 
ing listeners to look for thai emblem 
when the) -Imp. 

U>out a month after this plan was 
launched, an estimated 37,500 stores 
were displaying the emblem and the 
promotion is still going strong, - 
RCA. 

Thesaurus is celebrating it- 20th 
anniversar) tlii- year. To mark the 
occasion, it has introduced seven new 
program features this year, Beveral of 
them departures from the primarily- 
music shows Thesauru> li.i- emphasized 
in the past. Three are fully-recorded 
programs: The (, run/Ian,/ Rice Story; 
The Frank Luther r tin Show, and 
Great Days We Honor, a series f"r 
broadcast on religious and patriotic 
holidays. Do-It-Y our self is a quarter 
limir series designed to help stations 
< ash in on that $6 billion Geld. '/ eeifc- 
end Shoppers Special i- designed f<>r 
participating advertisers who want to 
hit the week-end »lmpper: Presenting 
the Statesman Quartet featurt - 
singing; Concert in the Park run- the 
gamut of com ert iiiu-i. . 

Lan^j-W orth indicati era] up- 

beal in business. < . • ). I inglois, pi 
dent of Lang-Worth, states that sta- 
tion- report enthusiastii i 
local advertisers of that compai 
new copyrighted customized commer- 
cial -i'n \- e. Their affiliates bo tired 

I 1,000,000 in new |.x al busi 

during l'»")i through the use of I 

Worth commercial feature-, indicates 
Langloi-. (),,e 250-watt station, he 
says, reported that their new <ellin_' 
-er\ ii-e had been responsible for 
,000 in new business, 

161 



Spat radio 




Transcribed shows 

Q. What's new in the tran- 
scribed radio program field? 

A. According to the transcription 
firms, their shows are heing welcomed 
by more stations and advertisers than 
ever before. The Frederic W. Ziv Co. 
reports program sales have reached a 
new high this \ear, are currently in 
800 markets in the U.S. and Canada, 
according to Alvin E. Lnger, v. p. 
charge sales. RCA Recorded Program 
Services notes continuing activity in 
sales of its 24 show series, especially 
its soap operas (Dr. Paul, Aunt Mary, 
Betty and Bob) ; just recently, for in- 
stance, RCA sold all three of them to 
the entire Columbia Pacific Radio Net- 
work, a group of 23 stations. Harry 
S. Goodman reports volume in pro- 
grams sold up around 40 r /c since last 
year and large program package sales 
to stations. 

Ziv this year enlarged its field sales 
force to increase merchandising help 
to advertisers and show them how ra- 
dio can help them make money. Lnger 
points to a continuation of the trend 
toward sale of complete programs to 
advertisers rather than participations. 

Heading Ziv's sales list are The 
Eddie Cantor Show, launched last fall, 
Mr. District Attorney, I Was a Com- 
munist for the FBI, Cisco Kid, Boston 
Blachie, Philo Vance. A new show is 
in the works for the fall. 

Grocery chains and independents, 
food products, banks, automotive cli- 
ents, appliance distributors are promi- 
nent among transcribed show spon- 
sors. 

"'Very bullish" is the way Everett 
Goodman, v.p. in charge of sales for 
Goodman, says he feels about radio, 
and tells why : '"We are finding that 
many stations we approach are com- 
pletely sold out in time. One station 
sales manager I met at the NARTB 
convention told me business is so good 
that they have a waiting list and were 
going to raise their rates 2r> c /c. And 
sure enough, thev did!" 



Farm radio 



Q. How important is radio to 
the farmer? 

A. Farm families tune in radio more 
frequently than the average U.S. fami- 
ly, both day and night, according to 
recent survevs. They spend 24 r r more 
hours per dav with radio than do peo- 



162 



SPONSOR 



*>//nf radio 



pie in urban areas I \. < Nielsen, MM 
March-April 1954). Farmers' program 
preferero es i on i" newa and market 
reports, musical shows (especial!) !"lk 
music), religious programs. 
The Buyers' Guide notes thai 70^i 

uf tin- —till i»»ti— li-lcil s< hedule some 

farm programing each week a w ii < >[>- 
ping 1,531 stations. Of these, 679 pro- 
gram five or more hours per week to 

I hi ' la I III .lllcllrli. r. 

Farm households, <>f which there 
are about •">'■_> million, comprise nearl) 
l.'V, of all households in the country. 
\lidiit 98% oi these homes have one 
or more radio-; more than 7595 are 
multiple-set homes. I For Further facts 

on the farm market. Bee SPONSOR'S 
Farm Radio-TV Section. I \'<>veml>ei 
1954 issue.) 



Q. How can radio advertisers 
best sell to farmers? 
A. Veteran radio-tv farm directors 
give the following tips to advertisers: 

Be consistent farmers are not im- 
pulse buyers, must be cultivated. Stud) 
the farmer's needs, stress "use" \alue 

of goods. Don't *"-li< k up" \our mes- 
sage, preferabl) let talent ad lib from 
fact sheets. Tie in dealers. Use testi- 
monial-, if possible recorded comments 
from farmers or farm wives about 
\our product. Keep Belling in step with 
changes in farm market, avoid "na- 
tional"" pitch. 



Folk music 

Q. How large a following does 
folk music programing have? 
A. Large enough to warrant being 
regularK scheduled on nearly 1,700 
radio stations I representing 77' r of 
all respondents to SPONSOR^ 1955 
Buyers' Guide to Station Programing i ; 
and A l )V> of these stations program 20 
hours or more of folk music. 

The appeal of folk music I sometime- 
called Western or hillhilh I continues 
strong and will probably never wane 
because it is an expression of a basic 
spirit, opines one veteran Midwest 
broadcaster. It is not contrived, 
rather springs from a friendly and 
informal wa\ of living. Sa\s he: "You 
can't do a square dance in full dress 
evening clothes." 

\\ hich may explain why folk music- 
is most popular where evening clothes 
are worn least: in the South. Mid- 
west and Far \\ est. Three stations told 



lorning, Noon and Nightime, too ! 
"" "' ">o the Whole Day Through 







9 




EARLY: 

More than half of Syracuse's vast industrial work- 
er population goes t° work before 7:30. From sign 
on until he talks them right to their factory bench, 
E<) Kaish is selling them his sponsors' goods and 



MORNING: 

. . . and at that point, Denny Sullivan takes over 
to entertain and keep time for the Syracuse whiih 
is up to get breakfast, go to work, go to school, or 
do the dishes . . . it's not just habit that they buy 
the products he recommends. No! He sells 'em. 



AFTERNOON: 

Names make news and friends. Bill Thorpe uses 
names, and clubs; births and special events; public 
interests; and he laces them with Syracuse's favor- 
ite afternoon music. That's why people listen. 
That's when he sells them his sponsor's favorite 
products. 



NIGHT: 

Bob [ves builds confidence with good music; hai 
15 years ol ' radio know how" . . . with B ol those 
years as an evening announce! on VVTB1 His 
velvet-tipped \<>i<t helps make buying plans i"r 
ihis i)iis\ area thittughoul ih< week 



itus iiiis\ area mm 

You Can Buy Them in Combination 

0N , wrtiSBS 




• WFBL has been 
S\rac use's 
Sumber One 

radio station 
s,nce 1922 



11 JULY 1955 



163 



Spot radio 



DOUBLE 

YOUR QUAD-CITY 

COVERAGE 

With 

KSTT 



The Quad-Cities {Daven- 
port, Iowa; Rock Island, 
Moline, East Moline, Il- 
linois) represent only 
half the Quad-City trad- 
ing area. KSTT covers 
both the metropolitan 
area and the entire 14 
county trading area. 
Davenport retail stores 
buy KSTT an hour ev- 
ery day to promote shop- 
ping outside the Quad- 
Cities, proof that KSTT 
is the choice for both 
halves of the Quad-City 
area. Your Walker rep- 
resentative has all the 
impressive story. 

KSTT 

Davenport, Iowa 

1170 Kc 

Represented by 
The Walker Company 



Buyers' Guide they program nothing 
hut folk music: KXLA, Pasadena; 
WCMS, Norfolk; WFPA, Fort Payne, 
Ala. Many others reported heavv 
folk schedules of 40 to 60 hours a 
week. (For a detailed roundup of this 
type of programing — stations, audi- 
ences, costs, sponsors — see "Why 
sponsors hate to leave the barn dance," 
SPONSOR, 3 May 1954, page 42.) 

A long list of both consumer and 
farm-product sponsors swing along 
with folk shows. The roster includes 
names like Miles Labs, Bristol-Myers, 
Phillips Petroleum, d-Con insecticide, 
R. J. Reynolds, Kingan Meats, Warren 
Paints, St. Joseph's Aspirin, Holmes 
Bread. 



Foreign language 

Q. How extensive is foreign- 
language radio? 

A. It is possible to tune broadcasts 
on U.S. radio stations in* 38 different 
languages, according to sponsor's 1955 
Buyers' Guide; 369 stations program 
for one or more foreign-speaking seg- 
ments in their communities (this does 
not include most Mexican-Spanish sta- 
tions, dealt with separately below). 



One interesting trend noted is that 
stations, to keep up with the increasing 
Americanization of foreigners, now 
frequently divide their foreign-language 
programs into two categories: one 
entirely in that language to appeal to 
the foreign-born and naturalized; the 
other largely in English for the more 
integrated listeners but with the flavor 
and spirit of that foreign segment. 

Q. Where are the major foreign 
markets? 

A. The older urban manufacturing 
centers are still the chief foreign mar- 
kets. Some idea of where the greatest 
concentrations of foreign-speaking 
peoples are can be had from this run- 
down of the states leading in number 
of stations with foreign programing: 
New York, 36 stations; Pennsylvania, 
35; California, 32; Massachusetts, 25; 



Ohio, 18; Michigan, 16; 
16; Connecticut, 14. 



W 



Mexican-American 

Q. What is the Mexican-Ameri- 
can market? 

A. The Mexican-American market is 
made up of some three million Spanish 




If you want to 

know about the 

lowest cost per M 

buy in Miami — 

just call your 

Hollingbery man! 



James M. LeGate, General Manager 

5,000 WATTS • 610 KC ■ NBC Affiliate 

National Rep., George P. Hollingbery Co. 




164 



SPONSOR 



S/„,/ null, i 



■peaking people living in the Sooth' 
west I .S. in Texas, California, 

Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado. 
Tin's an- a permanent population en- 
gaged in about as wide a variety of 

occupation-, a- other segments of the 
population in tli.it area: I he\ are 
farmers, factor) -workers, sales clerks, 
storekeepers, ami also doctors, lawyers 
ami teachers. I lie "wetbacks" <>r 
migrant farmer- who seasonally cross 

tile border from Mexico w lien there is 
w i . t k for them and then ^o l>a< k. an' 
not included in the three million total. 

This Spanish-speaking market is one 

of two in the I .S. The other i> made 

up of the Puerto Ricans who have been 
flocking into the country and who are 
concentrated in New York City. They, 
too. comprise a live and growing 

market. 



Q. Is the Mexican - American 
market a new one? 
A. Since Spanish-speaking peoples 
have been living in the Southwest I .8. 

for at least 300 years, they do not 

exactly comprise a "new" market. 
However, very little effort w.i- made 
to cultivate this market In air adver- 
ti-eis till about five years ago. Pioneer 
was Harlan G. Oakes, a radio rep on 
the West Coast who -aw untapped pos- 
sibilities in the market and launched a 
promotional and -ale- effort in l').iO. 
Since then two rep organizations have 
come into existence devoted entirely 
to Spanish radio Richard O'Connell 
Inc. ami National Time Sales. 



Q. Has interest in the Mexican- 
American market been growing? 
A. Its been snowballing, according 
to both* Richard O'Connell and Na- 
tional Time Sales' sales manager, 
Arthur Gordon, who sa\s: "Business 
is definitely up! More and more new 
accounts are coining in and many old 
accounts are expanding. The prospects 
are terrific!" 

Since last year. O'Connell has or- 
ganized the 10 Spanish-language sta- 
tions he represents into a network 
called the Sombrero Network; he 
issued the first rate card in December 
1954 Stations in the web are: KCOR. 
San \ntoni,,: kf.BT. Harlitmen. Tex.: 
KTXN, \ustin: KCCTj Corpus Christi; 
XKLO. Juarez-El Paso; XEDF, Nuevo 
Laredo. Mex.: KWKW, Pasadena: 
KLOK. San Jose: K \B0. Albuquerque, 
N. M.: and WHOM New York. \d- 



Big Aggie makes a 
winning move for 

RALSTON PURINA 




in the land where TV means "Taint Visible" 



Selling feeds in vast, 5-state Big Aggie Land 
is no parlor game. But WNAX-5 70 has the 
winning system. Take Ralston Purina Feeds 
in the Checkerboard Bag for example. 




Big Aggie Farm Service Editor 
Chet Randolph airs a 20-minute 
show for Purina 3 days a week, but 
his promotion doesn't end there. 
Chet jumps all over Big Aggie 
Land promoting Purina. He picks 
up Purina success stories and 
makes powerful "local proof" com- 
mercials of them ... he tells 
Purina dealers how the other guy 




is doing it with regular, personal 
letters ... he shows up at every 
major farm show and exhibit to 
put his popular standing with farm- 
ers behind Purina Feeds. 

It's WNAX-570*s personal interest 
that clears the board for Purina. 
And if you'd like Big Aggie on 
your side, your Katz man can 
arrange it. 



WNAX-570 



YANKTON, SOUTH DAKOTA 

A Cowlet Station • CBS Radio 

Don D. Sullivan, Ad»ertiiinq. Director. 
Under the lame management at KVTV 
Channel ?. Sioui City: logo's second 
largest market. 



11 JULY 1955 



165 



Spot radio 




NEW CONSTRUCTION 

AT FANTASTIC CLIP 

IN WREN'S BACKYARD! 

Just to give you an idea of the 
booming Topeka market — take a 
gander at these figures on con- 
struction now underway in Shaw- 
nee county alone: 

Project Cost 

New Veteran's Hospital 21-million 
New State Office Building 9-million 
Forbes Air Base Run-Way 10-million 
Kansas Turnpike 8 3 /t-million* 

'(Engineers estimate on Shawnee 
County's share of 160-million total 
for the turnpike) 

Needless to say this leaves out "trifles" 
like a new million and one-half dollar 
parking lot, a 5-million dollar real estate 
development by one private builder and 
more than ten buildings in the under I- 
million classl Why not ask your John E. 
Pearson man for a really conclusive re- 
port on the Topeka market, and why you 
can't cover it effectively without WREN I 




5000 WATTS • ABC 
TOPEKA. KANSAS 



vertisers ma\ buy all the stations or 
groups of three or more. 

O'Connell reports that 15 to 20 new 
advertisers have bought into the 
Sombrero network since last December. 

Come fall. National Time Sales will 
sell its 13 stations in Texas, California, 
Arizona — and Chicago — as a complete 
package, too. The National Spanish 
Network, as it will be called will 
include those stations now comprising 
the Texas Spanish Language Network 
(KIWW, XEO-XEOR, XEJ) and the 
Mexican Quality Network (KALI, 
XEAC, XED I , plus others repped by 
National Time Sales. 

An advertiser wishing to reach the 
Spanish-speaking Mexican- American 
actually has 139 radio stations from 
which to choose; this was the number 
of stations reporting programing, either 
in Spanish or English, directed to this 
audience, according to sponsor's 1955 
Buyers' Guide. Of these stations, 56 
are in Texas, 51 in California. 

Another indication of the strength 
of this market is the fact that there 
are now two all-Spanish tv stations 
programing to this audience. XEJ-TV, 
covering Juarez-El Paso has been in 
operation since mid-1954; KCOR-TV, 
San Antonio, started last month. Be- 
fore the end of the year, XEFE-TV in 
Nuevo Laredo, which is now testing, 
is expected to be under way. 



Q. What programs do the Mexi- 
can-Americans prefer? 

A. In addition to music — preferably 
the strong Latin rhythms — this audi- 
ence seems to go for soap operas, 
homemaking shows and personality 
programs. Some stations, such as 
XEJ. offer 14 or 15 soaps a day — most 
with "blood and guts" realism and 
down-to-earth emotional appeal. For 
home shows. Club del Hogar I The 
Home Club) seems to be a listener- 
attracting name; it is used for pro- 
grams of this type by many stations. 
Most personalities are women and 
the bulk of the Mexican-American 
radio audience is composed of women. 
And of course most advertisers accord- 
ingly aim their products and commer- 
cials at the Mexican-American women. 



Q. Which advertisers are using 
radio to reach Mexican - Ameri- 
cans? 

A. Soap and detergent, beer and 
food (especially baking product) ad- 
vertisers are probablv the largest 



RIGHT! says Pall Mall 
RIGHT! saysSchlitz 
KlU HI I says Fels Naptha 

nlUn I i says Anacin 

DIHUTT says Standard Oil 
mum i of Indiana 

DIPUTI say these blue chip 
niUM I i local advertisers: 

Carpenter Baking Co. 

Luick Sealtest 

Boston Store 

First Wisconsin National Bank 

Graf's Beverages 



MATCH THIS COST! 



ItlYii per 1000 homes based 
on 156 time National Rate 



MATCH THIS COVERAGE 



54% of population in 
Wealthy Wisconsin 

Make the shrewd I buy . 



1000 watts at 920 
24 Hours a Day 



National Representative: 
THE BOLLING COMPANY, INC. 



166 



SPONSOR 



*ipot null.' 



i ategoi \ea in Spanish radio. I aUtaff, 
Rheingold and Hamm'a are among th<- 
been; I ide and Cheer among the 
detergents; Gold Medal Flour, Calumet 
Baking Powdei and Fluffo, a new 
I'M. shortening, are three of the 
baking products. Two "I the l>i 
Spanish-language advertisers are Car- 
nation and Pel evaporated milk~. w In > 
use more than one Spanish station in 
a market New advertisers include 
such accounts a- Ex-Las (which uses 
early-morning announcements on tin' 
Sombrero stations to reach a male 
audience); Armstrong (!<>rk. for in- 
expensive linoleum; Lydia Pinkham. 



KHigious ami jjospH 

Q. How many stations put on 
religious gospel shows? 
A. According t<> sponsor's L955 
Buyers' Guide, religious and gospel 
shows are increasing faster than an} 
other category. Of the 2.172 radio 
station respondents thi> year, J5.V '< re- 
port some programing oi tlii* t \ pe as 
against 54' ' '< of the stations responding 
last year. Stations scheduling 10 hours 
or more of religious programing rose 
from 100 i(»'; i in L954 to 373 1 17$ I 
in 1955. About I"'; of those stations 
featuring this t\pe of programing are 
also Negro-appeal outlets. 



Concert music 

Q. To what extent do stations 
program concert music? 
A. Of the stations responding to 
sponsor's Buyers' Guide. 1.(><!1. or 
7!')' i , regularly schedule concert 
music, either light orchestral or 
classical: -1-1' '< feature light concert 
music predominantly. Stations now 
scheduling 10 hours or more a week 
in this category amount to 23$ of the 
total respondents thi~ year, a consider- 
ate rise from the 9$ doing so in 
sponsor's 1954 survey. 



Q. How popular is concert mu- 
sic? 

A. Quite popular, and growing from 
all indications. According to Good 
Music Broadcasters Inc.. which repre- 
sents 11 stations specializing in con- 
cert music programing. 35 million 
Americans spend more than $50 mil- 
lion for admissions to good music 
events yearly. 




FACTS 



Buffalo- Niagara Falls 
is the nation's 14-th 
largest market. 

WGR-TV completely 
dominates * this rich 
market, serving 447,938 
U. S. sets and a bonus 
of 407,619 in Canada. 






Ater 




Channel 2 

Buffalo's favorite station 



representatives — Headley-Reed 

In Canada — Andy McDermott-Toronto 



WGR-TV leads in 21 of the 24 weekday quarter-hour 
segments between 6 PM and midnight. (Pulse) 



11 JULY 1955 



167 



Spot radio 



MORE 

THAN ANY 
STATION WEST 
OF THE ROCKIES 



Yes . . . more 
sepia program 
than ANY sta- 
tion west of the 
Rockies! 

Full 95% Negro 
programing dom- 
inating the 165, 
000 bay area Ne- 
gro mkt. — with 
purchasing power 
in excess of ONE MILLION DOLLARS 
A DAY! 



Featuring the 
famous person- 
alities of Jumpin' 
George, Jackie 






Ford, Wally Ray, 
Honeyboy Hardy 
— and their loyal 
following . . mean 




MORE DOLLARS 
FOR YOU! 




1355 MARKET STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



"Our stations have experienced an 
average total audience increase of 
11% over last year," says Dorothy J. 
Wall, head of GMBs New York office. 
"And our biggest audience increases 
have been in prime tv evening time." 
CMB reports the weekly audience for 
its stations standing at about two mil- 
lion families; and these families listen 
an average of three hours a day, says 
GMB. 

Fm rad io 

Q. What is the status of fm? 

A. As of 1 June, 540 fm stations 
were in operation. According to a sur- 
vey made by Politz in November 
1954, Americans owned 11,210,000 
fm-equipped sets and 21.6% of Amer- 
ica's radio households had fm recep- 
tion. However, the penetration of fm 
is not evently distributed (several 
states have no fm stations at all ) ; fm 
tends to be more heavily concentrated 
in major metropolitan markets. In 
New York City, for instance, a Pulse 
study showed a 53.7% penetration of 
fm among 2,100 homes selected as 
an economic cross-section ( January 
1955). 



Q. What is the outlook for fm? 

A. Fm men are taking new hope for 
the future from two developments: 
multiplexing and hi-fi. 

As of 1 July, the FCC authorized 
the practice of multiplexing by fm sta- 
tions. This is a means of broadcast- 
ing two signals simultaneously on the 
same channel; it enables an fm station 
to use part of its facilities for beam- 
ing background music to restaurants 
and stores on a subscription basis and 
another part for regular "home" 
broadcasting, available to advertisers. 
Naturally, such an arrangement offers 
new economic promise to fm station 
operators I That multiplexing works 
was proven by WGHF, New York, 
which has conducted successful experi- 
ments for over a year.) 

Multiplexing equipment will prob- 
ably be available by August, according 
to one trade source. It remains to be 
seen how quickly fm stations will equip 
themselves with it. 

Hi-fi and fm are really first cousins. 
To most hi-fi aficionados, an fm or 
fm-am tuner is an indispensable part 
of their hi-fi-rigs. The fact that the 
hi-fi market continues virile and grow- 
ing is encouraging for fm stations. 



WKOW Couatoy... 



Bigger than St. Louis! 

The 50 county market covered by Wis- 
consin's most powerful radio station is 
bigger than St. Louis in retail sales, 
more than twice as big as Milwaukee. 
Like these metropolitan areas, wKOW 
COUNTBY is a group of shopping cen- 
ters. Unlike them, however, the land 
between one rich wKOW COUNTRY 
shopping area and the next produces 
valuable farm products and an aver- 
age annual family income of $6,921 
for the producers. Madison, the capital 
of wKOW COUNTRY, with over 
105,000 population, has an average 
spendable income per household of 
$8,067. You can sell it all at bargain 
rates on WKOW at one-fifth the mice 
you pay for St. Louis, one-half the 
price for Milwaukee. 




WKOW 

MADISON, WIS. 



CBS 

Affiliate 



Represented by 

HEADLEY REED CO. 



168 



SPONSOR 



N//(»/ radio 



\ i Hi- in mIii ill hi radio 

Q. How much of an audience is 
there for radio after midnight? 
A. Evidence thai i' is substantial 
i> afforded l>\ the fad dial I T of the 
station respondents to the 1955 Buyers 
Guide reported programing past 12 
midnight .1 total oJ 332 stations. I >i 
these, 106 -i t\ on the ail 2 I hours. 



Q. What sponsors use radio in 
the wee hours? 

A. American Airlines is one "I the 
more prominent and consistent users 
of post-midnight radio; it sponsors a 
12 midnight-to-5 :30 ajn. program, 
[fusic Till Down, on nine major radio 
stations. The show was launched in 
\|iril 1953 on -i\ CBS stations: 
W( BS, \,<* York; \\ BBM, Chicago; 
KNX, LA.; Will. Boston; WTOP, 
Washington, D.C.; KCBS, S.F. Re- 
centlj American Urlines added three 
more: KRLD, Dallas; WW J. Detroit: 
W I W . Cincinnati. 

Riese nine stations, says Ernest 
Hartniaii. director of radio and t\ for 

American Urlines at Lennen & Newell, 
cam the program t<> everj state of t In- 
union as evidenced bj mail response. 

I he big unsolicited mail pull, plus 
public reaction. plus actual statements 
made 1>\ people buying tickets all add 

ii|i to belief l>\ (lie sponsor that the 

show is bringing results. "In our mail 

-all unsolicited 27', of those 

writing make a favorable reference to 

the sponsor." -a\s Mailman. The show 
features music ranging from instru- 
mental pop to the hea\ \ <lassics. The 

audience is composed largely of house- 
wives, professional people, shut-ins and 
students, according to Hartman. 

Another indication that post-mid- 
night programs are picked up by 
listener- far and wide comes from 
Max Buck, director of advertising, 
merchandising and promotion of 
WI!C\ and WRCA-TV, New ^ ..rk. He 
reports that WRCA's Music Through 
the Sight I 12:30 to 6:00 a.m. i gets 
letters from listeners as far awa\ as 
Hudson s Ba\ and. in the other direc- 
tion. Florida to sa\ nothing of ship.* 
at sea. All types of listeners respond. 
including night truckmen who listen 
while the\ drive. The program features 
"medium to long-hairish" music. 
Regent cigarettes is the biggest single 
sponsor on the show, bankrolls it two 
and one half nights a week on WRC V 
Other aiKertisers like Ronzoni and 
Simon ^ Sinister bu\ announcements. 



now 



in 



proof positive 

WCUE 
FIRST 
AKRON 



latest 
Hooper 
ratings 

M.irch-April 
1965 



SHARE OF Mon. thru Fri. 
RADIO AUDIENCE 800 A.M. -12 Noon 


Mon thru Fri 
12 Noon 6:00 P.M. 


WCUE 32.2 


32.7 


Station B 


29.5 


28.3 


Station C 


27.0 


21.6 


Station D 


4.2 


9.3 



\nl C'lM* • • • Akron's only Independent— we're home folks. 

TIM ELLIOT, President 

John E. Pearson Co., Notional Representatives 




// your prodiu ts 
are sold in gTOi i 
and drug stoics (and 
these days what isn't 
consider this fact: In 
Vancouver the big food 

(hams like SAFEWAY 
b & k and SUPER -VALU. 
anil the CUNNINGHAM 

and owl drug chains, 
all choose CKWX for 
day-to-day radio setting. 

Lost year, chain Sto 
placed seven times ,•< 
business on CKV) X 
than the \ca> before! 
How's that fen chain 
reaction: 

reps: All-Canada 

Radio Facilities Limited 
Weed & Company 

RADIO VANCOUVER 



11 JULY 1955 



169 



NETWORK RADIO 

• Single-sponsored half-hour show is vanishing from network. In the 
future practically all purchases will be on the announcement level 

• Current trend to the single rate is temporary. Eventually day rates 
will be double those at night, a eomplete reversal of the past 

• There will be no sudden revamping in the way radio networks operate. 
\\ ebe will continue to program, sell time, share proceeds with affiliates 

• Webs may provide more programing for affiliates to sell locally, in 
either station or network option time. In return for these shows, affiliates 
would get less money from the webs for network sales. This would 
enable the networks to sell announcements at a cheaper price 

• Two contrary programing trends will continue to dominate web radio 
in future. These are: more strips at night, more multi-hour programs 



Buying patterns 

Q. What are the outstanding fea- 
tures of network radio buying this 
fall? 

A. Above all. flexibility. This flexi- 
bility takes various forms: 

1. Flexibility in the size of an- 
nouncements, especially in lengths 
shorter than a minute. Both Mutual, 
through its participation programs, 
and NBC. via Monitor, sell announce- 
ments as short as six-second "bill- 
boards." 

2. Flexibility in network lineups. 
Both ABC and CBS are pushing the 
sale of regional networks. Even with- 
in the regional network structure, how- 
ever, there is flexibility in the choice 
of stations. Mutual will sell almost 
any network that can be conveniently 
tied together with lines. NBC contin- 
ues its formula of no must-buy sta- 
tions but requires a minimum buy 
equal to at least 75% of the gross cost 
of the full network. 

3. Flexibility in terms of "scatter 
Inning." There are more ways of buy- 
ing network radio these days. One 
reason, <>f course, is that there is more 



time to buy, but the networks in addi- 
tion are offering a variety of induce- 
ments, such as contiguous rates, for 
buying combinations of time. Although 
the networks don't like to mention the 
word "announcements/" what they are 
doing more and more, in effect, is 
selling units of commercial time with- 
in programs rather than selling pro- 
grams themselves in which advertisers 
place their own commercial time. 

Monitor is an outstanding example 
of this and MBS is carrying the scat- 
ter concept to new heights in its run- 
of-schedule plan I explained in detail 
later). Scatter buying is also done via 
packages of five-minute news shows, 
dispersed throughout the week and 
weekend. While these involve "full" 
sponsorship, single-show sponsorship 
is not what it once was. 

The decline of single-show sponsor- 
ship in the traditional half-hour once- 
a-week pattern is nowhere so evident 
as at night. The trend at night is to- 
ward buying of weekday strips, both 
five- and 15-minutes. with some adver- 
tisers buying the complete strip and 
others buying part. Other kinds of 
multiple-show buying are also evident. 



Q. Is this nighttime strip trend 
a sudden development? 
A. Multiple show and strip buying 
got underway in earnest during the 
past season and proved to be one of 
the answers to selling nighttime net- 
work radio. For this coming season 
the pattern has been more or less per- 
manently nailed down. 

A glance at the weekdav nighttime 
network sponsorship picture this past 
April shows how far this buying pat- 
tern has developed. Here s a summary: 

ABC: Of seven nighttime sponsors. 
fi\e had strips. Of the five, three had 
15-minute strips, one (General Mills I 
had two half-hour shows alternating 
in the 7:30-7:55 slot five days a week 
and one (Aero-Mayflower) had three 
five-minute news shows dailv in the 
same slots Tuesdays through Friday s. 
Of the non-strip sponsors, the Chris- 
tian Science Monitor bought a single 
five-minute news analysis show but its 
show was part of the 9:25-9:30 news 
strip during the week. Only the Voice 
of Firestone could be said to represent 
the traditional single weekly show 
sponsorship pattern and even here 
there is some question of "tradition" 



170 



SPONSOR 



since the show is .1 simulcast. 

h i- interesting t" note thai though 
\i:» will have two new single-show 
sponsors in the fall, l"'ili sponsorships 
are, like !• irestone, adjun* 1- ol i\ ad- 
vertising. The two new sponsors are 
Pabsl and Admiral. I ^« * 1 1 1 have come 
ovei i" UJC as pari ol .1 -liift in t\ 
networks. The Pabsl fights were shift- 
ed From CBS l\ to \B» l\ and Ad- 
miral brought over Bishop Sheen From 
Du M«>iit to \BC T\ . However, it is 
significant that radio versions oi the 
fights and Bishop Sheen were not on 
am last season but \mII I"' this com- 
ing season. The fights will be on I 11 

or L5 minute- after the t\ show (via 

tape 1 hut the Bishop Sheen radio lec- 
tures will differ from the t\ program. 

CHS: Of 11 sponsors, II bought into 
-ti ips one ui more da) b. I be excep- 
tions: Lipton's sponsorship oi trthur 
Godfrey's Talent Scouts, a Bimulcast; 
Bristol-Myers 1 sponsorship oi the Ir- 
thur Godfrey Digest, which is taped 
from a simulcast and Wrigley's spon- 
sorship of FBI in Peace and U <ir. The 
latter two Bhows arc 25 minutes each. 

ytHS: ill, iv were no single half-hour 
sponsorships. Of the I 11 sponsors, two 



bought into shows on 1 single night. 
Bankei - I >ife 8 ' asualtj bought 
hi id I leattei one night .1 week but the 
news -how 1- .1 strip. Sleep I it bought 
one parti< ipation on I 1 ida) night in 
the \lulii \h sa ige Plan, whw h 1- 1 
half-how strip oi five different m) - 
terj -how- in the same slot Half of 
Mutual- nighttime weekdaj clients are 
\l\ll' sponsors, hut none has one 01 
these -how- to itself. 

%BCt ()iiU mi NBC was there 1 sub- 
stantial numbei oi single Bhow spon- 
sorships. Tin- total in \ J » r i 1 was I 11 
Bingle-show sponsorships and nine mul- 
tiple or strip Bhow sponsorships. Ml 
of the single -how-, with the possible 
exception of l.t<\ Radio Theatre ma) 

be back in the fall but then- is a g I 

possibility the) will be grouped to- 
gether to make the room foi -ti ips. 



Q. What's the reason behind 
these evolving buying patterns? 
A. Advertisers are less interested in 
buying program identification and 
more interested in buying sheer cir- 
■ ulaiion. Basically, this change has 
come about as a result of tv with rat- 
ings going down in an\ one particular 
time segment but w i t li the cross vol- 



ume of radio I 

w hat with mull] -i'i In 

i"i tli. I " captun 

hi Zed .nidi. 1 
into "-• ill. 1 

attention to cumulative audien • -. In 

nihil words, the emphasis on 

ing radio audit 1 ■ 

the Bingle-show 1 the total 

diem e ovei a pei iod ol time, usu 

one week 01 foui weeks. 



Q. Is the aim of cumulative ,iu 
dience buying to get as high a total 
audience as possible? 
A. Generally, yes. Ml adverti 
ti \ to get as big an audien* e for theii 
commercials as possible. However, in 
buj ing < 11 riiul.it i\ 1- audieix es two 
are a< tuall) discernible. ' me i- t" 
1 • . i • li .1- man; different homes .1- pos- 
sible and the othei 1- to bit ea< h I 
as man) times as possible. 

\' tuall) what the advertisei buj - 
i- home-impressions. I 01 example, 
let's -a\ a -pon-or buys a group 
news Bhows and let's -a\ all these 
-how- add up to .1 total numbei ■•( |n 
million impressions in four weeks. 
1 Mi impression is one home rea< bed 
one time. > In illu-ti ate m hat these I" 
million impressions mean in tern - 



New "Woolworth Hour" »j- ( !?*> Radio coup but trend i- awa] 
troin such single sponsored shows. Like other webs, I H v stresses 
-irip-. Below, left to right, are producer-director Howard l>. 

Barm'-, liu-t I)iukiIiI \\ I- and musical director Perc\ Faith 



\lii Radio's weekend "Monitor" i- tailored to In current d< 
for cumulative audiences, cheap circulation. Shown discussing 
-linn liilnu are, I. to r., NB( President Pal w*i 1 1 r. Jim Fleming, 
who heads "Monitor": \B< Exec. V.P. Bob Sarnofl rrowaj 




11 JULY 1955 



171 



AV/icorfc radio 




CARTER M. PARHAM, President 



HEADS 'N 
SHOULDERS 

ABOVE THE REST! 

Top "Hooperatings" in 41 
out of a total of 62 meas- 
ured quarter hours (7:00 
a.m., - 10:30 p.m.) Mon- 
day thru Friday. See the 
January-February 1955 
Hooper Report. 

It's a TERRIFIC Story! 

AskBRANHAM! 



n A rMA NBC AFFILIATE IN 

K /\U\KJ CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 

• KEN FLENNIKEN, General Manager 



0*f, 




.MB 



AMS 



<^tifc 



U L S E 



HOOPER 



N I E L S E 



For 31 years 
WDBJ has been 
the MOST LISTENED 
TO- MOST RESULT- 
FUL RADIO STATION in 
Roanoke and Western Virginia. 

Ask Free & Peters! 



Established 1924 • CBS Since 1929 
AM • 5000 WATTS • 960 KC 
FM . 41.000 WATTS . 94.9 MC 

' ROANOKE, VA. 

Owned and Operated by the TIMES-WORLD CORPORATION 
FREE & PETERS. INC.. National Representatives 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S ftiXUtee/l RADIO STATION 



extremes, the) could mean that the 
sponsor lai reaches one million homes 
10 times each or (b) 10 million homes 
once. Since ratings are based on the 
Dumber of different homes reached this 
means that the four-week cume rating 
in the first case is only one-tenth the 
rating in the second case. But this 
does not mean that the bigger rating is 
necessarilv better. 

Of course, it never works out in 
(juite that way. It is more likely that 
it would work out to 3.3 million homes 
ieached an average of about three 
times. However, there are differences 
in frequency of listening for different 
kinds of shows. Soap operas, for ex- 
ample, generally have a higher fre- 
quency of listening than other types 
of shows. 

Therefore, when buying cumulative 
audiences, the network radio advertis- 
er should keep in mind that while to- 
; tal audience is a helpful measure of 
whom he's reaching, there's more to 
the stor\. 



Q. Is it better to get a high cu- 
mulative audience or to hit fewer 
homes more often? 

A. There is no flat answer to this. 
High frequency per home may be bet- 
ter for one purpose and high total au- 
dience may be better for another. An 
auto advertiser who wants to announce 
via teaser ads that his new model is 
on the way would want to reach a high 
total audience. If the same advertiser 
wants to explain some new shock ab- 
sorbers via radio, he would want more 
frequency of listening to his commer- 
cial because of its more complicated 
nature. 

Generall. speaking, however, adver- 
tisers use radio today to reach mass 
audiences because of radios wide 
reach. It is probablv safe to sa\. 
therefore, that most advertisers are af- 
ter a high total rating with the further 
proviso that the proportion of homes 
reached onlv once should not be too 
great. To some advertisers, thin cov- 
erage is waste coverage. 



Q. What kinds of cumulative au- 
diences will advertisers be able to 
reach via network radio this fall? 

A. While future ratings are specula- 
tive, a good idea of radios reach via 
multiple shows can be gotten through 
looking back at what advertisers have 
I racked up during the past season. 



172 



SPONSOR 



Srttciirti riiih-i 



While network ratings "ill probabl) 
l>e down this fall, the decrease is not 
expected t<> be much. 

In examining the cumulative ratings 
I. clow the precautions mentioned above 

-hoiiltl In- ki-|il in mind ami it should 

.d-<> be remembered the value "I a 
i iimc rating i- also determined l>\ the 
dollai cost in the advertiser. 

• rhis past spring Vero-Mayflowei 
bought a news package on VBC Radio 
.it nighl during the week. I In- pack- 
was three shows nightl) on four 

nights. Inial homes reached accord- 
ing to Nielsen was 8,848,000 in foui 
weeks or 18.59! t>f L7.S. radio homes. 
I hi- homes total i- roughlj equal to a 
i\ rating ol aboul 25 or more. Month- 
l\ cost to the sponsor foi this news 
package was aboul 145,000, less than 
the tinif-and-taltnt cost of a single 
half-hour t\ show. Of the total homes 
reached bj this nighttime package of 
18 shows, 3,926,000 were t\ homes. 

• I he VBC Radio weekend news 
package of 22 five-minute Bhows (the 
typical station carries 17) has been 
bought bj a variet) of clients. Cur- 
rent advertise] is lexaco. Between 
Vugusl 1953 and December 1954 the 

show averaged more than nine million 



home impressions pel weekend 

cording i" Nielsen. In June L954 I e 

impressions were broken down is fol- 
lows: 1,168,000 impressions in h 
homes and 5,"72 1,000 impressions in 
radio-onl) homes this during a sin- 
gle weekend. I In- unduplicated homes 
audience in June 1954 foi our week- 
end was 5,877,000, representing .i cu- 
mulate e i ating oi 1 2.6' - of all I 5. 
radio homes. In our month from 
June to Jul) 195 1 the pat kage 
n ,ii hed 26.9' I "I all I N . radio homes 
..I 12,548,000 homes. During this 
month each home was reached an av- 
e oi 2.8 times. I lome impressions 
ft. i the month were thus 35,134,000. 
None of these figures include out-of- 
home listening. Cost of the package 
pei week is $1 1,500 before agent j 
commission. 

• Whil. • Nielsen figures on NBC Ra- 
dio's weekend program Monitor were 
not yet out at sponsor's presstime, 
previous Nielsen figures on weekend 
listening to NBC provide a good -am- 
ple of what a Monitor client can ex- 
pect. \ "typical" 10-announcemenl 
schedule on Monitor could gel a rat- 
ing of 9.5 (or 1,357,000 homes) while 
a 15-announcement -t hedule could eel 



a 10.8 (or 4 NB< 

feels -nit the show m ill 

minute ratii 
around 700,000 homes. \t th< 
summei i :. this would 

the .ol\ • 

foi .i II > ml annount < 

foi a six-set ond billboard. \i the 

ill. ii r 1 1 < - foi thl 

•mil. in el t 1.7. whit h NB( 

feels i oiihd.nl the show h ill r< 
u ould In ing in the minute anno 
mcni .it un. I.i |l-per-l,000. 



Q. Arc there any new sales plans 
in the works for pushing network 
radio's new selling concepts? 
A. \-idc from Monitor | foi dl I 

see "Monitor: network radio's future 
I attei n . / " -i'<i\-iiit. I ; June 19 
probabl) the mosl n-\ olution 
in network radio Belling is Mm 
new run-of-schedule plan. The plan i- 
aimed ..i advertisers with saturation 
on theii min.l-. l>ui a client i an bu) 
one announcement a week if he wants 
to. 

Here'- the wa\ it work-: It tri\ i-- 

- the -.de of one-minute anno 



NEW YORK, CHICAGO 

LOS ANGELES, PHILADELPHIA 

AND SALT LAKE ! 

GOING PLACES? . . . then include the big n 
booming billion-and-a-quarter dollar Salt Lake 
market — and use KSL Radio, the only station 
that fits this 4 state, til county area like a glove. 

In Salt Lake City, home of KSL. per family 
retail sales are 35^ above the national average! 
Population growth is 29^ above the average. 

Get the complete KSL Radio story: market 
data, audience statistics and availabilities from 
CBS Radio Spot Sales or . . . 



KSL 



Radio . . . Salt Lake City 
50,000 watts . . . CBS in the Mountain West 




11 JULY 1955 



173 



Network radio 




QUARTER 
HOUR FIRSTS 

Than all other 
Stations Combined 



STATION 


QUARTER- 
HOUR FIRSTS 


WKBN-Radio 


129 


Station B 


68 


Station C 


27 


Station D 


2 


Station E 





Station F 





Ties 


8 


WKBN-RADIO SHARES 



Morning 38.2 

Afternoon 36.6 

Evening 40.0 

Source: C. E. Hooper, Inc., Nov. 1954 
thru March, 1955. 

The only station 

completely serving 

the 

YOUNGSTOWN 
MARKET! 



WKBN 

CBS-RADIO 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 
5000 Watts* 570 KG 

Rep resen ted Na tion a lly 
by Paul H. Raymer Co. 



merits in five-minute shows especially 
programed for the run-of-schedule 
plan. In buying the five-minute shows, 
tlie advertiser can designate in what 
time segment or segments he wants 
them run. These time segments are 
8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., 1:00 p.m. to 
6:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. 
This is local time. In other words, if 
he buys a show for the morning, he is 
guaranteed it will run with its com- 
mercial between 8:00 a.m. and 1:00 
p.m. He can buy one show for the 
morning and another for the after- 
noon, or he can buy three in the after- 
noon and five at night, etc. 

Here's where the run-of-schedule 
comes in: While the show will origi- 
nate at a fixed time, the stations are 
under no obligation to carry it at the 
same time. They can tape it and play 
it back whenever they want, providing 
the show is run during the time seg- 
ment designated by the client. As a 
matter of fact— and this is one of the 
revolutionary features of the plan— 
the stations don't even have to carry 
the show at all. They can just tape 
the commercial and play only the com- 
mercial back in one of their local 
shows during the time segment desig- 
nated. 

While the network has no way of 
predicting how many stations will car- 
ry a five-minute show at origination 
time, it is felt that a large number of 
them will do so. 



Programing 

Q. What are the network radio 
programing trends for the fall? 

A. There are two contrary trends oc- 
curring at the same time. The more 
general trend is to the use of short- 
length shows for nighttime strips dur- 
ing the week. This started in earnest 
last season and is being accelerated 
this coming season. On the other hand, 
there may be more of a trend toward 
multi-hour shows to be sponsored in 
segments. NBC Radio's Monitor is an 
extreme example of this but NBC is 
planning multi-hour shows during the 
week, too, though not as all-embracing 
as its present weekend format. 



Q. What are the reasons behind 
these programing trends? 

A. There is at least one common 
reason for both programing trends 



BEFORE-TV 
RATINGS 

when you buy 



m> 



Radio Ranch, in Houston 



MORNING 



"Laura Lee's Ranch" 
9:45 to 10:00 A.M. 
3.3 IN HOME 
.7 OUT OF HOME 

4.0 Total Pulse 



AFTERNOON 



"Bill's Bandwagon" 
4:30 to 4:45 P.M. 

4.0 IN HOME 
.8 OUT OF HOME 



4.8 Total Pulse 



NIGHT 



"Houston Hoedown" 
8:45 to 9:00 P.M. 

2.8 IN HOME 
.6 OUT OF HOME 



3.4 Total Pulse* 

GET THE WHOLE PICTURE.... 
COUNT ALL THE LISTENERS I 



in OUT OF HOME PULSE 

12 neon to 6 P.M. — Mon. thr 
Tied for No. 2 mornim 



* PULSE RATINGS 

OUT OF HOME-Jan. 55 
IN HOME - Jan.-Feb. 5 5 

K-NUZ 

NATL REPS.— FORJOE AND CO. 

IN HOUSTON, CALL DAVE MORRIS 

JAckson 3-2581 



174 



SPONSOR 



N . Iii ..I /. 



mentioned above, tad thai i- < ost. 
Generallj speaking, the longei the 
■how, the cheaper the talent pei time 
segment sold. \\ hile the sti ipa are 
often short in theii dail) length, a IS- 
minute -tii|> i-. aftei all, basicallj an 
hour-and-a-quartei show spread over 
the week. I bis economj . natural!) . is 
passed on to the advertiser. 

I ("in the prodi* tion point oi \ iew, 
long shows and ~iii|.-. are easiei t.> op> 
• rate and put together compared u ith, 
say, a series oi different half-how 
shows. I his also comes down t" a 
matter ol economj . 

< me important reason for strip pro- 
graming at night i- thai the radio lis- 
tener can easil) remember dial -u. h- 
and-such a show i* on at tin- same time 
each evening. I he networks < onsider 
this an advantage because it is felt 
that at night the audience has enough 
in remember in the ua\ of competi- 
tive t\ programing. So if there i- am 
wa) to make radio programing eas) 
to remember, they're for it. 

is indicated above in the section 
on radio buying patterns, strips also 
offer a ua\ of Belling Bhorl segments 
to the advertiser and ^iw the adver- 
tiser a method o I building up large cu- 
mulative audiences. 



Q. What are the networks plan- 
ning in the way of new program- 
ing for the fall? 

A. Radio network lineups, both as 
to advertisers and programs, are not 

USUall) -el until late in the summer 
these days hut the rundown, h\ net- 
works, below will give some idea of 

what - going on in the mind- of net- 
work programers. 




*"< • D.I. i iioiie. I to find a tin inula 

i"i ' ' iini inin u homes, espe< iall) 
ai night, \Kt has put resean h t.- work 
io find an answei \ resean hei N 
• \ \la/ui. has been brought ovei from 
the resean li depai tmenl to work on 
this programing problem. \li-- Mazui 
i- -tai ting from - rati h, h itli no pre- 
< onceptions, to stud) a\ ailable 

-«mi> li data in an ell.nl Io find what 

kind- ..I people listen w hen and wh) . 

^ us-. Hi,, network made an impoi I ml 
I rogram dei ision last season in de- 



. idin 

I In- pi 
erated t"i thi 

netwoi k - intention to di 
tin- evening weekd ij pei 

I In- would involve moving two 
ihui Godfre) shows out of the 

\ third single -\- 

!'• a. r mill It hi whi. h has been 

b) W i igle) this | 

• an. ellation rostei . I he -h..w * ill 

probabl) I..- tossed out in line with 

i BS Radio - poli< j ..l redu< ing the 

numbei <>f dramatic Bhows. 



ACRE for ACRE 

YOU CANT BUY BETTER 

KMA's .5 M.V. Primary Market 
Leads the Nation in Production 
of Corn, Hogs and Cattle! 




The Host Successful Form lilrc»rli.v<»r.v 
Are Selling the Nation's No. I Farm 
Market with tin* No, I Farm Station 



. . . K 3L 1 



What better market is there for your sales messages than an area 
that leads the nation acre-for-acre in production of corn, hogs and 
cattle? Every year KMA-landers harvest the profit of more than 426 
million bushels of corn, 99 million hogs, and 2 million cattle, accord- 
ing to U. S. Census Bureau figures. 

And there's proof aplenty that these rich-from-the-sod M'dwest- 
erners with an annual farm income of $1,989,914,000 listen most to 
KMA. A recent Pulse survey of 21 counties in Iowa, Nebraska, and 
Missouri showed KMA leads in all three of the six-hour periods of the 
broadcast day and is the most popular station in 61 of the 72 quarter- 
hour time segments. 



Sell the Nation's So. / Farm 
Market with tin- Vation's \<>. I 

Farm Station ... A 1/ / 



KMA's 5 M.V. PRIMARY MARKET" 
Population 2,859,300 

Radio Homes 817,379 

Retail Sales $3,081,010,000 

Farm Income $1,989,914,000 

■• SRDS Estimates 



"Maybe I should have left his 
radio tuned to KRIZ Phoenix." 




Gel the full story from your Pefry mon or write KMA 

THE HEARTBEAT OF THE CORN COUNTRY" 



MIKSI/A 



5000 WATTS • 960 KC 



7;k 



. SHENANDOAH, IOWA 

Represented by Edward Pefry & Co., Inc. 






11 JULY 1955 



175 




NUMBER ONE FORD RADIO SALESMAN 

AWARD— MADE TO WVOK, WBAM 
ANNOUNCER, DAN BRENNAN BY 
O. Z. HALL— TOP FORD DEALER IN 
SOUTH. LET DAN SELL FOR YOU. 



L^ult Collect: 



Ira Leslie — 
WVOK -WBAM National Sales, 
Birmingham 6-2924 

Radio Representatives, Inc. • New York, Chicago, Hollywood 

\\ hile CBS has been turning its old 
nighttime programing format during 
the week topsy-turvy, it is retaining its 
top stars. The Bing Crosby strip may 
be enlarged from 15 to 25 minutes and 
would probably run back-to-back with 
Amos 'n Andy Music Hall, which is 
a 25-minute show now. in the 9:00- 



10:00 period. There is a possibility 
of an Fdgar Bergen strip also at night. 

CBS has also been showing an in- 
terest in disk jockeys, a type of pro- 
graming fare the web has avoided in 
the past on the notion that network 
programing should be easily distin- 
guishable from that of the independent 
station. Already on at night is Fred 
dobbins' Disk Derby and Robbins has 
also been slotted in a 25-minute day- 
time strip. Hazel Bishop has signed 
up for a portion of the daytime Rob- 
bins show. Following its cancellation 
of FBI in Peace and War. Wriglev de- 
cided to sponsor d.j. Howard Miller in 
a morning strip. Miller is from Chi- 
cago, which is also Wrigle) headquar- 
ters, starts 18 July. 

Aside from the two new d.j. shows 
the only other daytime change on CBS 
up to the present will be the dropping 
of Rosemary and Hilltop House. The 
former will be replaced by Backstage 
Wife, moving over from NBC, while 
the latter's slot will be filled by moving 
House Party up a quarter hour to 4:00. 
P&G cancelled two days of Perry Ma- 
son and axed completely Young Dr. 
Malone and Brighter Day. The latter 
three soapers will remain where they 
are and are being offered in whole or 
in part by the network. As mentioned 
previously, Toni and Sleep-Eze have 
taken segments of Young Dr. Malone. 

HBSz Mutual has assembled a number 
of five-minute shows for its run-of- 
schedules plan ( see explanation above 
in network radio "buying patterns" 



section). They are varied in nature 
hut there won't be music in any o 
them because the network feels its af 
filiates are satisfying that need now 
Anion" them are a food show 7 , a do-it 
yourself show, a crime reporter show 

However, the network has an open 
mind on the subject of programing 
these short shows, and the advertiser 
can have pretty nearly anything he 
wants. They will not be run unless 
sold, but if a number of them are pur- 
chased they will probably originate as 
a block to avoid upsetting the network 
program schedule. Though they would 
originate in a block, they will not nec- 
essarily run on all stations together 
since, as explained previously, the sta- 
tions can run them at any time with- 
in the particular segment of the dav 
purchased by the advertiser. 

Mutual has alreadx started program- 
ing the first of what it hopes will be 
a series of programs to build a "per- 
sonality'' for the network. On since 1 
July is Mutual Morning, a weekday 
strip aired from 10:30 to 11:00. If the 
show is sold, there will be a Mutual 
Matinee and, maybe, a Mutual Evening. 

A brain-child of Robert Monroe. 
Mutuals new programing chief. Mu- 
tual Morning was described as "a guy 
\ isiting the home with interesting 
things to demonstrate and talk about." 
It is not a music show. The format 
includes dramatic segments, interviews, 
taped pickups of interesting events and 
people. Mutual's aim is to find per- 
sonalities for the show who can be 
identified with the network. These per- 




176 



SPONSOR 



N i (M til /, i iii/u 



tonalities would be exposed on othei 
-Inns s, m ould ,i I -< i do in nmen ials. 

MM".- While no weekda) Monitors are 

in the wink-. NBC it concentrating 
its thinking on l«ni^ biiows. Ii has al- 
read) made .1 start at nighl with its 
\ational Radio Fan Club, which had 
it- debut 17 June. I he show, f"i whi< Ii 
Mil' has greal expectations, repla es 
lii(/u\ with Garrowa) in the 9:00- 
10:00 period; ii is slated to be ex- 
tended to an hour and a half this 
month and two limn- later (probabl) 
minus a five-minute news show). The 
show i- aimed a! teenagers, and, indi- 
rectly, .it their parents, too. Ii will In 4 
-<>ld at a special package price wit! 
nents as -mall a- 15 minutes. The 
price for 15 minutes will range from 
mi In >l.n">n. depending ..11 the 
s!ze of bu) . Host i- d.j. Hill Silbert. 

I he program will be built around 
various name bands and singers such 
. - Eddie Fisher and the Fontaine Bis- 
ters and NBC i- bus} recruiting lis- 
tener- l>\ organizing fan clubs; hence 
the name ol the show. Gimmicks in- 
clude NRFC membership card- and a 
month!) magazine. 

Other long shows are being mullei 
over I'lit there i> n<>lliin>: crystallize! 




THE QUAD-CITIES 



Rock Island • Moline • East 
Moline, III. • Davenport, la. 

NOW 

1/4 MILLION 

PEOPLE 



According to Sales Management's 
Survey of Buying Power iMay 10, 
1 955 > the Quad-Cities now have 
250.200 people with an Effective 
Buying Income of $5843 per family 
or SI794 per capita. Cover this rich 
450 million dollar market with WHBF 
radio or TV — the Quad-Cities' favor- 
ites. 




a- iet. However, the new shows, will 
probabl) follow tin- Weavei pattern "I 
"sei \ i< e features i nd intei mitten) i \ 
posure in culture. ITiej ma) resemble 
NBC l\ shows like Home, Today and 
tonight with possibl) more entertain 
ineiii elements than appeal in Home 
and Today. I hen- has been some talk 
about organizing .1 company ol actors 
who w 1 mid 1 1 11 1 1 m vignettes oi excerpts 
from Broadwa) plays, linn ma) even 
he educational "classes with courses 
in -inh subje 1- .1- psychology . 

In all likelihiiiiil. these shows would 



appeal firsl .11 nighl hut the) 
linn- - onsidered solel) 
Howi \i 1 then i - 
1 d Ii .it in; lit id. in dm ing the 
.•ill strips in- hardei to pro 
nighl mi NBt ,-.- nl the • 

parativel) large numbei ol sit 
sponsored half-houi shows - atb 
around and -till expe< ted t" be on the 
well- -i hedule in tin- (.ill. 

I w 11 Boap opera can< ellations 
P&l ,'- /;,/, ksta -///'. 1 00 1 
rl 1 h .iti. in Soap - U oman m the 
Housi II I) highlight the d iy- 




k» w 34 



TH* 

IN HOME FURNI! 



Home Furnishing 
Store Sales 



32 



33 



ffi 



35 



ALLENTOWN 
BETHLEHEM - 
EASTON 



COLUMBUS 



PHOENIX 



TAMPA - 

ST. PETERSBURG .' 



Mil 



35.8 



33.6 



*SRD Consumer Markets '55 



This gratifying position in local Home 
Furnishing sales reflects the sharp in- 
crease in home-building in the Phoenix 
area — an increase that is expected to 
continue indefinitely. 
Don't skip this profitable market in YOUR 
sales-planning! Reach it the sales-build- 
ing way through KPHO, and KPHO-TV. 
They take your sales story right into the 
homes you most want to reach! 



SOLD 
re^etlea most effectively through . 



ttffS^I KPHO-TV °»<KPH0 



WHBF :. 

TELC0 BUILDING, ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 
Represented by Aver y-Knodel, lie. 



Channel 5 
First in Arizona since '49 



Dial 910 • ABC Basic 
Hi Fidelity Voice of Arizona 



NOW 



AFFILIATED WITH BETTER HOMES and GARDENS • REPRESENTED BY KATZ 



11 JULY 1955 



177 



Network rtiflio 



time program changes. Two other 
I'M, soapers will he thrown into the 

breach and the periods the latter two 
programs vacate (3:30-4:00) are ex- 
pected to be filled with conventional 
serials. While NBC has no specific 
plan- to program in the noon-3:00 
p.m. period — the three hours have not 
been programed for some time — the 
pattern set by Monitor makes it con- 
ceivable that something may be done 
about it in the future. 

As for Monitor itself, it will, of 
course, be continued in the fall. The 
basic format is not going to change 



but some shows within Monitor will. 
\\ ben Monitor began some of the reg- 
ular shows which had been on were 
carried along with it, Monitor being 
big enough to swallow these programs 
without <hanging its shape much. For 
example, Grand Ole Opry, that grand 
old veteran, will remain within the 
voluminous confines of Monitor next 
fall, occupying its regular 9:30 p.m. 
Saturday time. Meet the Press also re- 
mains, though it will be moved from 
10:30 to 0:00 p.m. Sunday. A few 
other shows will also stay put within 
Monitor's umbrella. 



HERES A MARKET 




52% ABOVE 
U.S. AVERAGE! 



From their farms alone, each Kansas farm family wound up 
the year with $8,830 in the bank — after taxes! That's 52% 
above the national average !* 

What's more, WIBW delivers this entire market — all tied 
up in a single package. Year in and year out, every Whan 
survey consistently shows that these big-income farmers 
listen more to WIBW than any other radio station. 

We've got the listeners. They've got the cash. Give us the 
word and we'll give you the sales. 



* Consumer Markets. 1955. 




TOPEKA, 
KANSAS 

Ben Ludy, Gen. Mgr. 
WIBW & WIBW-TV in Topeka 

KCKN in Kansas City 
Rep: Capper Publications, Inc. 



In addition, a new show, sponsored 
h\ \utrilite, will occupy 55 minutes 
of Monitor (5:05-6:00 p.m. I on Sun- 
day afternoons starting 6 September. 
Not only is Nutrilite going against the 
trend by sponsoring a show all by it- 
self (Woolworth has already gone 
against the trend with its hour show 
on CBS Radio) but it is defying all 
the smart boys by putting on drama. 
The show will feature Pat O'Brien and 
a script contest. 

Q. What's been the trend in lis- 
tening to network radio, day and 
night? 

A. The move away from the eve- 
ning, once-a-week show is more than 
a change in buying strategy as Niel- 
sen figures show. This type of show 
has suffered the greatest loss in audi- 
ence. During the first week in April 
1954. the evening, once-a-week show 
averaged 1,959.000 homes. During the 
first week in April 1955. the average 
was 1.146,000 homes. (This decline is 
partly accounted for by the dropping 
of some top-rated once-a-week shows. I 
The da\time and nighttime strips 
have held up much better, though they 
still show average declines in audi- 
ences. For the same April weeks in 
1954 and 1955. respectively, the eve- 



WFAS 

WW laflM WITIT rT5: 50.000 

WATTS REACHES OVER 814.000 
RADIO HOMES! 



WEAS 



REGULARLY 
DRAWS MAIL FROM 5 OF THE MOST 
IMPORTANT SOUTHERN STATES ! 



WEAS 



HAS 

COMPLETE SATURATION THROUGH- 
OUT THE NORTH GEORGIA "BROILER 
CENTER OF THE WORLD, AS WELL 
AS THE LUCRATIVE PEACH AND 
CATTLE RAISING AREAS. 



WEAS 



178 



BY JUDICIOUS USE 

OF COUNTRY AND GOSPEL MUSIC 

PROGRAMMING, HAS BECOME THE 

"FAMILY'S FAVORITE STATION". 



WEAS 

50,000 WATTS 
1010 K.c. DECATUR, CA. 



CALL STARS NATIONAL 
Chicago — New York — Los Angeles 



N i Mi <•* I. I mil, i 



ning multi-weekl) Bhows have dropped 
from 1,026,000 to 825,000 homes on 
the average while weekday daytime 
~h< >w - dropped from 1,679,000 i" 1.- 
167,000 homes. During the 12-month 
period these figures span, daytime 
shows passed nighttime once-a-week 
- 1 1 < > w — as ii>|i audience-grabbers. 

I hese daytime averages hide the fa< i 
thai in Borne cases L955 Nielsen audi- 
ences are greatei than the yeai before. 
For example CBS Radio points oul 
that mosl of the leading Boapers are 
topping theii 1954 audiences tlii- year, 
according to the second Vpril reports. 
lor example, Guiding Light went from 
2,006,000 to 2,476,000 homes, Young 
Dr. Mdone from 1,446,000 to 2,385,- 
000 homes. 

Costs sincl r;il cvs 



Q. How do network radio costs 
compare with tv networks? 
A. \ recent Nielsen calculation 
Bhowed the following comparisons in 
terms oi cost-per-1,000 homes ]»'t com- 
mercial minute: 

Average daytime costs: radio, $.79; 
tv, 11.47. 

Average nighttime costs: radio 
12.26; tv, 12.71. 

Q. Have network radio costs 
been keeping in line with reduced 
audiences? 

A. \ recent Btud) bj NBC illustrates 
how changing show formats and lower 
time costs during the past two seasons 
have brought network radio down to 
economical levels. 

The NBC -iu<l\ deals with Fibber 
WcGee and Mollv. which had lieen a 




"I'll take the advice of KRIZ Phoe- 
nix today and try your scrambled 
brains." 

11 JULY 1955 



lialf-houi one e-a-week show through 
the 1952 >3 season and then < hanged 
to a -\i ip. I'll, figures covei 1946 un- 
til tin- present. I <■ illustrate the < "»t 
trend in terms oJ "real" dollars, the 
cost-per-1,000 figures have been 
weighted a. . ording to the redui ed 
pun basing powei "I tin- dollai . h hich 
declined more than 25* i during the 
past nine years. In ordei to compare 
the old formal with the new, the rat- 
ings foi the -iii|> have been calculated 
in terms of cumulative audience ovei 
three broadcasts. 

I fere a h hat happened during the 
nine-year period: 



I lir I all 

■ i from I 1 ,696,001 > h 

to '■ ;i. total < ..-i oi tl 

also da lined 

pei 1,000 m ! in 

1946 and onl) three • ents more in 
19 ' >. Howevei . in terms "i the n al 
pun basing powei ■ <! the dollar, the 

■ osl per-1,1 in 1955 

OI 66 less than in 1946 



Q. Will network radio rates be 
changed this fall? 
A. I he i at cards oi di the net- 
works except \l!< have been 01 w ill 



NOW! — A Second Printing 



32 TELEVISION TALKS" 

transcribed from the 

BMI TV CLINICS -1954 



Combines the knowledge and 
experiences of 32 TV leaders 
in every phase of TV 
programming and production 
. . . factual, informative and 
down-to-earth talks by men 
who have been in the 
industry from the ground up. 



Published by BMI at $7 and 
made available as an industry 
service at the cost of transcribing 
and printing — $4.20 post paid. 




"*.'i2 Television Talk-" i« an entirely 
fresh and stimulating report of the 
BSD TV Clinic sessions conducted in 
New ^ ork. Chicago and Los kngeles 
during 1954 ... a new anil up-to-date 
hook which follow* up "Tv. enty-Two 
TV Talks." published in 1*>".2. 
•'How to do it" i- the theme of "32 T\ 
Talk*."* with complete data on -nrh 
>ital topics as: film buy hip and film 



programming . . ■ nan and tpedal 
event* . . . lui^t- in production . . . 
educational and commercial program* 
ming . . . Ion coal production ■ ■ . I<» ul 
programming . ■ ■ promotion and pao 
H, relation* . . . idea* and imagination 
, . . as well a- doaeni "i other •'--< ntiaJ 
elements in I \ ■ 

In addition to the *2 to Ik-, the honk 
includes transcripts of the <.•! I STION 
and \\s\M H periods of the Clinics. 



(If you attended one «/ the BMl-T) ( Unit* you only heard about of the t«lk-) 



Broadcast Music, Inc. 

589 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 17, N.Y. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD • TORONTO • MONTREAL 



179 




Network radio 



be changed tin- summer. At least one 
card v\ ill involve lower nighttime costs. 

I'art of the reason for the changes is 
I In desire of the networks to simplify 
their rate cards, which had become so 
complicated that onl\ experts could 
understand them. 

What had been happening was this: 
l>\ leaving gross rates unchanged and 
setting up all kinds of discount for- 
mulae tor various segments of the day, 
the networks had been quietly moving 
toward more or less a single rate for 
day and night. However, it was only 
apparent when specific night and night 
buys were worked out mathematically. 
The new cards will formalize the -in- 
gle rate, though this does not mean in 
all cases that actual dollar cost for 
equal-sized shows will be identical 
morning, noon and night. For exam- 
ple, morning time will remain premium 
time in some cases. 



Q. What specific changes will be 
made in the rate cards? 

A. ABC was first to publish a sin- 
gle-rate card. It was put out last Oc- 
tober. Though Mutual had been mull- 
ing over a single-rate card for more 
than a year, it was not published un- 
til less than two weeks ago ( 1 July I . 
The ABC card provided for a single 
gross rate, but varied weekly dollar 
volume discounts going up to 30% in 
the morning, 42 % in the afternoon 
and 36' £ in the evening with maxi- 
mum annual discounts reaching, re- 
spectively, 43, 54 and 45' < . 

The Mutual rate card change is the 
most drastic of all the networks. It is 



completely new and at Mutual is con- 
sidered a thing of beauty in its sim- 
plicity. It not onl) provides for a sin- 
gle gross rate but also for a single 
discount schedule from 6:00 a.m. to 
midnight I nighttime costs will be 
slightly lower since Mutual"* full nel- 
u oik is 34 stations smaller after dark I . 
The basic gross rate lone-time, one- 
hour I is around $14,000. Discounts 
are figured on a weeklv dollar volume 
basis, which is the standard method 
on networks these davs. These dis- 
counts start at 20' < for billings of 
more than $2,000 and go up to 40', 
for billings of 823.000 or more week- 
ly. There is an annual rebate of 7 1 •_>' < 
for 52-week clients and an over-all dis- 
count I in lieu of weekly discounts and 
annual rebate) of 47' ■/ < for spend- 
ing of more than $1.2 million during 
a year's time. 

The net effect of these rates, which 
are for standard buys and do not ap- 
ply to participation package prices or 
lun-of-schedule purchases, provides for 
reduction in nighttime costs of from 
about 10 to 30'/? compared with the 
old rate card. Daytime is about the 
same cost as before. 

Mutual also set up a schedule in its 
new rate card for the various-sized an- 
nouncements in its participation shows. 
These are. as mentioned previously, 
one-minute, 45-second. 40-second, 30- 
second, 20-second and six-second bill- 
boards. In the past, only minutes 
were available on participation shows. 
These minutes included opening and 
closing billboards and went as low as 
$1,500 per announcement. In the new 
schedule, minutes and billboards are 



separated. 1 hat is. an advertiser can 
bin a minute without buying a bill- 
board. With maximum discounts, these 
minutes are as cheap as $1,000 now. 
and with two billboards the price, at 
maximum discounts, comes to $1,420. 
Depending on both frequency per 
week and number per year the partici- 
pation announcement schedule has the 
following maximums and minimums: 
one-minute $1,500 to $1,000 each: 
45-second- $1,200 to $800; 40-second 
—$1,100 to S750: 30-second— $900 to 
-COD: 20-second— 8750 to $450: bill- 
boards (available onlv in conjunction 
with the purchase of announcements in 
participation showsi — 8330 to $210. 
The rate for minute announcements on 
the five-minute run-of-schedule shows 
starts at $975 and goes down to 8625. 
In all cases the maximum discounts 
are given for buys of at least 260 an- 
nouncements running at the rate of 10 
or more a week within 52 weeks. 

Mutual's new gross rates are actual- 
ly the regular daytime rates now ap- 
plied to nighttime. This means that 
the nighttime gross was brought down 
50%. However, this had practical!) 
been in effect previously since Mutual s 
old rate card provided for a fiat night- 
time reduction of 5(Ky for stations 
in tv markets. 

CBS is going to a single growth rate 
card. Actual cost to advertisers will 
remain the same with morning and 
night rates equal, afternoon a little 
less. Weekend rates will be raised 
slightly, however. NBC is expected, as 
in the past, to make rate changes com- 
petitive with CBS. • • • 



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Featuring 



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Red Ryan - 

9 years Slate Capitol 

newscaster 



Chuck Elliott as 

"Charlie the Square" 
7 year veteran with a 
huge loyal following 

Chucks — Atomic Boogie 
Rhythm & Blues 



WMGY 



MONTGOMERY, 
ALABAMA 



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Another Independent 
Metro-Market Station 

Thomas W. Sewell, Cen. Mgr., Rep. Forjoe, Inc., New York City 
Dora Clayton, Inc.. Atlanta 



180 



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KANSAS CITY • LOS ANGELES • SAX FRANCISCO 



11 JULY 1955 



181 




"My Ideal Rep" 

.»>. JIM LUCE of 

\ w \\ n n i BOMPSON 



"strives for automatic improve- 

oi M , > . 1 1 . ■ i , i ■ • sch ed 
He works with his stat Ions 
i" Kt\r in. as they 

. n\ allable." 




"My Ideal Rep* 

■ayi MAC DUNBAB 

of TED BATES 



"delivers availabilities promptly 
and always Includes pertinent 
data such as ratings, costs 
and, most Important, indicates 
premium rati s for programs 
not so listed in SRDS." 



I- 



.Wi/ ideal Rep' 



■ya ARTHUR S. PARDOLL 
of FOOTE, CONE & BELDING 

"provides the necessary 

information in his first presenta- 
tion and eliminates unessen- 
tial data. In the careful 
preparation of his material, 
he i I'ies to anticipate all 
quest ions." 




• Hi/ Ideal It 

says HALE BYER! 
BBDO, MINNF.APJ 



'knows his markets, is com- 
pletely honest in his presentl| 
tions, and doesn't try to 
sell me a pig-in-the-poke." 



§ MF IDEAL REP* 9 
ask any tap timebuyer 



The quotes on this page might well 
serve as a standard of ethics and activ- 
ity for any conscientious national rep- 
resentative. JEPCO knows that appli- 
cation of these yardsticks comes close 
to being a guarantee of success. Suc- 
cess for the rep, success for the stations 
represented. You can fully expect any 
JEPCO salesman to faithfully live up 
to this philosophy of doing business. 



John E. Pearsan Cawnpany 

RADIO AND TELEVI&IOX S 7 ATI N B E V B E 8 E N T A TIT E 8 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO . MINNEAPOLIS • DALLAS • ATLANTA . LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 




•* 



'.>Ii/ Ideal Rep*" E 



.;,>- MILDRED FUTON 
of McCAN.N-ERICKSON w' 



"uses the valuable time 

buyer's office to sell his stati 

rather than to undersell 

competition. He sells his i 

tions honestly, thereby a 

the advertiser of sales rest 

that match the sales piti 




"My Ideal Re 

says HELEN THOMA.' 
STREET & FINNE1 



"doesn't forget the account 
after the contract is in. Ib- 
continues servicing the a 
by suggesting improvements 
in schedule when they become 
available and therefore h.los 
maintain the best possible 
schedules for the client.'' 




"My Ideal Rep" 

>a>< BETH BLACK of 
HARRY B. COHEN 



"knows his stations' program 

He can tell quickly wheth 

'Aunt Tillie's Note Book' is a k 

show or a cooking school. 

usually makes a difference 



"My Ideal Rep" 

-..*. I MET SLAYBAUGH 
of TED BATES 



"shows ingenuity in 'digging 

nid cooperation in 
working out' schedules that 
meet my clients' requirements. 
He does not merely submit 
a cut and dried list of 
availatilil 



1 ~ 



*IM "My ideal Rep' 

"5? says CHUCK WILDS of 

«**•»«* N. W. AYER, 

"doesn't hesitate to use the 
teletype or telephone when a 
quick decision is needed 
from a station." 




"My Ideal Rep* 

says TED KELLY of 
McCANN-FRICKSON 



"My ideal would provide the 
intangible data concerning a 
market or station area not 
found in the general statistical 
sources, i.e., would provide 
data either common to other 
markets or specific to 
the market's makeup. Such 
information would aid the buyer 
in selecting the audience 
most suitable for the product." 



? 



"My Ideal Rep 

says BILL KENNEDY 
of TED BATES 



"gives me straight informa- 
tion on his availabilities 
and his stations." 



1955 I III I tCTS B ISH S SECTI01S 




wadio 




NEARLY 46,000,000 HOMES HAVE 
RADIOS; TWO-THIRDS ARE MULTIPLE-SET 

/' „• \ imber 
Q. How many radios are there in I ,S.? 1 

Q. Where are radio >et> located? 2 

Q. How many anlo radio* are there? 3 

Q. How many homes doe* radio reach weekly? 5 

Q, What does "out-of-home" radio add? 6 

Q. How does radio compare to other media? 10 

Q. What i» "saturation" radio? H 

Q. How much nionry was spenl in radio? 12 

Reprints will be available at 30C each, tfuantitu prices on request. 
Write to Sponsor Sen-ices. Inc.. 10 E. Iftth St.. \etr York 17. V *. 




1. How many radios (all types) are there in the U.S. today? 

SOURCES: NAB records for Jan. 1945 figure; Jan. 1955 estimate from NBC and CBS Radio research departments. 

More than 100% increase in decade 

Total number of radios in U.S. (counting 
those needing repair) has more than dou- - 

bled in decade between close of WW II and 
today, despite postwar growth of U.S. tv. 



59,000,000 




1945 



1955 



2. Does radio set production reflect "post-tv" listening habits? 



SOURCE: RETMA 1947 and 1954 industry production figures 
PRODUCTION BY TYPES: HOUSEHOLD CLOCK 



PORTABLE 



AUTO 



BEFORE TV: 1947 


70% 


1% 


12% 


17% 


AFTER TV: 1954 


29% 


18% 


13% 


40% 



Trend to "secondary" auto sets 

With much radio listening moving 
from living room to other 
locations with coming of tv, set 
production has shifted strongly 
to "clock," "auto" types. 



3. How many U.S. homes today have one or more radios? 



SOURCES: NBC and CBS Radio research depts. estimate for January 1955 




Homes with one or more radios 



96.3% of U.S. homes have radio 

Radio has the widest penetration of any 
mass communications medium. Joint net- 
work estimate is based on Polrtr-ARF 
ownership against updated Census base. 




Homes with no radios 



ii 'A V '< it Pflvlvv 



page 1 



4. What percent of radio homes now have two or more radios? 

SOURCE Njtionjl Survey of R.nlio jnd T. UviMon Sell Mjy 1 95-t by Alfred Politz for ARF 




33.8', have 
only one jet 




3?.7'r have 
two jets 




33. 5' ( have three 
or more receivers 



I'ni.-lliir il- .,,,■ '•lillllli 

Key to diffused' listening to 
radio in many different locations 
is found in preponderance 
of multi-set radio homes. Ac- 
cording to nationwide study by 
Politi for Advertising Research 
Foundation, two cut of every 
three homes has at least two 
radio receivers in working order. 



5. Where are U.S. radios located (in and out of homes) ? 



SOURCE: "National Survey of Radio and Television 
Sets." May 1954 by Alfred Politz tor ARF 



70' » of radio* arc within hoino«> 

There are more radios in U.S. autos today 
than there are in the living room; there 
are almost as many in bedrooms, or in 
kitchens and dining rooms, according to '54 
study by Politi for Advertising Research 
Foundation. Main reason for "scattering" 
of radio receivers: coming of U.S. video. 



Other 




Autos 



6. How does the total number of radio sets compare with tv set total? 



SOURCE: NBC Radio and Tv Research departments. Radio: (an. '55; Tv: |une '55 



Radio: 132,400,000 sets 



Tv: 36,200,000 sets 



Radios outnumber t\ three-to-one 

Unlike radio, tv is a "living room" 
air medium. Radios are distributed 
(see chart above) in multi-set homes. 



MB!8 BASICS I rte 3 



■ 



7. How many cars in the U.S. are radio equipped ? 

SOURCES: 1946 figure from NAB. for January; 1955 figure from Crowell-Collier annual "Automotive Survey." 



Car radio* have quadrupled 

American families own more car 
radios than there were radio 
homes just 15 years ago. Number 
of car radios approaches the 
total number of television homes. 



7,500,000 



1946 




8. Do owners listen? What percent of cars have radios? 

SOURCES: (A) Advertest Research "Do they listen?" study for CBS Radio, November 1954. (Bl Crowell-Collier "Automotive Survey," 1954 



A. Car radio listening to programs, commercials 



THE QUESTIONS: 

"Do you have a radio in working order installed 
•*■ • in your automobile?" 


THE ANSWERS: 

"1 Of the 344 cars interviewed, 77% had 
■*-* working car radios. 


s\ "Did you happen to listen to any parts of the "Jack 
^' Benny" (or "Amos 'n' Andy" program tonight? 


sy The "|ack Benny" and "Amos V Andy" programs 
^* had an average rating in the test of 23.1%. 


O "Can you tell me as much as you remember about 
"• the advertising which was presented on either 
program this evening?" 


o Of all those tuned to "|ack Benny" or "Amos V 
**• Andy" shows, three-quarters (75.4%) could repeat 
substantial portions of commercials. 



B. Car radio ownership, by model years and income groups 



SPECIAL EQUIPMENT 
ON CARS NOW 
OWNED 


TOTAL CARS - By YEAR MODEL 


BY INCOME GROUPS 


Cars 

Total 

% 


1953- 
1954* 

% 


1952 

% 


1950- 
1951 

% 


1948- 
1949 

% 


1946- 
1947 

% 


Before 

1946 1 
% 


$7000 

or more 

% 


$5000- 

$6999 

% 


$4000- 
$4999 

% 


$3000- 
$3999 

% 


$2000- 
$2999 

% 


Under 
$2000 

% 


Heater 


94 


96 


95 


98 


96 


93 


86 


96 


95 


95 


96 


91 


89 


Radio 


75 


78 


78 


77 


82 


78 


56 


84 


77 


77 


75 


67 


66 


Seat Covers 
Turn Indicators 
Backup Light 
Automatic Transmission 
Power Brakes 
Power Steering 


68 
56 
37 
29 
6 
5 


41 
94 
57 
50 
14 
14 


62 
87 
55 
52 
11 
10 


76 
62 
36 
36 
4 
3 


81 
42 
36 
18 
2 
1 


78 
28 
22 
12 

3 

* * 


71 

14 

12 

5 

2 

2 


57 
81 
55 
50 
10 
11 


65 
64 
42 
37 

4 
4 


70 
53 
32 
26 
5 
5 


71 
51 
31 
22 
6 
4 


75 
41 
29 
18 
6 
4 


77 
29 
24 
15 
4 
3 



{'; '/-. ■:> i U 'A !> \ I ::> page 3 



lived in OMAHA 




vou'd listen to 



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for MUSIC you like 

old — new- 
mood — blue 
semi-classic too 

you'd listen to C20Q& 



for NEWS you like 

5 minutes of fresh 
news reports on the 
hour and half-hour 

you'd listen to C20QH 



for SPORTS you like 

EXCLUSIVE 

voice of 

OMAHA CARDINALS 

you'd listen to [3000 



for PERSONALITIES you like 

who love their 
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you'd listen to C20DH 



DIAL 



. for RESULTS you want 

BUY 

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A \7 C D V If hi ft H C I Uf New York Chicago Los Angeles 

nlLl\rl\llVL/LL 11 V* San Francisco Dallas Atlanta 



11 JULY 1955 



187 



9. How many portable radios are there in this country? 

SOURCES: SPONSOR estimate based on RETMA data; NBC Radio Research Oept. 



1946 




1,500,000 



1955 




4,800,000 



Portable* : one in 10 homo 

Production of portable radios, 
both "personat" and battery-a.c. 
types, has boomed in past decade, 
now amounts to over million a 
year. These figures are set totals. 



10. What is the ownership status in U.S. homes of ALL receivers? 

SOURCE: "National Survey of Radio and Television Sets," May 1954 by Alfred Politz for ARF; updated household figures from NBC and CBS Radio Research 

Most households have radios, or radio-tv; few tv-only 



TOTAL NUMBER OF U.S. HOUSEHOLDS 
HOUSEHOLDS WITH RADIO, AUTO RADIO AND TV 
AUTO RADIO, TV BUT NO HOUSEHOLD RADIOS 
HOUSEHOLDS WITH RADIO, AUTO RADIO, NO TV 
HOUSEHOLDS WITH RADIO, TV, NO AUTO RADIO 
HOUSEHOLD RADIO (S) ONLY 
AUTOMOBILE RADIO ONLY 
TELEVISION SET ONLY 
NO HOUSEHOLD RADIO, AUTO RADIO, TV SET 



% 
100.0 



33.1 

13.4 

21.8 

1.5 

24.2 

0.7 

1.7 

3.6 



Number 
46,600,000 



15,400,000 

6,250,000 

10,150,000 

700,000 

11,275,000 

326.000 

792,500 

1,675,000 



RADIO IN THE UNITED STATES TODAY: 



Chart above will show admen at a glance how deeply radio 
penetrates into U.S. households. Homes without one or 
more radio receivers, in or out of home itself, are a rarity 
in the average community. On the other hand, less than 
2' '( of nation's homes are "television-only'' households. 
Politz study for ARF used a stringent definition of "sets 
in working order" in making its nationwide study of a 
cross-section of some 12,000 U.S. homes in all areas and 
income brackets. Interviewing was done on a personal 
basis, between 3 May and 28 May 1954. 

As charts in pages to follow will show, the effect of tv 
on most radio-tv households has been to "disperse" radio 
listening to locations other than the living room, and to 



make radio a "companion'" medium that follows listeners 
around the house and out of home as thev go about their 
daily living and working routines. Same trend also in- 
creases greatly the complexity of proper measurement of 
size of radio program audiences, with much of audience 
out of reach of some forms of radio audience measurement. 
Over-all trend indicated in radio ownership and set re- 
tailing surveys is that radio will continue to grow in the 
paths of "secondary sets" (clock radios, portables, small 
table receivers ) and. to some extent, with fancy "hi-fi 
radio-phonograph sets in homes. Out-of-home. the trend is 
definitely on toward auto radios, which are actually selling 
faster than tv receivers in most of the major I .S. markets. 






Just the facts, sir 




That's what you want. 



And that's what you'll get in these two new Market Data Folders — 
one for WFAA - 570, one for WFAA - 820. 

They're just off the press and contain the most complete 
information available about Texas' Dallas-Fort Worth area. 

You'll find: 

* Coverage data, county by county 

* Audience figures, by NCS market areas 

* Market data for the coverage area 

* Population and home-ownership figures 

* Farm market and income 

* Retail sales and other statistics 

These folders bring into sharp focus the facts about the biggest market in the 

biggest state in the nation. They're part of WFAA's client-service program planned to make 

your advertising on this station effective and profitable. 

For the facts, write for these NEW Market Data Folders. They're yours for the asking. 



Also available toon 

North Texas Radio Audience 

A study in radio listcninc 

by Or. Forrest Whan 

Kansas State College 



A Clear Channel Service of the Dallas Morning News 



WRA 



Alex Keese, Manager 

Geo. Utley, Commercial Manager 

Edward Petry & Co., Inc., Representative 




NBC 



ABC 



TON 



11 JULY 1955 



189 




ia listening habits 




1. How does daily radio listening in homes compare with "pre-tv"? 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen NRI, first six months each year; seven-day averages for nighttime and afternoon periods. 1946 radio homes: 34,000,000. 
1954: 46,646,000 homes. Prepared by ABC Radio 

Number of homes using radio (000)* 



11,526 



7,344 8,350 



7,854 7,883 




1946 1954 

10 a.m. -Noon 




1946 1954 

Noon-6 p.m. 




1946 1954 

6-11 p.m. 



*In the morning, 14% more homes are tuning radio during the the number of homes liming radio within the home made a notice- 

avera'ge minute than did in 1946. Afternoon radio, in terms of able decline. These levels are general, however. Careful time- 

listening homes, is slightly ahead of 1946 level. Only at night has buying will often produce nighttime buys that top daytime. 



2. What is the size of "weekly cumulative" home audience of radio? 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen NRI, spring 1955 



MORNING 
(6 AM-NOON) 



During average week, nine out of 10 homes have dialed radio 

HOMES REACHED AVG. HRS. LISTENED 

% TOTAL HOMES 000 PER HOME PER WEEK 

ALL HOMES 77.8 35,678 7:02 

TV HOMES - 75.4 24,580.. 6:30 

RADIO ONLY 83.7 ...11.098 8:17 



AFTERNOON 
(NOON-6 PM) 



ALL HOMES 

TV HOMES . 
RADIO ONLY 



79.0 36,217 7:35 

. .75.1 . 24,483 .... 6:20 

.88.5... 11,734 _. .......10:12 



NIGHT 
6 PM-MID) 



ALL HOMES 70.0. 32.116 6:16 

TV HOMES . 62.4 ... 20,342.. 3:42 

RADIO ONLY 88.8 _11,774 10:43 



total day { ALL HOMES 90.6% 41,527 17:32 






page 5 





your personal radio salesman in Washington 



B< innii fulj 1 . U Ro ■••■ ill 
l>i ing In- pei sonal tout : 
new eai ly ■morning radio iho* 
and ii- - onu ier< H< I 

I imekeepa on W I' 1 
Monday through I i idaj and 
6:15-8 00 Satui d >\ morning 

\l i- one "l the most phenomenally 
successful disc jockeys in th<- I 
. . . and for vei y good reasons. 
I Ii- entertainment Jut- thai 
personal tow h. \l has .i knai k of 
selecting the liits from the current 
releases ami picking everybody's 
favorite old timers. And as "Yom 
Timekeeper" he delivers a smooth. 
easy blend of headline news, time 
checks, weather reports ami sportfl 
that's just right for the early 
morning. The commercials get 
the same treatment. Al uses sound 
effects, recorded excerpt- and 
several different voices to make 
commercials a joy to hear and a 
goldmine to sponsors. 

For years national advertisers such 
as Wildroot Hair Tonic, Pall Mall 
Cigarettes, and Fels Naptha have 
been building their spot radio 
schedules in Baltimore around 
Al Ross. Now if you want a personal 
representative in Washington to 
carry your story home to America's 
richest mass market. Al Ross 
is your man. Call your NBC 
Spot Sales representative or 



WRC m RADIO 




IN WASHINGTON 

represented by NBC SPOT SALES 



3. How much does "out-of-home" audience add to "in-home" radio? 

SOURCE: The Pulse, Inc., winter 1955. Markets are those in which Pulse conducts monthly o-o-h studies 



'Out-of-honie" listening adds "bonus" of nearly 22% 



In-home 1 + Out-of-home" 



Atlanta 


17.8 


Baltimore 


16.3 


Birmingham 


19.4 


Boston 


19.2 


Buffalo 


17.4 


Chicago 


18.6 


Cincinnati 


16.4 


Detroit 


16.9 


Houston 


19.7 


Kansas City 


18.1 


Los Angeles 


19.4 


Memphis 


21.6 


Miami 


21.0 


Milwaukee 


17.2 


Minn.-St. Paul 


18.3 


New Orleans 


19.3 


New York 


18.7 


Philadelphia 


15.4 


Pittsburgh 


18.8 


Portland, Ore. 


23.6 


Richmond 


17.2 


San Diego 


18.6 


San Francisco 


20.2 


St. Louis 


17.5 


Seattle 


19.4 


Wash., D. C. 


18.4 


AVERAGE 





This plus 







26 markets 18.5 



21.6% 



J Average quarter-hour sets-in-use of in-home radio listening. ?Aver- 
age quarter-hour sel-in-use of out-of-home radio listening. 3 The 
percent of listening added by out-of-home. (This is derived by 



calculating the ritio of out-of-home to in-home listening.) All fig- 
ures in this chart cover 6 a.m. through midnight, Sunday through 
Saturday. Out-of-home dialing is done most!) in automobiles. 



8 & ft f ft '</.'!■'■:'.?■ '■:■ 



page 6 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA iand western nevadai 




RAD I O 







These four inland radio stations, purchased as a unit, give you 
more listeners than any competitive combination of local stations 
. . . and at the lowest cost per thousand! (SAMS and SR&D) 

In this mountain-isolated market, the Beeline serves an area 
with over 2 million people and 3V4 billion in spendable income. 

(1955 Consumer Markets) 



KOH O RENO 

KFBK O SACRAMENTO 




KMJ O FRESNO 

) \ 

KERN O BAKERSFIELD 



/HcCiatciuf ^ficadccLstiAA^ C&topou*Af 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA • Paul H. Raymer Co., National Representative 
11 JULY 1955 




193 



4. How does radio's total audience vary during day? 



SOURCE: "Word Daily Living Habits Survey" for MBS. fall 1954 



Radio's 

TOTAL 

AUDIENt 




MORNING AFTERNOON 






E V 


E N 1 


N G 






J 


J 


, .< 






j 


W^ 


:e 










W 


Millions 
of Peopi 


e 




H 




— 




-■J 


- 










|-" 






1 










1>- 


KEY 






_ 






_ 


_ 






. 












m 


1 ^_ 


Total Listening 


■ 




































In Home 
Listening 








- 




























e- 




9 10 10 1) 11-12 12 1 12 2 3 3 4 4-5 St. 6 7 7-8 8 9 9 10 10 -1 


^ir 



\\ an I stud) measures both in-home and out-of-home radio 
radio audience b\ millions of individuals throughout day, 
as shown in chart of "total audience'" above. Peak of "to- 
tal"' listening comes in late mornings (10-11 a.m.) and in 
early evening (6-7 p.m.). The $150,000 study utilized a 



sample of some 7.000 households, employing a diary tech- 
nique to record radio listening as it shifts I see chart 
below) around the house, and out of home. Complete 
study for MBS gives listening totals by quarter-hours for 
each day of the week. Full study is available to admen. 



5. How does location of "in-home" audience vary, hour-by-hour? 



SOURCE: "Ward Daily Living Habits Survey" for MBS, fall 1954 



DISTRIBUTION OF LISTENING - 

® © 


AVERAGE QUARTER HOUR 

© o ® 


MORNING 


349 


406 9$ 




9 AM-12 N 




6-11 PM 



KEY ( A : Living room %jM Bedroom C Kitchen %*M Other room in home ( E ) Other place outside home 

Radio follows the listener around the house today: no kitchens and bedrooms. In the afternoon, 

longer must he trek into the living room. As Ward < hart similar, with out-of-home radio I mostly in 

for MBS shows, half of morning radio is listened to in ing a major factor. Only at night does liv 



"THK^-J 



the pattern is 
autos I becom- 
ing room lead. 



P h '■'■ ': fl R A ? ! f* <? 

n n u i %i g « ii'4 



page 7 



WTIC 



...By Every Measurement 
A GREAT RADIO STATION 




Measure of a Great 

Radio Station 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
THE HENRY I. CHRISTAL CO., INC, 



NEW YORK. 



.BOSTON. 



CHICAGO 



DETROIT. 



11 JULY 1955 



SAM FRANCISCO 

195 



6. Where does "out-of-home" listening take place? 

SOURCE: The Pulse, Inc. surveys in August 1953 and November 1954 

Location shifts to auto-, portables in summer 



Location of 
'out-of-home" .,//«! 
listening 



Auto 


Summer '53 
61.8% 


Winter '54 
54.8% 




Work 


25.5% 


29.4% 


Visiting 


14.1% 


16.8% 




Portables 


5.0% 


0.9% 


Restaurants 


3.9% 


3.5% 


Retail shops 


6.3% 


10.0% 


Schools, etc. 


1.0% 


1.6% 






117.6%* 


117.0%* 





*multiple responses 



7. How does "auto audience" size vary, hour-by-hour? 



SOURCE: "Ward Daily Living Habits Survey" for MBS, fall 1954 



MORNING AFTERNOON 



. 



EVENING 



^% 



Millions 

of 

People 

AWAY 

FROM 

HOME 

m 

AUTOMOBILES 




9 10 10-11 11 12 12 1 1-2 2 3 3 4 4-5 5-6 6 7 II 8 9 9 10 10-11 



The U.S. is the world's most auto-minded nation. And, 
with TV, of the cars equipped with radios, the radio 
audience on wheels is sizable. Ward chart above shows 
how this listening peaks in the morning, and rises again 
to a high point in the afternoons, between 4 and 5 p.m.. 



when some nine million listeners on the average are 
dialing radio in cars all over the United States. Nielsen 
reports, meanwhile, that car radio listening has as high 
as 3.4 listeners per set. and that this out-of-home listen- 
ins can add an additional one-third to home tuning. 



B A ! BASICS w« « 




It Happens Every Day.. .Millions Of Times 






Yep — the family goes to market in Hometown and 
Rural America and they really "live it up." Clean- 
ing tissue, automobile wax, hamburger and tender- 
loin, toothpaste and toiletries. You name it . . . 
they've got it at home and they buy it in huge 
quantities. Here is a rich and responsive market 
better and more effectively covered by the Keystone 
Broadcasting network than by any other adver- 
tising medium. Here is a market that TV overlooks! 



• WRITE, WIRE OR PHONE FOR 



CH I CAGO 

HI West Washington St. 

STate2 6303 

LOS AN G ELES 

3142 Wilshire Blvd. 
Dunkirk 3 2910 



NEW YORK 

580 Filth Avenue 
Plaza 71460 

SAN FRAN CISCO 

57 Post Street 
SUtter 1-7440 



Nice thing about Keystone is that you don't buy 
speculatively. You can cut and try. You can pick 
a group of eighty or eight hundred markets and 
discover quickly whether 15 minutes across the 
board will do the job or whether spots will move t be 
merchandise and at a greatly reduced cost. The 
KEYSTONE story is a juicy one. It's all meat and 
no bone, fat or gristle. Why not let us tell you how 
we can serve you? 






|X^*TAKE YOUR CHOICE 

A handful of stations or the network . . . 
a minute or a full hour . . . it's up to 
Y,ou, your needs. 

|x"**>*ORE FOR YOUR DOLLAR 

No premium cost for individualiied pro- 
gramming. Network coverage for less 
than "spot" cost for some stations. 

IS*' O NE ORDER DOES THE JOB 
All bookkeeping and details are done 
by KEYSTONE, yet the best time and 
place are chosen for you. 







THE VOICE 



\oF HOMETOWN AN 



RURAL AMERICA 



11 JULY 1955 



197 







1. How does network radio compare with other media as to cost? 



SOURCE: CBS Radio Network research, May 1955 



People reached per advertising dollar spent, 
national advertising media, December 1954 



MEDIA 



ALL NETWORK RADIO 



ALL NETWORK TV 



MAJOR MAGAZINES 



PEOPLE PER DOLLAR 



575 



356 



277 



Radio efficiency: On a conservative basis (see below) network radio reaches 61.5' i more 
people-per-dollar than network tv, and nearly HO^r more than the top U.S. magazines. 

SOURCES OF DATA: 



Radio: "All Network Radio" data are based on 722 broadcasts, or 72% of all rated broadcasts whose 
ratings and estimated time and production costs were listed by NRI for the two-week report period ending 
11 December 1954. All calculations are by CBS Radio Network research. 

Homes-per-dollar data were weighted by the number of broadcasts for each program. Listeners-per-100 homes 
based on Multi-Market Pulse. November-December 1954. 



Television: "All Network Tv" data are based on 607 broadcasts for which ratings and cost data were available 
in NTI for two weeks ending 11 December 1954; these 607 broadcasts represented 80 r r of all rated broadcasts. 
Homes-per-dollar data were weighted by the number of broadcasts for each program. Number of viewers-per-home 
is from ARB-TV National report for December 1954. 



Mazazines: Data are for seven leading publications (Life, Look. Sat. Eve. Post, Colliers, Good Housekeeping. 
Ladies' Home Journal, Woman's Home Companion). Average for one-page and two-page ads, including black-and- 
white, two-color, four-color and bleed. ABC circulation as of 30 June 1954. Readers-per-copy from Magazine 
Audience Group Study, 1949. Percent ad-noting from Starch Adnorms Report. July '53-June r 54; men and 
women noting for four general magazines, women only for three women's magazines. Space costs are one-time rates 
in effect or announced for April 1955; production costs excluded. 

Noters-per-dollar data for each magazine were weighted bv the number of ads of each kind and size reported by Starch. 



8 /; fl \ >'i p. i- ?!f<! I naae 9 

i: I': '-A-.:} U ft g i \f o fuye Cf 




...and growing every day! 



AGRICULTURE 

OIL AND URANIUM 

MANUFACTURING 

TOURISTS 



The Western M 




Served and Sold by 



® 



^ 



Delivers Boom-Town Denver ond 302 counties in 12 slates (Nielsen) 



Is the leader in creating local programs and personalities (or 
Western tastes. 



©Serves a farm and ranch population of 700,030 with 18 hours 
per week of informative ond entertaining agricultural programs. To 
many of these listeners, KOA has long been their only day-in, 
doy-out source of vital news and weather information. 



Population . 
Households 
Radio Homes 
Buying Income 
Retail Sales 



FARM 
700,030 
191,140 
175,850 



TOTAL 
3.633,000 
1,088,420 
1,049,020 



$2,044,714,000 $5,226,724,000 
$4,071,951,000 



Source. 1955 Survey of Buying Power 



(^ 



Is heard by more people who can't get TV than ony radio station 
in the U.S. A ! 



1^) 



Sells this ever-increasing market, developing and keeping 
phenomenal listener-loyalty, as proved by 39% greater moil response 
in 1954 over 1953. 




LET KOA SELL FOR YOU! 



DENVER 

Covers The West 8^tf 



NBC • 850 kc . 50.000 WATTS • CALL PETRY 



11 JULY 1955 



Send us your name and address for monthly factual 
"Western Market" information folder. 

199 



-A 



2. What is the cost-per-1,000 of the three basic network buys? 



SOURCE: NBC Radio Research Department, January 1955 



ICVMC BUY 



NETWORK DAYTIME 
QUARTER-HOUR 
STRIP PROGRAM 



PENETRATION 


WEEKLY IMPACT 

More than mx commer- 
cials heard per daytime 
listener weekly. 
33,200,000 commercial 
impressions 


COST-PER-1,000 


1 week 


1,145,000 




1 weeks 


homes 
8,083,000 


66c-per-l,000 
impressions 




homes 






BASIC BUY If 

NETWORK EVENING 
HALF-HOUR 
ONCE WEEKLY 



PENETRATION 



1 week L. 550,000 

homes 

1 weeks 3.600,000 

homes 



WEEKLY IMPACT 

More than 2V> commer- 
cials heard per evening 

radio listener. 
6.327,000 commercial 
impressions 



COST-PER-1,000 



Sl.58-per-l.0i to 
impressions 



BASIC BUY f^ 

THREE SCATTERED 
NETWORK RADIO 
PARTICIPATIONS 



PENETRATION 

1 week _ ...4,082,000 

homo 

4 weeks ...7307.000 

homes 



WEEKLY IMPACT 

More than 1.2 commer- 
cial- heard per radio 
listener. 

6.857,000 commercial 
impressions 



COST-PER-1,000 



Sl.28-per-l.000 
impressions 



Basic network buys, as chart above compiled by NBC radio presentations shown to agencies. Source of home 
Radio reveals, can deliver a thousand listener impressions data is Nielsen's NRI, whose homes-reached figures were 
for as little as 66c. The\ are part of recent four-network multiplied bv Pulse listeners-per-set averages for chart. 



3. How does network radio compare with network tv on a cost basis? 

SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen, January-February 1955 NRI average network program 



Cost-per-1,000 commercial minutes 



Radi 



DAYTIME 



NIGHTTIME 



Radio vs. tv: Daytime television costs 50% more than 
davtime radio network shows in order to reach the average 
home with one minute's worth of commercial in a network 
program. Nighttime tv also lags behind nighttime radio on 
the same efficiency yardstick. TVs nighttime "cost-per-1,000 



SI. 04 



$2.50 



81.56 



83.29 



commercial minutes" is 32'. higher than radio's. This cost 
measurement is a Nielsen concept designed to make longer- 
length shows with longer commercials comparative with 
shorter network programs containing more brief commer- 
cials. It draws comparison of spectacular*, soap opera. 



RADIO BASICS p^ocio 



FIRST IN SPRINGFIELD 






AUDIENCE ACCEPTANCE 



MONDAY THROl GH 
SAT1 \i\)\\ 


WTXL 


"A" 


"B" 


4ip" 


"D" 


■1 


"1 ■'*" 


"G" 


"H" 


Ollin 

VMS 

1 \I 


7:ini \.\I.-1J NOON 


!'::.! 


20.6 


l 1 ).:: 


13.1 


7.9 


4.6 


2.7 


L.6 


0.7 


0.5 


12:00 NOON-6:00 P.M. 


33.1 


16.0 


12.1 


14.7 


7.6 


7.3 


4.2 


1 1 


2.0 


1.7 


f):00 l\\l..."..un P.M. 


34.0 


:'<).: 


17.5 


8.4 


7.1 


10.5 1 


0.4 


1.1 



Spriimficid. \Ia-- acliusetts. Novemlicr ]').>! Hooper 



V ADVERTISER ACCEPTANCE 



ACCOUNT 

Ballantine Reer 

Blue Cross Blue Shield 

Bond Brrail 

Camels 

Clapp's Baby Foods 

( lolonna Cheese 

Colgate Shai ing Cream 

Daw son's Beer 

Ford Motor Co. 

Hathawaj Bread 

llo»te~s ( lake- 

Hudson Papa Napkins 

Ladies Home Journal 

Life Magazine 

I ,0( w's 



'Jan.- June, 1955) 



AGENCY 
\\ iiliam Esty Co. 

Sutherland Abbott 

B. B. I). <). 

\\ iiliam Esty Co. 

Young & Rnbicam 

Paris & Peart 

Bryan Houston 

K'-in^olil & *'n. 

J. Salter Thompson 

Bresnick Co. 

Ted Bates 

Bii'u . Biern, Toigo 

B. B. 1). o. 

Young & Rubicam 

l>"i 'I & i '">■ 



ACCOUNT 



Mass. !>'!>t. oi I omm 
National Biscuit Co. 
National Eletr. < >>ntr. Vsso. 
New England Tel. 8 Tel 
Pall Mai] 
Readers Di 
Rheingold Beer 
Robert Hall 

Ruppert"- B< I I 

Sanka < loffee 
Saturday Evening Post 
Silicare 
Simonize 

Sun Oil Co. 

I'urtle \\ ,i\ 

\\ i. nil. r Bn id 



AGENCY 

Jam- I is ( liirui.' 

Mi ' u n-EricksoD 
Fuller, Smith & B - 
Harold < 
5. S. C & B 
b & !'•• 
I oa ( B 

S 'Inn 
Biow. Bi 
Young & Kui 

B B D 
traub 
- S 

Ru!lir3' 

w . B D 




MEMBER STATION 



For avails and ntlier information, 
.all I.arrs Reilly, Gen. M_r . WTXL, 
Springfield, Mass., RE-9-4768 <>r an) 
office of the Walker Representation 
Company. 




11 JULY 1955 



201 




to do real selling . . .to achieve continuo\ 

big season (and small fortune) elsewhei 

CBS Radio Network, where they'll be makin 

50$ a thousand. . . and they'll have U\ 

customers what to ask for when they 






till the most attractive way 

VJosnre, economically. After spending a 
zazel Bishop will now be selling on the 
ynmercial minute impressions for less than 
l \ferent occasions every week to tell the 




tning this summer. Hazel Bishop will sell cosmetics on 11 ends U arren and the News, and the new.- mtda/ternoon 
f Robbins Show on CBS Radio. Other major purchases recently made on CBS Radio. McKesson & Robbiru. now sponsoring 
Godfrey Digest Friday evenings. F II iloolworth ^^^^< "ompany . sponsoring the hour-long Sunday afternoon musical 
\am, The U'oolworth Hour. Amoco, also on Sunda\'^^ ^^ afternoons with Rhythm on the Road. 




6. How much spot radio is needed to reach "saturation" levels? 



SOURCE: Various Colgate agencies; SPONSOR research 



You need announcements totaling 
this number of rating points to , , . 



400 



140 



40 




. . . REACH 25% of radio homes .... 50% of radio homes ...... 



75% of radio homes 



CHART ABOVE is based on formula developed as planning aid 
for Colgate's ad agencies. Note that spot frequency is geometric; 
to triple homes-reached, you must boost spot frequency about 10 



times. Rating point levels in chart refer to simple arithmetic sum of 
ratings of time slots you're buying in major city. Formula is guide, 
not absolute, but most veteran timebuyers use comparable formulas. 



5. What are the costs of spot radio campaigns in top markets? 

SOURCE: "Spot Radio Guide, Free & Peters, based on A.C. Nielsen NCS data, current radio rates for highest-cost stations. 

Markets 13 Weeks 26 Weeks 39 Weeks 



DAYTIME 



NIGHTTIME 



The Top 
50 

75 

100 

125 

161 

50 

75 

100 

125 

161 

50 

75 

100 

125 

161 

50 

75 

100 

125 

161 



20 Daytime Minutes Per Week 

$458,234.40 __ _. $ 801,910.20.... $1,202,865.30 

558,864.80 978.0 1 3.40 ._ 1,467,020. 10 

644,727.20 _ 1,128,272.60. 1,692.408.90 

702,353.60 1 .229,1 18.80 1,843,678.20 

794,447.68.. 1.390,283.44 2,979,178.80 

20 Daytime Station Breaks Per Week 

$350,261.60.. $ 612,957.80 .... $ 919.436.70 

439,088.00 _ 768.404.00 1.152.216.00 

509,454.40 .. 891,545.20 1.337,317.80 

564,990.40 988,733.20 1,483,099.80 

651,499.68 ... 1,140,124.44 1,710,186.66 



81,603,820.40 
1.956.026.80 

. 2.356,545.20 
2.458.237.60 
3,972.238.40 

SI, 225.915.60 

1.536,288.00 

1.783.090.40 

1.977,466.40 

. 2.280,248.88 



10 One-Minute Nighttime Announcements Per Week 



$324,773.28. 
396,095.44 
456,950.52 



577.374.72 

704.169.44.. _ 

812.356.48 



497,792.88 884.965.12 

563,064.84 1,001,004.16. 



$ 866.062.08 .... 
.... 1,056,254.16 .... 
._ 1,218,534.72 
.... 1,327,447.68 . 
_ 1,501.506.24 

10 Nighttime Station Breaks Per Week 

$275,831.01 ..$ 490,366.24 $ 735,549.36. 

345,781.80 675,123.80 - . 1,012.685.70 

401,134.50 .... 713,128.00 1,069,692.00 .... 

444,929.94 790,986.56 1,186.479.84 .... 

513.055.53 ... 912.098.72 1.368.148.08 



$1,010,405.76 
1,232.296.52 
1.421.623.84 
1,548.688.96 
1.751.757.28 

8 858.140.92 

1.25 1.642.48 
1,247.974.00 
1.384.226.48 
1.596,172.76 



"Prices shown are maximum, unadjusted (no discount; figured) rates on highest-cost outlets. 



''■ '<■■ '>, ft 
H '■/■ '■ '■'/ 



',/, •>'■ ■•>. '. 



page 11 



WPEN 

Shows the greatest rating increase 
of any station in Philadelphia" 

PuU« Jiui.Fch. 75/ -'55 



x\ 



AGAIN! 

In the latest Pulse period 

WPEN 

shows the 

Greatest Rating Increase 

of any station in 

Philadelphia* 



Represented Nationally by Gill-Perna 

'Pulse March- April 1954 
March- April 1955 



11 JULY 1955 



205 




o \ bitting* 



1. How much money (gross) has been invested in net radio ('50-'55) ? 



SOURCE: Publishers Information Bureau 



NETWORK 







1950 



$35,124,624 



$70,744,669 



$16,031,977 



$31,397,650 



I95I 



$33,708,846 



$68,784,773 



$17,900,958 



$54,324,017 



1952 



$35,023,033 



$59,511,209 



$20,992,109 



$47,927,115 



1953 



$29,826,123 



$62,381,207 



$23,176,137 



$45,151,077 



1 954 



$29,051,784 



$54,229,997 



$20,345,032 



$34,014,356 



1955 
First 3 Months 



$7,320,805 



$12,524,418 



$4,109 ; 505 



$8,282,310 



YEARLY TOTALS 



J193Q\ $27,694,090 iJS^M $187,800,329 



(19351 $49,293,901 

fl9H/l $96,455,603 




Qjgg 




$183,358,920 



$174,718,594 



[19521 $163,453,466 
/l953l $160,534,544 
JJ954J $137,641,169 



2. How much have advertisers spent for spot radio time ('50-'55) ? 



SOURCES: Federal Communications Commission; SPONSOR estimates 

145 
125 
105 

85 

65 I 

45 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



MILLIONS 




1954 



$104,759,761 $108,314,507 $118,823,880 $119,559,000 $123,658,000 $135,000,000 $138,000,000' 

Dollar figures show national spot revenues of stations AFTEB trade discounts of fre- "SPONSOR estimate based on industry and station rep forecasts. 

quency and dollar volume: BEFORE commissions to reps, agencies, brokers. 



it <\ ■->. '. y '/ n « '. V 4 | puyv ±a 



Where listening gains most 
WOLF has the most . 



(3-TO-6 P.M 



• • 



RADIO SETS IN USE — |AN TO APRIL 



Station WOLF 

leads all stations 

with 38.2% of 

the audience; 

ncarly twice its share. 



1954 1955 



1955 ABOVE OR 
(BELOW 1954i 



3.00 
3:30 


7.5 
7.5 


9.5 
8 3 


26.7 
10.7 


4:00 
4:30 


7.2 
6.2 


9.6 
13.3 


33.3 
114 5 


5:00 
5:30 


9.0 
12.5 


12.4 
13.8 


37.8 

-f 104 



HOOPER RATINGS 

STATION WOLF 
RATING SHARE 



1 



2 6 
3.0 


27 3 
36 4 


4 3 
6.3 


44 9 
47.4 


4.8 
4.8 


38 7 
34.7 



( 



SPRING 
1955 



POPULATION • LABOR FORCE 
AUTOMOBILES • BUSINESS FIRMS 
MONTHLY SALES COMPARISONS 
INDUSTRIAL WORK HOURS 
SALES ESTIMATES 
TELEPHONES 

HOOPER DATA 

HOME LISTENING 

AUTO LISTENING 

STORE LISTENING 

4 YEAR TRENDS 

8 YEAR AUDIENCE TREND 

T V. OPERATING HOURS 

4 YEAR SETS-IN-USE 

COMPARISON BY Vi HOURS 

SEPTEMBER - DECEMBER INDEX 

PROGRAM SCHEDULE 

RATE CARD 

WOLF SPONSOR BREAKDOWN 

FIELD INTENSITY MAP 



&%**** - 




m?°" pl pr 



NATIONAL SALES REPRESENTATIVES -THE WALKER COMPANY 



REGIONAL W W 1$ NOW 









^j**-' 






mf • ^v 



$ *>4 BltUOH 
AlflRKO. 



*. 








.^' 



BASIC 



CBS 



RADIO 



2$ 



***** 



...A 



BJ ST D-J's 





IN OMAHA 

and in 

170 RICH 
COUNTIES 

(One-third in rich Western Iowa!) 



Tops in Every Way . . . that's Radio WOW . . . 
now proudly a basic CBS Radio affiliate. 

Top WOW personalities . . . great names like 
"Jolly Joe" Martin . . . Connie Cook . . . Mai 
Hansen . . . and Ray Clark . . . are eager to sell 
your product! 

Radio WOW is a top buy ... a must basic buy 
in every national schedule! 

Call your John Blair man today! 



Frank P. Fogarty, Vice Pres. & Gen. Mgr. % Represented by John Blair & Co. 
Affiliated with "Better Homes & Gardens" and "Successful Farming" Magazines. 



"Regional 

RADIO 



WOW 



Dial 590 

5000 WATTS 



OMAHA 









208 



SPONSOR 



1955 I II I FACTS B W "> SKI IH'\ 



& 




time buying 




) 



40,000-word book-digest of 13 RTES seminars 



Seminar 



I 



Seminar £,, 

Seminar J, 

Seminar *T. 

Seminar O. 

Seminar 0. 

Serninar /. 

Seminar O. 

Seminar y. 

Seminar [[). 

Seminar [ 1 . 

Seminar \£. 

Seminar iCi. 



Page 

The basics of audience measurement 2 

Pitfalls-pratfalls in audience research 4 

Guides to more effective timebuying 8 

How to engineer a good buj 10 

know your markets 13 

Vgencj practice aints and sinners lb 

Whal buyers, sellers expect <>l each other 19 

How networks work; bow lo buj them 22 

Can yon do better with spot? 26 

Whal «lor- coverage cover? 29 

Does merchandising sell merchandise? 32 

Discussion of the \KK Report 34 

There's a rainbow in your future 37 



Reprints will be ntade available in naafclel farm. Price per copu 92. QmntifH rates 
on request. Write to Sponsor Services, inc.. 10 E. tftth St.. \etv 1 ark 17. V >. 



timebuying 
BASICS 



First practical 
textbook (40,000 
words) on tv 
and radio buying 



Here for the first time is the world of radio and television timebuying — in breadth 
and depth — as seen by America's foremost experts in the field. On succeeding pages 
are edited transcripts of the 13 seminars held under the auspices of the Radio and 
Television Executives Society of New York. Objective of RTES was to provide the 
thousands of timebuyers of the U.S. and Canada with best possible radio and tv 
timebuying background and tips. This book within a book will prove of excep- 
tional value to everyone identified with radio and television and interested in its 
problems and their solutions. (Timebuying Basics reprints will be made available.) 

RTES TIMEBUYING SEMINAR COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND MODERATORS 




CLAUDE BARRERE. BMI Eastern 

director, tv ; chairman of KTKS 
seminar committee 



THOMAS McDERMOTT, N, W. 

Ayer, NY., vice president, radio 

and tv; moderator 



ROGER PRYOR. FC&B, NY., v.p 

radio- tv; RTES president during 

period of timebuying semihard 



MARY McKENNA. \VNE\Y. N.Y., 
director of research & sales develop 
ment ; committee member, moderator 



VERA BRENNAN. Scbeideler, Beck 

& Werner, N.T., head buyer; com 

niittee member, moderator 



FRANK PELLEGRIN. H R Reps. 

N.Y.. v.p.; committee member, 

and a moderator 



GORDON GRAY, \VOR and WOR- 

TY, New York, v.p. ; committee 

member, moderator 



FRANK SILVERNAIL. BBDO, 

NY., manager of station relations; 

committee member 



PAGE 1 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



Sent i 



nar I . 




THE BASICS OF MJDIENCE MEASUREMENT 

Speakers Ward Dorrell. vice president and researeli direc- 
tor, John Hlair and Co.; Donald Coyle. director of tell 
sion research. ABC. Moderator teas Gordon Gray, vice 

president-general manager wok and wok-tv. n. y. c. 



BISTOm OF RATINGS 

WARD DORRELL: Fan mail was one of 
the earliest methods of Judging program 
popularity, but it was soon evident that 
the people who wrote the station and 
network were not typical. Some better 
method of determining the listeners' 
likes and dislikes was mandatory, and 
upon this concept audience measure- 
ment was born. Have any of you who 
are harried, upset and bedeviled by the 
current confusion of audience measurements ever won- 
dered who started it all? Do you often wonder if his con- 
science bothers him? I don't know exactly who first 
thought of audience measurements, but in 1929 Archibald 
Crossley started using a telephone recall method asking 
respondents what programs they had heard the previous 
day. Not long after this the 4 A's and the ANA formed an 
organization called the Cooperative Analysis of Broadcast- 
ing, or "CAB." They initiated the first continuous plan 
for measuring program popularity and retained the Cross- 
ley Co. to produce the measurements. The operation was 
non-profit and reports went to members confidentially. 

This unaided recall system, making use of the telephone 
home sample, had obvious deficiencies. But it served the 
advertising agency and advertiser in limited fashion for 
approximately five years. 

About 1934 the firm of Clark-Hooper engaged in the 
measurement of newspaper and magazine readership, was 
invited by an advertiser to do a special survey of radio 
listening using the telephone home sample. They asked 
the respondent what they were listening to now, rather 
than during some previous span of time — and the coinci- 
dental method was born. Soon the method was expanded 
to 33 cities and the Hooperating popularity service became 
a strenuous competitor to the CAB. Many of you remem- 
ber The Green Pocket Piece. 

Alas, even then, as now, large differences were noted in 
comparisons of the competing ratings. Battle lines were 
drawn, and the war was on between "telephone recall" 
and "telephone coincidental." We might refer to it as the 
Twenty Years War, for it is still continuing with other 
contenders in the lists, replacing the vanquished. 

The mechanical recorder reared its electronic head 
about 1943 sponsored by the A. C. Nielsen Co. They were 
engaged in producing a Food and Drug Index upon a large 
scale serving manufacturers of food and drug products, 
and they entered the radio audience measurement field 
with the Nielsen Radio Index produced by the Audimeter. 
The recorder provided the industry with a projectable sam- 
ple, whereas the Hooper method was confined to reporting 
relative popularity between programs and networks. The 
competition was rife between the so-called "national rat- 
ings." About 1950 Nielsen and Hooper made a deal and 
Hooper withdrew from the national field, abandoning his 
36-city Popularity Ratings upon payment by Nielsen. 

While the coincidental rating was in its hey-day, pub- 
lishing a so-called "national rating." the growth of the co- 
incidental rating as a measurement of local station popu- 
larity grew rapidly. The evolution of these city reports was 
a logical outgrowth of the 33 < later 36 ) city ratings. The 
number of calls was relatively low but by accumulating the 



Inten lews foi i Dve-month b 

to report thl 

The tample 
broadca I time 
nlng" were n poi ted Bui 
the mea lurei to repo 
using iub- ample, until I 
mum "conclusive" be 

the tattoo during the middli Portii 
grew and grew I I • 11 
projected to the number of U 
Man', aid that i 

duced n v.a . ancient 

measurer for more frequ Una mi 

base of approximately 22 -railed ;; 

od were publi bed. But the station sul 

the Instability ol mea ur< mi nl i upon 

and a variety of arrangemenl made to ampllfj 

ample size, During this period tl j popula 

rating was sold to Nielsen and the 
conducted in these , as abandoned. I 

were on their own and able to order reports based upon 
sample sizes according to their desires and ook. 

Dr. Sydney Roslow— encouraged by the shortcon I 
the telephone coincidental — introduced the P i .rts 

in 1941. Durum this year Dr. Roslow conducted three or 
four experimental studies in audience research, perfecting 
the roster technique with financial support of a half-do 
broadcasting organizations. In October, he launched 1 
Pulse of New York as a new audience research organiza- 
tion, with four of his summer clients — NBC. CBS. WNEW 
and WOV as regular subscribers. 

The technique then used is substantially the same as 
that which The Pulse uses today. In the intervening years 
the sample size has increased, the number of day-parts 
stepped up from three to four and the quota sample - 
tem. which starts with a pre-conceived sample comprising 
the correct proportions of economic and other groi. 
changed to a probability sample method. This involves 
the random selection of every nth family in the area to be 
surveyed so that, while nothing is known in advance about 
any individual family, the overall sample is representative 
of all families in the area. Personal interviews and a 
house-to-house survey with a scientifically selected sample 
are the foundation of the Pulse surveys. 

During the period between 1940 and 1950 many cities 
accepted the Pulse technique. The basic reason for the 
growth was the inherent advantage of the technique in 
producing larger sample sizes than those commonly used 
by the telephone coincidental, the practicality of produc- 
ing more frequent reports, generally on a bi-monthly basis 
for the important markets, and the complete cross-sec 
of the market, rather than just the telephone homes. 
Today Pulse is produced in over 100 cities on a continuing 
basis, and is used by many advertising agencies and nets. 

While audience measurement history was being made 
the medium of television appeared on the scene. Experi- 
ments were made to obtain measurements of this new me- 
dium in a combined survey technique, using the one inter- 
view, whether telephone or personal, to produce the raw 
figures for both tv and radio reports. It was during I 
experimental procedure that much damage was done to 
the radio industry by incomplete measurements on a com- 
bined interview basis. The telephone technique was intro- 
duced using the now discarded and fallacious question. 
"Are you looking at television or listening to the radio 
just now?" and experiments were conducted by my com- 
pany that proved rather conclusively that this technique 
sold radio dowr. tie river, and gave television larger audi- 
ences than was actually the case. 

It was soon discovered that the only technique which 
was inherently satisfactory to measure both television 
audiences and radio audiences at the same time was the 
personal interview. The reason is simple, for when the in- 
terviewer is in the home it is easy to establish that the 



PAGE 2 



-. 



The 1954 Billion Dollar Club 



SALES OR REVENUES 
19S4 



General Motors Corp $9,824 

Standard Oil Co. (N.J.) 5,661 

Bell Telephone System 4,784 

Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. . . E4,000 

U.S. Steel Corp 3,241 

• Sears, Roebuck & Co 2,965 

General Electric Co 2,959 

•Swift & Co 2,511 

• Chrysler Corp 2,072 

► Armour & Co 2,056 

' Safeway Stores, Inc 1,814 

►E.'l. du Pont de Nemours & Co 1,709 

►Gulf Oil Co 1,705 

►Standard Oil (Ind.) 1,660 

Bethlehem Steel Corp 1,657 

► Westinghouse Electric Corp 1,631 

► Socony-Vacuum Oil Co 1,609 

► Texas Co 1 ,574 

► Shell Oil Co 1,312 

► National Dairy Products 1,210 

► Standard Oil (Calif.) 1,113 

► Kroger Co 1,109 

J. C. Penney Co 1,107 

► Goodyear Tire & Rubber 1,090 

^American Tobacco Co 1,069 

©Boeing Airplane Co 1,033 

► ©Sinclair Oil Corp 1,021 

► Ford Motor Co © 

E— Business Week Estimate 

©New member 

©Does not report sales, but is in billion class. 



1946 


% GROWTH 


dollars) 


SINCE 194* 


$1,963 


400.5 


1,622 


249.0 


2,094 


128.5 


1,435 


178.7 


1,496 


116.6 


1,045 


183.7 


679 


335.8 


1,308 


92.0 


870 


138.2 


1,184 


73.6 


847 


114.2 


662 


158.2 


562 


203.4 


651 


155.0 


788 


110.3 


378 


331.5 


761 


111.4 


587 


168.1 


443 


196.2 


742 


63.1 


373 


198.4 


574 


93.2 


677 


63.5 


617 


76.7 


859 


24.4 


14 





376 


171.5 


© 


© 




©BUSINESS WEEK 



BUSINESS WEEK • Apr. 23, 1955 




of the 



members of the 

Billion Dollar Club realize: 



rr No selling campaign is complete 



without the WBC stations 



>> 



In 1954, twenty -eight companies in the United States sold over a billion 
dollars' worth of goods each. These companies certainly know something 
about selling. And twenty-five of them were among the more than 250 
national advertisers on WBC. Keeping them company are lots of smaller 
guys who know something about advertising, too. Over 1,200 local 
advertisers put WBC in their selling campaigns. 

National advertisers know that 1 6 of America's sales are made in 
the six markets served by the WBC stations . . . that they need the 
WBC stations to complete their selling campaign. And local advertisers 
have found that no other station gives them the coverage and sales 
impact of their WBC station. If your selling campaign doesn't include 
the WBC stations, call Eldon Campbell, WBC National Sales Manager 
at MUrray Hill 7-0808, New York, or your WBC station. 



W 



0® 



WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 

WBZ + WBZA • WBZ-TV, Boston; KYW • WPTZ, Philadelphia. KOKA • KOKA-TV. Pittsburgh; 

wowo, tort Wayne; kex, Portland; kpix, San Francisco 

KPIX represented by Thk Katz Agency, Inc. 

All other WBC stations represented by Free & Peters, Inc. 




PAGE 3 



home is a television home, and to conduct the complete 
radio interview before going on to the tv interview. There 
is not the possibility of the respondent being too eager to 
report their tv viewing and neglect the fact of radio lis- 
tening as was the case with the combined telephone inter- 
view. In fact, it is only because the interviewer is in the 
home that she can probe as she must, to elicit all of the 
radio listening that takes place in multiple-set homes to- 
day. It is believed even today with the abandonment of 
the combined telephone tv and radio question that the 
telephone interview is incapable of obtaining all the facts 
on radio listening, not only in the home but "out-of- 
home" listening. 

A recent release by Pulse, Inc. which reports the out-of- 
home-audience states that the increase due to out-of-home 
listening adds 23.8% to the in-home sets in use. Projected 
nationally, these results would indicate that any time of 
day over 2.000,000 families are listening out-of-home. 

We are now entering the history of confusion on the 
part of the user of audience measurements. Confusion 
established by attempting to report the listening and look- 
ing audience on small inadequate samples, of a limited 
area of station coverage and by the use of techniques that 
cannot elicit the facts of entire radio listening. 

Certain basic changes were made in the Hooper tech- 
nique, particularly in the production of television reports. 
After the exposure of the inadequacies of dual telephone 
questions in the interview, Hooper started using diaries in 
conjunction with the telephone coincidental, using the 
telephone calls to adjust the responses from the diary 
homes. The coincidental telephone portion of this com- 
bined technique is still used to provide limited city reports 
of radio listening. Smaller and smaller samples are being 
attempted to report radio and it is my belief that in many 
cases estimates resulting from this limited sample have in- 
herent statistical variations much too large to make these 
reports particularly usefuK If you want to learn more, and 
every user of audience measurements should have consid- 
erable knowledge of the standard error inherent in all 
sampling operations, I _ suggest you get a booklet produced 
fcy my firm which treats this subject in detail, providing 
you with simple charts from which you can judge the re- 
liability of measurements based on various sample sizes. 

To those of you who are using audience measurements in 
your daily activities, I suggest that before you use the fig- 
ures in these reports as categorical measurements of audi- 
ence size, you keep in mind that all are based on some 
form of sampling, and it is axiomatic that all forms of 
sampling have inherent statistical errors. Keep in mind 
that these figures are only estimates, having a wide range 
of possible variation, and that many other factors should 
be considered before you bass serious decisions involving 
many thousands of dollars of your client's money on them. 



WHY RATINGS DIFFER 

DONALD COYLE: It is stimulating for 
me to work in an industry which un- 
questionably spends more money than 
most other industries for research per- 
formed outside the realm of the "labo- 
ratory." And like all researchers, I re- 
sent the gibes (whether real or un- 
founded) which are made about the art 
we are discussing here today. 

Some weeks ago an article appeared 
in a leading national magazine which, while extremely 
damaging, summed up neatly all of the broadcasting in- 
dustry's own unfavorable thoughts and expressions on 
"The Tv Numbers Game." 

In the preparation of the story, interviews were sought 
with some of television's recognizable talent, as well as 
some of the so-called experts in the field of ratings re- 
search. Here are some of the revealing comments which 
appeared in print: 
A network official: "You won't learn anything from rat- 




ings. One rating service has you No. 3 just behind / Love 
Lucy and Dragnet; but another, which is supposed to be 
measuring the same audience, has you No. 24." 

A tv performer: "It's just like you go to Lindy's Restau- 
rant and see three people eating sour cream and then you 
say 'Everyone in the United States eats sour cream'." 

The Author: "Broadcasting executives are aware of a 
deep-rooted fear of the rating services throughout the in- 
dustry, based on a suspicion that harm can come to those 
who criticize the system." 

It sounds like chaos; it most certainly is confusion. "Who 
knows who's on top?" 

Fortunately, several years ago, the industry took steps to 
"get its own house in order" through the Advertising Re- 
search Foundation. At that time subscribers were polled 
to determine what projects the Foundation should under- 
take first. The resulting vote showed an overwhelming 
desire for a study of the widely divergent radio and tele- 
vision rating methods and results, and so the first study 
was begun. The culmination of two years of work is 
soon to be out. (Editor's note: published December 1954.) 

Basically, there are three reasons for differences in audi- 
ence measurements: 

Difference of . . . 

1. Method: such as the technique employed in gather- 
ing data; elapsed time between broadcast exposure and the 
act of obtaining the audience information; and the type of 
measurement reported. 

2. Sample: such as type of sample employed, sample 
size and geographical area covered. 

3. Procedure and processing: such as handling of tabu- 
lations, reporting period used and the particular broad- 
casts covered. 

Bearing in mind these three fundamental factors which 
can cause rating divergences, I would like to discuss brief- 
ly the two tv national audience measurement services with 
which we, at ABC, are principally concerned — the Ameri- 
can Research Bureau and the A. C. Nielsen Co. 

As to method: ARB employs diaries. National reports 
are issued monthly, covering a one-week period which is 
usually the first week of every month. Reports for alter- 
nate-week programs are issued also, based on a smaller 
sample. 

Nielsen uses a metering device which records tuning ac- 
tivity on a receiver. The published national Radio and 
Television Reports cover broadcasting activity for a two- 
week period. Nielsen reports this activity during all but 
four weeks a year. 

As to sample selection: The universe for the ARB na- 
tional sample is the entire United States. A completely 
new sample is chosen every month. The sample is selected 
so that every television home in the country (insofar as 
possible) has an equal chance of being selected. 

All diaries are mailed to tv homes which have indicated 
no disinclination about accepting a diary. Where possible 
a telephone request occurs on the day before the diary 
week is to begin and again during the middle of the week. 
In areas which cannot be reached by interviewers a pre- 
mium device is used to insure cooperation. Self-mailers 
accompany the diaries and the families are requested to 
return them to ARB at the end of the survey week. 

Final tabulations are usually based on 1,700 or 1.800 
completed diaries, although as many as 2,800 are some- 
times mailed out. 

Unlike ARB, the basic Nielsen sample was chosen only 
once. Here, too, the sample was selected so that every 
home in the United States had the same probability of 
being chosen (with the exception of the Mountain Zone 
which Nielsen, for economic reasons, has omitted from 
his sample) . In order to obtain wide geographical disper- 
sion, a 451-county sample was chosen. 

Inducements are offered to participating homes in the 
form of premiums. In addition, I understand, the Nielsen 
Co. offers to pay 100% of cost of maintaining the radio 
sets in working order; 50% of the similar cost for tv sets. 

In the case of the mailable Audimeter, in which the 




Most comprehensive survey 
ever made of a radio audience 



There's a new report out on radio listening. 
Advertisers will find it absorbing . . . for a good 
many reasons. 

• It measures audience quality as well as quantity. 

• It measures station preference as well as pro- 
gram preference. 

• It measures listening habits 24 hours a day, 
upstairs, downstairs, indoors and out. 

• Its sample is big so big that the report is 
conclusive, definitive. 

The survey was made by Alfred Politz 
Research, Inc., in an area that includes parts of 
four states. There are 197 radio stations to choose 
from in that area. But survey results show that 



41.4 per cent of the adult listening audience is 
tuned daily to one station — WJR, Detroit. 

Whether it's news, drama, farm reports, sports, 
homemaking shows, music, or variety — makes no 
difference. Morning, afternoon, evening, all night 
— no difference. The overwhelming percentage of 
people prefers WJR. 

That's because WJR is a radio station with a 
personality. The personality accounts for circula- 
tion -millions of steady listeners who tune to 
WJR for the kind of programming they want. 

The Politz report is fascinating — don't fail to 
read it! Either write WJR, Detroit 2. Michigan, or 
ask your local Henry I. Christal Company repre- 
sentative for a free copy. 



The Great Voice of the Great Lakes 

WW ^J I^K Detroit 

50,000 Watts CBS Radio Netuvrk 



for your advertising dollar . . . th. 
That's the new. frwt WJR-Palitz Survey. Get it 
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11 JULY 1955 



215 



1 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



sample home is required to mail the filled cartridge back 
and replace it with the new cartridge, 50c is offered per 
replacement. Where tape Audimeters are still being used, 
a Nielsen representative calls every two weeks, removing 
the consumed tape and installing new tape. 

As to the data they produce: Both ARB and Nielsen re- 
port audience data on a household base, with the former 
reporting viewing data as recorded by sample homes and 
the latter reporting set tuning activity as it takes place 
within the home. Both techniques theoretically can mea- 
sure all household sets, with Nielsen's sample currently 
limited to program data on a maximum of five receiver 
units; two of which can be tv sets. 

Both report a cumulative-type audience figure: ARB, the 
total number of different households viewing for each 15- 
minute segment measured, or for shorter periods when 
programs of lesser duration are involved; Nielsen, the total 
number of homes tuned six minutes or more to a given 
broadcast. In addition, Nielsen can produce average in- 
stantaneous audience figures as well as total cumulative 
figures for the duration of a program or a segment of time. 

Both services can report unduplicated household audi- 
ence data for two or more broadcasts, with ARB being 
limited to the measured week of broadcast activity. Both 
organizations report program audience characteristics — 
Nielsen based upon households and ARB based on viewer 
characteristics. 

Here, briefly, are some of the typical applications of 
audience material by a network. 

Station Relations: Principal interest is at the local level, 
particularly with reference to the relationship of local rat- 
ings with national data. Such information as can be sup- 
plied us by ARB is extremely helpful in examining the 
relative strengths and weaknesses of our affiliates in deliv- 
ering audiences to a network program. Where delayed 
time periods have to be purchased, very interesting an- 
alyses are possible against "new" competition. Often 
trends are more readily discernible which occasionally lead 
to scheduling changes and perhaps even format changes. 

Then, too, there is always the problem of station rates 
and compensations, on which recommendations from Re- 
search are possible only after an analysis of delivered 
audiences for stations of comparable size in somewhat 
similar markets. 

Programing : Here principal interest lies in the so-called 
"popularity" reports as published by Trendex and Nielsen, 
the latter under the name Multi-Network Area Report. 
Each program trend which develops is quickly noted and 
digested by management, whether it be caused by the en- 
trance of a new show in a time period, a format change 
or a time period shift. Trendex, which employs the tele- 
phone coincidental technique, is our principal source for 
this type of information. 

Trends are later reviewed in light of published Nielsen 
data which, although slower in arrival, lends itself more 
fully to special analysis work. 

Sales: A program's full audience size measurement is of 
major import to the sales department. All favorable data 
are funneled to this unit whether it be a good cost-per- 
1,000 study on the Breakfast Club; relative rating gains 
against competitive net shows; or the story of the large 
cumulative audience reached by a weekend radio news 
package. 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Q. How is cost-per- 1,000 figured? 

A. (From Ward Dorrell) There are as many ways of 
figuring cost-per- 1,000 as there are people in this room. 
Basically, the formula is very simple. 

When you project your rating and you know from this 
projection the number of homes that are listening or look- 
ing at a program if you have that number in thousands, 
you simply divide it into the number of dollars. Divide 
dollars by the thousands of listeners, and you will have a 
PAGE 4 cost-per- 1,000. 



Q. Is that for number of homes or number of people? 
A. "From Ward Dorrell) What did you want, the num- 
ber, the cost-per- 1,000 homes or the cost-per-1,000 peo- 
ple? If you want the cost-per-1,000 people, then you con- 
vert homes into people. You can use your census defini- 
tion, 3.3 average people per home, or you can find a report 
which gives composition of the audience — the number of 
listeners per listening home. The Pulse report gives you 
listeners per listening home. I don't believe the Hooper 
reports do. If you know the exact number, the ARB Tv 
report gives you composition of audience, the number of 
listeners per set, so you can convert sets to listeners, or, 
if you wish, by applying an average factor which you get 
from census data, about 3.3. 

If you want it more specifically and the type of report 
that you use gives you audience composition and listeners 
and lookers per set, convert homes into people and divide 
people into dollars and you get cost-per-1,000 people. * * * 



Seminar 



2. 



PITFALLS AND PRATFALLS IN RESEARCH 

Participants in this seminar on audience ratings and 
rating services were Tom Lynch, Young & Rubicam media 
buyer with 19 years' experience; Lloyd Venard, president 
of the station representative firm of Venard, Rintoul & 
McConnell; and Dr. E. Lawrence Deckinger, vice president 
and research director of Biow-Beirn-Toigo and chairman 
of the Ratings Review Committee of the Advertising Re- 
search Foundation. Miss Mary McKenna, director of re- 
search and sales promotion at WNEW, New York, and 
formerly a Benton & Bowles timebuyer for many years, 
was moderator. 

Because of the integrated nature of this session and for 
clearest understanding of a complex subject, sponsor is 
presenting the commentary under four divisions: (A) 
meaning of ratings, (B) use of ratings, (C) calculations 
with ratings, and (D) questions and answers. 

A. MEANING OF RATINGS 

LARRY DECKINGER: What I say now 
concerns pitfalls that stem from a mis- 
understanding of the meaning of rat- 
ings. Let's remember that "ratings" are 
audience size measurements, nothing 
less and nothing more. 

One of our great difficulties is that 
we expect "ratings" to do more than 
they are intended to do. They are not, 
unfortunately, sales measurements. No 
one has yet figured out a way to get sales measurements 
from most programs for most products. And even if sales 
measurements were possible, we would want audience size 
measurements anyway. Audience size measurements tell 
us something about one of the elements that go into sales 
productivity. Instead of being so apologetic about what 
we don't have in this field we ought to be awfully grateful 
for the things we do have. 

Don't the other media wish they had half as many mea- 
surements as we have here in radio and television! Yet, 
somehow this seems to be open season for attacks on the 
ratings. There is the story that recently appeared in 
Collier's. I think that was a rather unfair attack on the 
ratings people. 

What causes all this trouble? 

What causes the confusion that's responsible for the at- 
tacks on what is really a good thing? Norman Glenn, the 
Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield Norm Glenn, at the 
Ohio State Conference recently said that the trouble is 
that the ratings services are measuring different things. 
He says that's why they get different results. Well, that is 
true. But we can't accept that as a full explanation. 




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11 JULY 1955 



217 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



You ask the ratings-maker how big is the audience for 
a program. That seems like a very simple question. But 
when you analyze the answers, and you find out why they 
are different, you find, as Mr. Glenn says, they are all 
answering somewhat different questions. 

It is sort of like getting up in the morning and asking 
your wife, "Is my face red?" and she were to say "Well, if 
it is, then you are wearing suspenders." You might be able 
to figure out what she is saying, but you would probably 
feel that she has answered your question in a rather pe- 
culiar way. 

And if she insisted on answering all your questions that 
way, you might proceed to have her head examined. 

Some of us feel from time to time that maybe we ought 
to have the ratings methods examined, we want to know 
more about why they are different. That is why the ARF 
appointed its Committee to study the ratings services, to 
help us get rid of some of the confusion. 

Ratings tools are not the beginning and end-all of any- 
thing. They are only indications. They are based on rela- 
tively small samples, and quite properly so. Nobody could 
afford to pay the cost that would be necessary to get big 
samples. So we have a sampling process, and we get these 
indications. And since they are only indications, they are 
not absolutely accurate. 

There are ranges of error about them. I hope you won't 
try to attach any false accuracy to ratings. If you don't, 
then you and ratings will get along just fine. 

The principal point is that the ratings are different be- 
cause they measure different things, and we wish they 
would measure the same thing. And you can do your share 
in getting them to measure the same thing if you will sup- 
port the ARF's suggestions when they are out. 



TOM LYNCH: An audience measure- 
ment is nothing but an audience mea- 
surement. Many people feel that a 
good rating or audience measurement 
will insure commercial selling. No one 
can be sure that commercial selling will 
be assured unless they have a good com- 
mercial and a good product to put 
across. 

Ratings are only evaluations — and no 
one should be a sliderule slave. Numbers are no substitute 
for thinking. They aid your ideas. Also don't forget pro- 
gram association. A cigar company recently bought a 
sports show that looked very good, should have covered 
everything they wanted, but it didn't sell cigars. When 
they got the audience composition figures they found that 
80% of this audience was children. 

Many people see a national rating and assume that they 
can use it for everything. I have noted buyers using na- 
tional rating services as the criterion in every individual 
market. See what the audience rating covers. 

B. USE AND MISUSE OF RATINGS 



LARRY DECKINGER: One point that should be consid- 
ered in the use and misuse of ratings is that one should 
be sure to use ratings in the environment in which they 
were obtained. That is to say, if you have a rating that 
was obtained in a certain market, it applies only to that 
particular market and not nationally. 

Second, don't use the numerical rating in a vacuum. If 
you are appraising a show, unfortunately, the rating alone 
won't do the whole job for you. The rating is not the re- 
sult of just one force. It is the result of a combination of 
forces. So it must be interpreted that way. 

What about the competition at that time? Maybe the 
show is a success, but the spot was a failure. What about 
the hour of broadcast? Maybe it was on too early or too 
late. What about the trend? Maybe its present rating is 
low, perhaps it is four times what it was about two months 
PAGE 5 ago. So it is going up. 




I remember some years ago I was asked for a flash state- 
ment on how the Inner Sanctum Show with Boris Karloff 
was doing. This was in the days of Hooper's 30-city rat- 
ings. So I looked up Boris Karloff. And there was Boris 
Karloff with a fat 0.3 rating. Of all the 100 or so shows 
on the air that Hooper was rating, that was the lowest. So 
I reported "Boris Karloff is the lowest-rated show on the 
air, I guess it isn't doing very well." 

Well, it so happened that that was Inner Sanctum's first 
rating for its first broadcast. We all know that Inner 
Sanctum grew and grew and grew to become one of the 
most durable shows on the air. I was evaluating Inner 
Sanctum in a vacuum. 

And that brings one to a third point in the misuse of 
ratings. Don't let anyone slip you just one rating for a 
show and try to get you to conclude something on the 
basis of that one rating. It can be a freak. 

Another point is this. Don't put all your eggs into one 
basket. I guess it would be grand if we had one method 
which would tell us everything. But unfortunately, there 
just isn't one such perfect method. There are things that 
one method tells us that other methods don't tell us. Now, 
it is true you can't buy every rating service. We have to 
make a decision on what we are going to buy, just as you 
do in your shops. You, of course, should buy what your 
research department suggests that you buy. 

When a station representative calls on you and shows 
you a figure for Y service and you are buying X service, I 
think generally it is a wrong thing to say, "We use X 
service in our shop, we don't use Y. You will have to take 
those figures to some other agency." I think it is wrong 
because no one method, at least at the present time, is that 
much better than the others. You should therefore have 
as much information as you can get to help you make as 
good a decision as you can when you buy. 

The ratings people really are very conscientious. I hope 
you believe me on that. They are very earnest and I don't 
say that just because they sell very conscientiously. They 
genuinely try to do a good job, and they are delighted to 
have you help them do it. 

TOM LYNCH: Dr. Deckinger mentioned the misuse of 
single ratings as the basis for a buy. One rating in a mar- 
ket is never any good. A good client had a habit of going 
out into the hinterlands and doing a little buying on his 
own. At one time a contract came back saying that this 
client had bought a radio baseball show. I looked it over 
and could find no reason whatsoever for his choice. Look- 
ing further, I found that the station had shown our client 
a 12 rating, which was very, very good. We dug deeper and 
found this rating was gotten on the day of a Dodger-Giant 
playoff game. Everyone who carried baseball got a rating 
that day. 

A buyer should know his client's marketing strategy. 
When using ratings, know whether it is advantageous to 
hit a smaller audience more often or a larger audience less 
often. 

In analyzing rating services, read all the fine print, 
whether local, national or regional. Different bases and 
formulas make for confusion. They also make a great dif- 
ference in many decisions. 

Seasonal variations in ratings are important. Some of 
the markets still only have two rating services a year, and 
you have to go back — if you are buying in the winter — to 
the previous winter for any indication. Yet by that time 
the program has changed, and everything about the mar- 
ket could be changed. 

Check all calculations on sales pitches. Usually the 
more complicated the figures, the more carefully they need 
analysis. 

In projection make sure that the service is projection- 
able, and if local that it is projectionable to city limits or 
station area. 

Take small rating changes with a grain of salt. As Ward 
Dorrell pointed out in the last meeting, the chance of error 
statistically is great depending on the size of the sample. 




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11 JULY 1955 



219 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 




LLOYD GEORGE VENARD: I am not 
an expert on ratings, but perhaps I can 
reflect some of the pitfalls that a sales- 
man runs into — the pitfalls for the 
salesman, and pitfalls for the buyers. 

I am going to confine myself strictly 
to spot because I don't get into the net- 
work picture. The first and the most 
important pitfall is failure to take into 
consideration the statistical variations. 
Statistical variations are based upon the law of permuta- 
tion, and the curve by which they are determined is based 
on a 1.9 sigma. Now, do we have that clear? Let's go 
ahead. 

I don't know what a 1.9 Sigma is, but if men like Deck- 
inger and Tom Lynch will take that kind of a definition, 
it must be right. 

When that chart that is in the back of many audience 
reports is analyzed and put into something that I can un- 
derstand, it means that a 5.0 can be as low as a 3.0 or as 
high as a 7.0. It means that a 3.0 can be as low as a 1.5 
or at high as a 7.0. It means that a 3.0 can be as low as a 
1.5 or as high as a 4.7. And that isn't a theory; that is an 
actual fact. 

Now here is how that is applicable when you are buying 
time. If you buy a 3.0 you might get a larger audience 
than when you buy a 5.0. And moreover the 3.0 show may 
be of a type reaching the audience that you want to reach 
while the 5.0 is not. 

There are certain products and certain conditions where 
this is especially true, for instance, women's shows, kid 
shows, teen shows. 

There is another pitfall on which all program salesmen 
will agree. The program changes that are made from the 
time a program survey is made and the time the figures 
got into your hands are enormous. If you are buying a 
participation show, is the program in the spot in which it 
was rated? Is the preceding program the same that was 
there when the rating was made? Is the following pro- 
gram the same? Are the preceding and the following pro- 
gram on the major important competitive stations un- 
changed? Did you get the date of the survey? 

Do you read the fine print in the surveys? That's im- 
portant — not because the survey organization wants to 
deceive you, but because the facts that they put in there 
are pertinent to each individual survey and each individual 
city. You have to know how many calls are made, how 
many reports are made, let us say, for each 15 minutes. 
If there are 300 reports made for each 15 minutes, and 
half of those are coincidental, there is going to be a larger 
variation than if 1,000 calls are reported for the same 15 
minutes. You can pretty well be sure the 5 rating in a 
1,000-call survey doesn't have the variation that would be 
indicated with a 300-call survey. 

Currently many timebuyers forget that radio ratings 
ignore out-of-home listening — that is, beach, club, schools, 
gasoline stations, public places, and, of course, automobile 
listening, which is enormous and very hard to tabulate. 

Here is another pitfall for both the salesman and buyer. 
Your Monday through Friday daytime ratings are average 
ratings Monday through Friday. Now, a program par- 
ticipation program could easily have a 10 four days a week 
and on Friday, because the competition has changed or 
because the preceding program is stronger or the follow- 
ing program is stronger, you could have a 35. When you 
get your Monday through Friday rating, the average will 
be 15. If you are not buying a strip five days a week and 
you are buying two days a week or three days a week, 
check show appeal carefully. A 10 and the 15 actually 
could average out four days a week to be the same audi- 
ence. 

Now another thing to watch if you accept a survey in 
-your agency is: in Boston they may make 300 calls or 300 
reports for 15 minutes, and in Miami they may make 
;l A O00. You cannot accept the same survey report for all 
.cities without an investigation into the individual report 
PAGE 6 for each city. 



I am going to touch on something that both Larry and 
Tom spoke about — the failure to read and know the indi- 
vidual research services, which is a fault not only of time- 
buyers but of representative salesmen and station people. 
There is a great deal of information if you will sit down 
and read those from cover to cover. 

One research service puts a little curlecue in their re- 
ports. I have asked at least 25 people in the last 15 years 
what that curlecue means, and just a few of them know 
the answer. That curlecue says, "indicative but not con- 
clusive." Then there is another little curlecue for the 30- 
minute interviews. This little curlecue says, "conclusive 
with a less variation than the symbol that indicates in- 
dicative." It indicates to you that the 30-minute rating is 
more conclusive than the 15. 

Now all worthwhile rating services survive, and that is 
why it is a good thing for you to know each new one as it 
comes up, particularly in the Western market where a new 
survey organization opens every time a salesman gets out 
of a job. Not many of these survive and come to New York. 
Here is a 10-second warning that applies to all buyers, 
representative salesmen and myself, and it is something 
that has brought many a timebuyer to a dead end. Don't 
let the station men or the representative men think for 
you. Get all the facts. If you are making a buy, facts are 
really important. Investigate all the ratings and when 
those ratings were made. Investigate every station. Then 
you are going to get your job out of the dangerous clerical 
sphere into which it can fall. 

I personally live in constant fear that some day the 
clerical timebuyer and the clerical salesmen are going to 
have us end up individually or collectively in a great big 
room where there is a Univac punching out the numbers 
and none of us is going to get paid. 

C. CALCULATIONS WITH RATINGS 

LARRY DECKINGER: Unfortunately most of us don't 
like to work with numbers. We are just not mathemati- 
cians. Remember the story of the Pullman porter and the 
fellow who didn't know what to tip him? He said, "George, 
what is the size of your average tip?" The porter scratched 
his head and said, "Well, Boss, the average I suppose is 
about a dollar." 

So the fellow gave him a dollar. And George scratched 
his head again and said, 'Thanks, Boss, but you know you 
is the first one that has come up to the average!" 

We just don't like to work with numbers, but we have 
to. The ratings come off the line and they are numbers, 
and we have to do something with them. Now, what should 
we do with them? 

One of the pitfalls that we should watch for is the blind 
use of ratings as something beyond the measurement of 
homes. They are percentages of homes or they are num- 
bers of homes, and that is all. 

A 10 rating in the afternoon could be quite different 
qualitatively from a 10 rating in the evening. That would 
be particularly true, say for a cigarette. If you know what 
percentage of men smoke, and you know what percentage 
of women smoke, and you know that men who smoke 
consume 50% more cigarettes than women who smoke, you 
can apply those figures. You can thus get a better index 
of the cigarette consumption by the audience to two dif- 
ferent shows. That can given you a better clue as to which 
of the two programs is the one you would buy. If you 
don't have such consumption figures for an item, at least 
you can make some broad general estimate to sharpen 
your "home-audience size data" where necessary. 

Secondly, you should know something about the brand 
strategy to make sense out of rating points. Take a 60- 
rated 8-second I.D., or take an 8-rated one-minute spot. 
Mathematically, you probably take the 60 and multiply it 
by the 8 and say that is 480 rating-second points, or you 
multiply the other 8 by the 60 and you get the same an- 
swer numerically. But certainly they are qualitatively 
different. The same type of problem surrounds three 20- 



*•» 




11 JULY 1955 



221 



yy$j£\ TIMEBUYING 



second spots. Are they equal to one one-minute spot, if 
they total the same rating and cost? Unfortunately that 
is just another of those questions that we are awful good 
at asking, but not so good at answering. 

The third calculation pitfall is this. We should be care- 
ful not to mix ratings from different cities or places, and, 
also, we shouldn't mix ratings of different types. If a sales- 
man comes in and he tells you a show has a 42 Nielsen, ask 
him to slow down a minute and tell you just what kind of 
Nielsen rating is that. There could be so many of them. 
Does it mean 42% of all television homes? Does it mean 
42 '", of those in the area served by the program? Is it the 
average audience rating or a total audience rating? Cer- 
tainly, you can't compare a 42 total audience rating on one 
show with a 35 average audience rating on another. 

One ought to be awfully careful about comparing rat- 
ings for shows of different sizes, particularly in time peri- 
od evaluations. A total audience rating gives an advantage 
to an hour show over a 15-minute show, because the show 
has a longer period in which to build up its rating. 

Next, one should watch for average tendencies as op- 
posed to peak performances. 

Be sure that some conniving soul doesn't slip over a 
share-of -audience figure to you as an audience size mea- 
surement. Shares of audience are, of course, relative mea- 
surements. They are not audience sizes. And when the 
rating gets a little low, there may be tendency to slip in 
the share of audience instead of the audience size. 

When you figure cost-per- 1,000 commercial minutes, 
maybe you do it this way. You take the rating, multiply 
by the coverage of the show. Then you multiply by the 
number of commercial minutes and finally, you divide by 
the cost. That is all right if the rating happens to be an 
average audience measurement. If it is a total audience 
measurement, unfortunately you can't do it because the 
calculation is spurious. 

In getting cost-per- 1,000-homes reached by the pro- 
gram, you can only do it properly by using some kind of 
total audience type of rating. If you use an average audi- 
ence measurement, you can get some index of homes per 
dollar, but the index has a time measurement mixed in, 
because average audience is the average audience for one 
minute. Not that that's wrong, or not usable. Simply, it's 
not a per homes per dollar figure — it's an average number 
of homes per dollar during an average instant. 

For a spot announcement, most of us average the rat- 
ing of the preceding show with that of the following show. 
Unfortunately, you can't do that with total audience mea- 
surement. You can only do that with an average audi- 
ence measurement. Total audience means people listen- 
ing at any time of the show. 

Now, the reason I point out these differences is that 
some audience size measurements are total audience fig- 
ures. Some of them are average audience ratings. Both 
have a function. 

Watch out what you do with cumulative ratings. It 
seems to be a fetish in this industry to figure what is the 
cumulative. The Life continuing study measures how 
many homes Life reaches in 13 issues which very, very few 
ever buy anyway. And for those who do, their ads don't 
get that coverage anyway. Cumulative audience has a 
place. You want to know what your reach is. If you have 
a product like Tide which is a prospect for every home, 
then you want to get your message into many homes. You 
want a big cumulative coverage. But if you have a spe- 
cialty like Lux Flakes, in perhaps a smaller percentage of 
homes, then you don't want such broad coverage. 

D. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Q. Can we have an analysis and discussion of the various 
audience measurement services with emphasis on the 
strong points and weaknesses of each? 
A. (From Larry Deckinger) Let's do it this way. Let's 
talk methodology, not services. Let's start with the meter. 
PAGE 7 The principal advantage of the meter is that it is auto- 



matic. It is an automatic measurement of something. 
Let's call it "set-tuning." Another advantage of this sys- 
tem is that it can give you both an average type measure- 
ment and a total type audience measurement. It can give 
you a measurement for every minute of a program that 
you want. 

The great disadvantage of the meter system is that it 
doesn't tell you anything about the people who are at the 
other end of the set. The set is tuned in, but you don't 
know whether it is a man, a woman, or both or neither. 

Unfortunately, one of the great disadvantages of the 
meter system is that it is costly to install and operate the 
system. The only reason we don't have meter systems so 
far for local ratings is that nobody has been able to figure 
out a way to do the job cheap enough so that most of us 
can afford to buy what they do. (Editor's note: Since this 
talk A. C. Nielsen has launched a local rating service using 
meters called Recordimeters plus diaries to get local mea- 
surements.) 

However, the Pulse people have been working on a new 
system which if it works will give us local ratings on a 
meter system. They are going to try to sell it in New York 
within the next year. I think it is remarkable that they 
are adopting a meter system. Their whole livelihood has 
been built on another kind of system, yet they are willing 
to work on and adopt this one if the industry feels strong- 
ly enough that is the system they really want. 

Another system is the telephone coincidental. The tele- 
phone coincidental has this great disadvantage — you can- 
not get out too far, you cannot make a completely national 
coincidental survey. Another disadvantage is that the tele- 
phone coincidental gets only into telephone homes, but 
telephones are gradually expanding so that this disadvan- 
tage is diminishing. 

The real advantage of the telephone coincidental is that 
you check at the moment the program is on the air. You 
ask him, "What were you listening to just now when the 
telephone rang?" And it is unlikely that he will have for- 
gotten. 

However, there may be three or four radio sets in the 
house, and you cannot very well expect the interviewee to 
rush around the household to find what everybody is doing 
with the other sets. 

Diary is a third system for recording audience-size mea- 
surements. Most of us feel that to a large extent people 
who cooperate with the diary may be kind of funny. In a 
word, they are people who are willing to do this thing. 
The diary provides a reminder to use the set because there 
is a diary on the set. Maybe kids fill in the diaries. Or do 
people over-fill diaries, getting overly enthusiastic per- 
haps? Yet the diary can cover all hours of listening, 
which no coincidental method can. 

A fourth system that is in commercial use today is the 
roster recall. Its principal advantage is its economy. You 
can cover a lot of ratings hours in one interview. You can 
cover a six-hour or longer listening span. But, like the 
others, this system has disadvantages too. For example, 
I may ring the doorbell at 6:00 p.m. tonight and ask about 
listening at two o'clock in the afternoon. Unfortunately, 
the man who was home at 2:00 may not be home at 6:00, 
so you can't ask him what he listened to. 

You show people a list of program and ask them to tell 
you what they are listening to. It is a reminder for some, 
but others might not even know the names of the pro- 
grams, particularly on small stations. All they know, for 
example, is that they were listening to the news, but they 
don't know which news program it was. 

There are problems in all systems. No system is perfect. 
All have advantages and disadvantages. The type of in- 
formation you get varies. I would say that as a source of 
information the electronic system, the recorder system, 
probably gets you more information than any other. You 
can get information minute-by-minute. You can get the 
total audience, the average audience, the cumulative audi- 
ence. You can have it accumulated over seven years if 
the tapes last that long. You can do more tricks with 
those data than you can with most of the others. 



?Y\W ***** 




WMCT 



WM 



C • WMCF • WMCT 



MEMPHIS 
CHANNEL 5 

Mem| I • T.V. Station 

100,000 WATTS 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES— THE BRANHAM CO. 
Owned and operated by THE COMMERCIAL APPEAL 
NBC 8ASIC • ALSO AFFILIATED WITH ABC AND DUMONT 



11 JULY 1955 



223 




Famous on the local scene 




The Old Man of the Mountains never fails to impress the visitor, 

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a Storer Station is a local station. 







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NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 
TOM HARKER, National Sales Director • 118 E. 57th St., New York 22, ELdorado 5-76 

BOB WOOD, Midwest National Sales Mgr. • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, FRanklin 2-64< 

GAYLE V. GRUBB, Pac. Coast Natl Sales Mgr. • 111 Sutter Bldg., San Francisco 4, Calif., WEst 1-2CK 



. 




M 



yet known throughout the nation. 












TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



The coincidental is the only way you can get average 
audience composition. The Roster Recall and the diary 
make it possible to get out-of-home information which 
you cannot get through the other systems. 

Q. Why is it sometimes said that Pulse tends to inflate 
smaller station ratings as compared to Hooper? 
A. 'From Larry Deckinger) You say "inflates." That's 
a little loaded. Pulse certainly gives a higher rating. The 
roster recall system, which Pulse uses, produces higher 
ratings for small shows, for low-rated shows relative to 
high-rated shows, than does the coincidental. For example, 
while a high-rated show might have a 20 on both systems, 
the low-rated show might have a 10 on the roster recall 
and a 5 on the coincidental. 

I don't think anyone knows exactly why that happens. 
But I think that the roster recall system gives a better 
break to the long-lasting low-rated shows. If you listened 
to 15 minutes of an hour disk jockey show, you might 
identify two, or more quarter hours as having been heard. 

But it's really a very mysterious effect, because there 
would seem to be a contrary effect, with the roster which 
really should emphasize the high-rated show. Maybe people 
would "identify" having listened to some show today, when 
actually they listened to it regularly, but just not today. 
There is that possibility. Hence, just why is the Pulse 
coincidental gap greatest for lowest-rated shows? Well, I 
guess we don't really know. 

Q. What degree of credibility do you attach to a survey 
subscribed to by only one station in a given market? What 
is the panel's opinion of station area reports, i.e., the WOR 
Nielsen or the WHDH or WIBC Pulse studies? 
A. 'From Tom Lynch) When only one station subscribes 
to an audience service in their area, there are a lot of 
other elements that come in. Did another station subscribe 
to a different one? If so, you should evaluate both services. 
If it is the only rating service in the market, then the 
station man has enough guts to at least have his station 
rated. The other fellows do not. I'd go along with him. 

LARRY DECKINGER: If you mean that there is only 
one subscriber to a given service in a given market, then 
I would say that I firmly believe this, and I hope you will 
too. The rating service people as a group have integrity. 
If they didn't, they wouldn't stay in business long. The 
one most important ingredient that any researcher has 
is his honesty, and I thing it is almost an insult to ask that 
question about a service. I hope whoever asked the question 
will reconsider on the basis that whether one station 
subscribes, or 40 stations, or no stations, that the survey 
itself is basically honest. 

When the station knows that a survey will be conducted, 
it may do some promotion, these things can happen. How 
to guard against them, I don't know, except you can do 
a little investigating. I think you will find the survey 
itself is honest. It reports what the men in the field find. 

The questioner might have meant, "What is the panel's 
opinion of station area reports, that is, the WOR Nielsen 
or WHDH or the Pulse studies?" Area studies are wonder- 
ful. They are certainly a lot better than city reports. Of 
course, there are exceptions. But you generally do not 
buy a station just to cover a small area. You are hoping 
to get whatever that station covers. The station area report 
gives you some idea of what that coverage is. 

However, I don't know whether the asker of the question 
meant "Is the sample big enough?" Is that what he means, 
or did he mean "What does one think of an area report as 
against a city report?" I answered the latter. 

Q. How do you find out how many homes are reached? 
A. (From Tom Lynch) Applying the percentage to the 
total audience is dependent upon what rating service it is. 
Does the service cover a city only or an area sample as the 
Nielsen studies do? Some of these ratings cannot be pro- 
jected. However, we have to project some in order to get 
a basis of statistics for comparison with other media. The 
base is the important thing. Apply percentage against 
PAGE 8 any base. • • • 



Semhiar 



3. 




W*> "*•■ 



GUIDES TO MORE EFFECTIVE TIMEBUYING 

Speakers: Frank Minehan, vice president for media, SSCB; 
Robert E. Dunville, president, Crosley Broadcasting Corp. 
Moderator was Mary McKenna, director of research and 
sales development, WNEW, and a timebuying veteran. 

A MEDIA DIRECTOR LOOKS AT TIMEBUYING 



FRANK MINEHAN: I want to help, if 
I possibly can. contribute to a better 
understanding of the aims of time- 
buying and its part in developing mar- 
keting and media plans. 
[\/ ^^± Media, as you know, is a means 
"*1^^B through which an advertising or sales 

^A ^k idea can be demonstrated or conveyed 

JHbJI t0 tne Public. In many respects, the 

different media represent diverse ways 
of reaching the over-all public or some selected part of it. 
Of course, your immediate job is to buy time. But the 
only reason for your existence as a timebuyer is to sell 
your client's merchandise, not to be a specifically wonder- 
ful timebuyer. You might think you are a good timebuyer, 
but if you are not contributing to the sales of the product 
that you are supposed to sell, you are wasting time and 
money. 

Programs, adjacencies, time periods, ratings, audience 
composition and costs must be coordinated to fit the sales 
pattern of the product you are trying to sell. Media can- 
not be selected until the advertising problem is completely 
outlined. 

Before you can even start to sell anything you must first 
outline the product's marketing and advertising problem. 
These are the questions you should ask yourself: 

1. What are we selling? — the product, its merits, values. 

2. To whom are we selling? — what kind of people, sex„ 
age, income, etc. 

3. Where are we selling? — geographically, city size, type 
of outlets utilized. 

4. How are we selling? — how the merits or values of the 
products are to be demonstrated to the public (length of 
commercials, type of commercials). 

5. When are we selling? — seasonal aspects of sales and 
consumption. 

After learning the answers to these questions you should 
select the best media to help increase the product sales. 

There are at leait 10 primary types of media and there 
is no single yardstick or footrule which can measure their 
advantages and disadvantages. We must select the me- 
dium or media which comes closest to fulfilling the re- 
quirements of the budget, market, copy and advertising 
effectiveness for the product under consideration. 

To help us do this job intelligently, media research has 
provided us with a wealth of media and market informa- 
tion. Circulation, ratings, audience composition by times 
of day and day of week, areas of circulation, ARB, BMB, 
Hooper, Pulse. Trendex, Nielsen and so forth. 

The extensive data sources we have can all be used in 
one way or another to help us do a better job. For ex- 
ample, we can check to see how sales for types of products 
are concentrated in various portions of the country. Take 
the 168 metropolitan areas. They contain 60% of the 
families in the United States. But these families account 
for a varying percentage of retail sales, ranging from a 
high of 78% of apparel store sales to a low of hardware 
store sales of 42%. 

You can check to determine how media circulation re- 
lates to total population. The coverage of radio is about 
95% in both metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas, and 
television is 75% in the metropolitan areas and about 45% 
in the balance of the United States. 







it tak 
to 



KPTVs Television Giant 

r the Portland, Oregon 
ne! 




STORER NATIONAL 
SALES HEADQUARTERS 



TOM HARKER. V. P., National Sales Director, 118 E. 57th Street, New York. Eldorado 5-7690 
GAYLE V. GRUBB, V. P.. West Coast Sales Manager. 1 1 1 Sutter St.. San Francisco. SUtter 1-3631 
BOB WOOD. Midwest National Sales Manager. 230 N Michigan Ave.. Chicago. FRanklm 2 6498 



Represented 

Nationally by 

NBC Spot Sales 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



We have products using magazines and radio, and we 
have combinations of newspapers, Sunday supplements, 
magazines, network radio, network spots and network 
television with a spattering here and there of tv spot. 

My main purpose for mentioning this is to leave with 
you, if I can, this thought: There is no specific set formula 
for developing a media plan. You must go back orig- 
inally to the basic questions: what are we selling?; to 
whom are we selling?; where are we selling?. Then deter- 
mine what your budget is, find out what the copy is going 
to be. Tie the whole thing into your plan and come out 
with a combination of media or a single medium. 

Now, it is important for you to remember that as the 
complexities of this business increased, there was a corre- 
sponding demand for imagination, increased skills in 
analysis, interpretation and the presentation of your ideas 
on media and markets. 

All media directors and tuyers have to continue to be 
alert as to the development of all media. You as buyers 
must know the advantages and disadvantages of televi- 
sion and radio when compared to other media. You can't 
bury your head in the sand. They exist. You can do a more 
intelligent job if you can point out why your medium is 
best. 

I would like to mention that a research source not 
mentioned in this talk is the salesman who calls on you. 
If he does a good job in supplying you with competent and 
up-to-date information and you continue to use it wisely 
with the research at hand, you can't help but do a good job. 



WHAT QUALITATIVE RESEARCH DOES 




ROBERT E. DUNVILLE: I would like 
to touch upon the significant difference 
between quantitative and qualitative re- 
search. Any of the audience research 
studies such as Nielsen, ARB, Pulse, 
Hooper, etc. will obviously help deter- 
mine the size of an audience or the 
quantity of that audience. Now, some of 
the research companies, in addition to 
civing information as to quantity on a 
single program, will give information on certain qualitative 
factors such as the number of people looking, or listening, 
broken down as to male or female and age groups. To my 
knowledge this is about as far as any of the five or six 
major audience research companies go into "qualitative 
research." 

Qualitative reseerch is in itself as complex as the 
circuitry of a radio or television receiver. A few of the 
factors encompassed in qualitative research: (1) age, (2) 
sex, <3) education, (4> family size. <5> income, <6) city 
size. 

You might assume that an experienced buyer can deter- 
mine the age group to which a radio or television pro- 
grom is directed and simultaneously determine the general 
appeal, male or female. This is extremely dangerous. 

A good example of this would te the matter of wrestling 
on television. I think it was generally contended that 
wrestling appeals to men from 30 to 45. or maybe 50 years 
of age. An analysis of wrestling in the Midwest has indi- 
cated however, that 47% of the wrestling television audi- 
ences were composed of women and of the 47%, over 
60% were 40 years old. or older. Prize fights, that is the 
pro fights, however, appeal, according to our figures, to 
97% men, slightly less than 3% women and the age group 
is from 20 to 45 predominantely, with a small percent 
being 45 or older. I mention these two program types 
because they are both exhibition of personal contests and. 
still, the make-up of the audience is entirely different. 
Only through qualitative research can these determina- 
tions be made with any degrse of accuracy. iFor article 
PAGE 9 containing data en audience programing preference based 



on age, sex, education and income, see "Does your show 
reach people — or customers?" sponsor 18 October 1954, 
page 38.) 

As regards rural vs. urban — you probably know in the 
Midwest so-called hillbilly programs are extremely popular. 
The quantitative research companies mentioned before 
will, I am sure, substantiate the popularity of hillbilly pro- 
grams throughout the entire Midwest part of the country. 
They have even proved to be popular, both radio and tele- 
vision, on a network basis. However, in over 25 years of 
selling hillbilly programs, I have constantly heard the 
statement from well informed timebuyers that the client 
would not be interested as his particular product is not 
one that is generally purchased in rural communities. 
Authoritative analyses of hillbilly programs reveal, how- 
ever, that there is no significant difference in the degree 
of listening or viewing in the urban areas, small towns, 
villages or farms. As a matter of fact there is a slight 
edge on the listening in the urban centers. 

As to income groups, while the hillbilly program is 
listened to more in the upper-lower income group and the 
upper-middle income group — really the heart of the buying 
power — they are not listened to or watched to a great 
degree in the upper income group, however, though strange 
as it may seem, hillbilly programs have a higher index in 
the upper income group than do symphonies, operas, or 
what is generally classed as good music. 

At WLW we have for over 12 years conducted a regular, 
week to week, running account of nearly every form of 
qualitative research. While there are several methods that 
might be employed, they are generally the personal-inter- 
view type where there is a door-to-door interviewer asking 
a number of questions that have been prepared by the 
research firm or the research director of the agency. There 
is the other method using a "captured panel" in which a 
recording of a program, or a film of a television program, 
is presented to the panel and after listening or watching 
they fill out a questionnaire or in some cases a mechanical 
device is used to voice approval or disapproval. A method 
we use is a stratified panel in which questionnaires are sent 
on a regular weekly basis, and in which the members of 
the panel receive remuneration in the form of points 
that may be applied to a great variety of useful items 
ranging anywhere from umbrellas to complete living room 
suites, bedroom furniture and all sorts of appliances, etc. 
In our opinion this method is by far the best, though 
extremely expensive. The success or failure of this method 
depends entirely upon < 1 > the size of the panel and < 2 ) the 
degree of perfection of stratification. Bear in mind a!so 
that there are always members of the panel who eventually 
lose interest or move from the area or, because of illness, 
deaths, births, graduation, etc.. cause changes in the 
stratification. Then too, people have a way of getting 
older each day and this too has an effect on the stratifica- 
tion. A good part of the expense is the continual replace- 
ment of members in order to keep this stratification as 
nearly perfect as humanly possible. Peoples Advisory 
Council, is the name of the panel (and none of the mem- 
bers of the panel has any knowledge whatsoever that 
Crosley Broadcasting Corp. is conducting the studies as 
this may lead to bias). It operates from a Dayton address 
and all questionnaires are prepared and signed by Dr. 
Richard Hepner. Syracuse University, Syracuse. New York. 
The questionnaires are tabulated by IBM, reducing as 
far as possible the human error. The questions asked 
range from "What is the most desirable length of a news 
program?" to questions relative to types of commercials, 
acceptance or rejection. There is one annual study con- 
ducted on "buying intent." In other words, what do these 
people intend to buy. Many studies are made each year 
on what has been purchased and the reason for so doing. 
These purchases are broken down into categories such as 
dentifrices, coffee, soap, both hand and package variety. 
This qualitative research is conducted with a two-fold 
purpose. The most important is to inform our manage- 
ment as to the proper program procedure: the other, also 



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WJBK-TV GOES FAR AND WIDE 
TO MAKE SALES FOR YOU 
THROUGHOUT THE HUGE DETROIT- 
SOUTHERN MICHIGAN MARKET 

Area Survey Figures Show 
WJBK-TV Tops 'em All! 

Look at these typical ARB figures for March, 1955, for example: 

IN FLINT, 58 miles from downtown Detroit: 

47% tune most to WJBK-TV before 6:00 P.M. 

14% to 2nd Detroit station,- 3% to 3rd Detroit station 

48% tune most to WJBK-TV after 6:00 P.M. 

14% to 2nd Detroit station; 3% to 3rd Detroit station 

IN ANN ARBOR, 40 miles from downtown Detroit: 

26% tune most to WJBK-TV before 6:00 P.M. 

18% to 2nd Detroit station; 13% to 3rd Detroit station 

43% tune most to WJBK-TV after 6:00 P.M. 

25% to 2nd Detroit station; 8% to 3rd Detroit station 





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There's a lot more to the "Detroit Television Market" than just 
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station that's most welcome in those homes, as well as in 
Detroit . . . WJBK-TV. 

Success story after success story in our files show the far-reaching 
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I 



CHANNEL 



DETROIT 



p 


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"T 


fcr fNF KAtl ACtMCr 

National Safes Director. 
TOM MARKER 
1 1t E. 57th. Now York 22 
ELDORADO 5-7690 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



important, is to aid and assist our clients in making the 
proper purchase. 

From these studies it will become evident over a period 
of time that the program with the highest audience rating 
does not necessarily do the best advertising job for any 
given product. Conversely, it does not necessarily follow 
because an audience rating is low and loyal that it will 
successfully sell any product. Many agencies and adver- 
tisers are beginning to put more faith in qualitative re- 
search than in quantitative research. I could give you 
several examples of extremely low-rated programs adver- 
tising a given product or products, that do a far better 
job than programs on our same stations having two to 
three times the audience. Because of the lethargy that 
has existed for a good number of years in the matter of 
buying time, it is extremely difficult for our sales depart- 
ment to convince the timebuyer or client that he is 
making a better buy on a lower-rated program than a 
higher-rated program. However, I am sure each of you 
has in your career experienced this and, unless your 
agency has a continuing method of "opportunity pattern 
type" of qualitative research, the answer to why this 
occurs will be extremely difficult, if not impossible to 
determine. On the other hand with proper use, and I 
want to stress the word "proper" use of qualitative re- 
search, you will have placed in your hands what I consider 
the most valuable tool that could be used by you as a 
timebuyer. May I implore you, if you do not have avail- 
able to you qualitative research material, that you obtain 
and analyze that material that is made available to you 
through radio and television stations and other sources? 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Q. In buying tv or radio spot time, what weight do you 
give to station merchandising and promotion services? 
May they overshadow a poor rating picture? 
A. (From Frank Minehan) As far as our agency is con- 
cerned, merchandising comes into the picture only when 
all other factors are even. If, when you are buying a spot, 
the cost-per- 1,000 of one station vs. another is about even, 
if the audience you are trying to reach is about even, if 
everything else is even and one offers merchandising, the 
station with the merchandising is likely to get the 
business. There must be some little advantage for one 
station or the other, and whichever has the advantage we 
buy from the straight consumer's point of view. 

MARY McKENNA: Since the Crosley Broadcasting Corp. 
has one of the most well-known merchandising services in 
the country, I think Mr. Dunville wants to comment. 
BOB DUNVILLE: I want to make this one observation. 
I think that the term "merchandising" is oftentimes 
loosely used. There is a difference between merchandising 
and impressing the client with how a program has been 
merchandised. All products advertised do not necessarily 
lend themselves to good, sound merchandising, and I think 
any good, sound merchandising organization recognizes 
this and will not attempt to use it as a means of trying to 
cover up a low rating. As far as we are concerned, the 
rating has absolutely nothing to do with the merchandising 
efforts put behind it; it is the product, its distribution, and 
the merchandisability of the product. 

Q. Should radio and television timebuyers be more 
militant in agency-client conferences to get a larger share 
of the appropriation, because of radio's greater economy 
and effectiveness? 

A. <From Frank Minehan) Granted that everything you 
say is true, I think that your militancy depends upon your 
client and your account executive, and your ability to be 
militant and get away with it. I am not trying to dodge 
the question. You all realize that circumstances alter your 
conduct in a meeting. If you are strong enough and a 
good enough salesman and have enough influence with 
PAGE 10 a client, certainly you can afford then to be militant. 



Seminar 



4. 



HOW TO ENGINEER A GOOD BUY 

Speakers: Earl M. Johnson, vice president in charge sta- 
tion relations, MBS; Robert L. Coe, director of station 
relations, Du Mont. Moderator was Frank E. Pellegrin, 
vice president, H-R Representatives and H-R Tv. 

RADIO STATION COVERAGE 



0EARL M. JOHNSON: It is impossible in 
this brief rundown to more than scratch 
the surface on the subject of radio sta- 
tion coverage. 
Basically, the reception of a radio 
signal depends on only two factors: 
1. The strength of the signal, and 
2. The interference present. 
The strength of the signal in turn 
depends upon power, frequency, ground 
conductivity and the type of antenna. To discuss these 
items briefly: 

Power of a radio station varies from 100 watts to 50,000 
watts. 

Frequency ranges in steps of 10 kilocycles, from 540 
kilocycles to 1600 kilocycles, thus creating 107 broadcast 
channels. 

Ground conductivity, which is the ability of the earth 
to conduct radio waves, and is measured in specific elec- 
trical units, varies from a low of v 2 for the sandy soil of 
Long Island, to 40 for the plains of the Dakotas, and to 
5,000 for sea water! 

Antenna can be either non-directional, radiating the 
same amount of power in all directions, or it can be di- 
rectional, expanding the radiated power in certain di- 
rections and suppressing it in others. Stations using di- 
rectional antennas are usually required to do so in order 
to minimize interference to other stations. The use of 
directional antennas enables a great many stations to 
operate on the same frequency without causing excesssive 
interference to one another. Also, a station will sometimes 
use a directional antenna to provide a greater signal to 
the more populous areas of a community. 

With all other factors equal, the greater the amount 
of power, the greater is the resulting coverage area. How- 
ever, these other factors can be of more importance than 
power in determining coverage area. For example, a 250- 
watt station in one city may have the same size coverage 
area as a 50, 000- watt station in another city because of 
superior ground conductivity. 

The 0.5 millivolt per meter contour is often used as the 
"boundary line" of a station's coverage. It has a special 
significance in the assignment of frequencies by the FCC 
and is often considered to be a fairly good signal. Actually, 
to determine whether or not a 0.5 mv/m signal is a listen- 
able one, we must consider the second factor mentioned 
at the beginning of this talk, namely the interference 
present at the point of reception. 

There are three general types of interference: 

1. Atmospheric noise, due principally to thunderstorms. 

2. Man-made noise, due to automotive ignition, electric 
motors and switches, neon signs. 

3. Interference from other radio stations operating on 
the same or adjacent frequencies. 

To determine whether a listenable signal is available 
in a specific location, the two factors of signal and noise 
must be considered together. For example, a relatively 
strong signal might be useless if the noise or interference 
present were excessive, whereas a relatively weak signal 
might be perfectly satisfactory, if there were but little 
noise present. 

These interference factors are not constant, but vary 
greatly, and their analysis is quite involved. At Mutual, 



ATLANTA POPULATION 808,853 
RETAIL SALES $888,692,000 

WAGA-TV REACHES AN ADDITIONAL 1,986,900 
WITH RETAIL SALES OF $1,202,594,000 




THIS IS WAGA-LAND 
WAGA-TV's 1100-foot tower 2049 feet above sea 
level covers in its O.l milivolt contour 81 counties 
in Georgia and 1 1 in Alabama. Mail count adds 
additional counties in Tennessee, the Carolinas, 
and Georgia. The grade "A" curve is 39 miles; 
grade "B", 71 miles and the 0.1 milivolt contour 
extends a full 80 miles. 



Atlanta's standard metropolitan area population 
has jumped 20% in the past five years. It now ranks 
as the 21st market in the nation. But to this market. 
WAGA-TV adds nearly two million more people 
and more than a billion dollars in retail sales. Here- 
are market data of the area covered by WAG A- 1 V 
based on its 0.1 milivolt contour: 

Population 2,795,753 

Disposable Income. . .53,314,323.000 
Retail Sales 52,091,286,000 

Pulse shows 86.1% television ownership in Metro- 
politan Atlanta. In the area beyond, its a rare sight 
to find a home without TV. 

Only WAGA-TV, with its new 1 100-foot tower. 
2049 feet above sea level, and its full 100.000 watts 
on Channel 5 — plus CBS-TV and outstanding local 
shows — can cover this market completely. 

Get the facts on Waga-land from your repre- 
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waga-tv 



CBS-TV in 



Represented Nationally by the 

KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 

STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY SALES OFFICES: 

New York — 118 E. 57th St. 

Chicago — 230 N. Michigan Ave. 

San Francisco — HI Sutter St. Tom Harker, Natl Sales Director; Bob Wood, Natl Soles Manager 




11 JULY 1955 



231 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



we have developed a set of engineering standards that 
take into account all the factors we have mentioned. We 
call it "listenability." Time does not permit a discussion 
of these standards now, but an example might be helpful. 
It can be determined that for a specific station in Florida, 
a signal of 2.0 millivolts per meter is required to consti- 
tute what is called Grade 1, or Primary Service, whereas 
another specific station, located on the West Coast, is 
capable of providing this same quality service with a sig- 
nal of only .1 millivolt per meter, or one-twentieth of the 
signal strength. This is due to lower noise or static level 
on the West Coast as compared to parts of Florida. 

All the preceding discussion pertains to the so-called 
ground wave emission of a broadcast transmitter. This 
transmitted ground wave provides the basic coverage for 
all stations both during the daytime and nighttime. Dur- 
ing the nighttime hours, however, there is an additional 
transmission known as "skywave." As the sun sets, a layer 
of ionized particles, known as the ionosphere, is formed 
about 70 miles above the earth. This layer acts as a re- 
flector and during the hours of darkness bounces radio 
signals back to earth at very great distances from their 
transmitters, and with relatively little loss of signal in- 
tensity. 

For all but a small percentage of the standard broad- 
cast stations, this phenomena has a detrimental effect on 
their nighttime coverage area. Most of the 2,600-plus ra- 
dio broadcast stations share their operating frequency, 
so that on one given frequency there may be as many as 
several hundred stations throughout the country. Conse- 
quently, with the ionosphere reflecting these signals back 
to earth, the resulting interference on that particular fre- 
quency is severe. For this reason, the nighttime coverage 
of many stations extends only slightly beyond their prin- 
cipal cities. 

For the small number of stations we mentioned before, 
namely the "clear-channel" stations, the skywave effect 
is a very desirable one. A clear-channel station is one 
which operates on a frequency that is not assigned to any 
other U.S. station, or that is assigned to only a very few 
other stations. In such a case there is little or no inter- 
ference from other stations to the skywave signals, and 
consequently they are capable of affording satisfactory re- 
ception. It should be pointed out, however, that skywave 
service is not as satisfactory as groundwave service. The 
ionosphere does not remain at a fixed elevation above the 
earth, but actually varies considerably. This causes the 
reflected signals to vary in intensity; the condition re- 
ferred to as "fading." In spite of this fact, however, sky- 
wave signals furnish the only available nighttime recep- 
tion to millions of rural listeners, who live beyond the 
range of ground waves. 

Now, let me summarize very quickly some of the points 
I have discussed. In general, it can be stated that greater 
coverage will result from: 

1. Stations with higher power. 

2. Stations operating on the lower frequencies. 

3. Stations located in areas having high conductivity. 

4. Stations operating with non-directional-antennas. 

5. Stations operating in areas where noise factor is low. 

TELEVISION STATION COVERAGE 

ROBERT L. COE: Admittedly television 
is highly technical, but I think just as 
true is the fact that the technical fa- 
cilities of the stations and how they are 
operated play a tremendous part in the 
job that that station will do for your 
client. So I think it is essential that all 
of you who are engaged in buying time 
have some understanding of some of 
the principal factors involved, because 
you certainly are barraged with all kinds of charts, maps, 
diagrams, and everything else, attesting that this station 
PAGE 11 is the best station in the country. And considering the 




factors which probably would be of most interest and 
importance to you, the three that come to my mind first 
are frequency, power, and antenna height. Those are the 
three major factors, which, everything else being equal, 
will determine the coverage of the specific station. 

With respect to frequency, I think there are two terms 
probably all of you are familiar with by now, vhf and uhf. 
Actually, there are three bands in this television spectrum 
of ours. The band from Channel 2 to Channel 6, which 
is sometimes referred to as the low-band of vhf, the high- 
band of vhf, which is Channel 7 to Channel 13, and uhf, 
Channels 14 to 83. 

When the first postwar stations came on the air right 
after World War II, they were all on the low band, Chan- 
nels 2 to 6. Why? Well, simply because it was much 
easier then to build equipment for those channels and 
besides, as some of you will remember, no one was break- 
ing down any doors to get television channels. I think, in- 
cidentally, some of us are prone to forget the skepticism 
which greeted many of us when we talked about starting 
television stations back in those early days. 

Then in 1948 in some of the major cities at least, all 
those low-band channels, 2 to 6, were exhausted. So sta- 
tions started opening up on the high bands, Channels 7 
to 13. Some of us, and I am one, well remember the prob- 
lems of those high-band stations when they first opened 
up. The receiving antennas were not installed for high- 
band operation. In many cases they weren't designed for 
proper operation. Many receivers had never been adjusted 
for Channels 7 to 13, and it soon became evident that 
you needed more power and more signals to produce the 
same picture on the higher channels. 

Now we have uhf, and the memories of that — they are 
really not memories at all, they are experiences on uhf — 
are still very fresh. Certainly at the outset uhf has had 
all the problems that we had on Channels 7 to 13, and a 
lot more thrown in — and not all technical by any means. 

In the matter of power, television stations, as most of 
you know, are generally referred to as so many kilowatts 
E.R.P. I have long suspected that maybe E.R.P. threw 
a lot of people for a loss. It stands for effective radiated 
power, and it is something slightly new to most of us 
who have had a lot of radio experience. 

In radio if a man had a 50-kilowatt transmitter, he had 
a 50-kilowatt station. In tv we can't make things that 
simple. It has to be a little more mysterious, and perhaps 
I can explain to you in layman's language just what ef- 
fective radiated power is and how we arrive at it. 

The simplest components of any television station, as 
you know, include a transmitter, a tower, and on top of it 
some kind of an antenna. Assume, for instance, that we 
had a 25-kilowatt transmitter — and let me point out right 
there that 25 kilowatts can be referred to as 25,000 watts. 
(I think most stations prefer the latter designation, be- 
cause it sounds like an awful lot more.) 

Assume the simplest form of antenna on top of this 
tower of ours and that the necessary transmission line 
connects the transmitter to the antenna, and we will dis- 
regard the factor of power losses in that line. 

If you were at some distance from the antenna and 
looking crosswise at it and could see the television waves 
emanating from the antenna, you might conceivably be 
radiating equal power in all directions in a vertical plane. 
Now, just as gradually in radio we have come to use more 
and more directional antennas, it is possible in television 
to directionalize to a certain extent and change the pat- 
tern so that energy that is going clear up in the sky, for 
instance, and is completely wasted can be to a certain 
extent saved. 

In other words, with this new antenna, a more compli- 
cated one to be sure, more signal is being concentrated 
out toward the horizon where the people want to watch 
it. The effective radiated power, is the result of the con- 
centration of the signal by a directional antenna. It actu- 
ally gives you a gain in power, a multiplication of power 
of an amount varying anywhere from four to 20 to 40 
times the power from a simple antenna. 



TO THE LIVES OF 



m 



DETROIT'S MILLIONS 



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At work, at play ... in their homes, in their cars . . . WJBK Radio 
is the constant companion, the entertaining friend, the handy, ever-reliable 

source of news, weather, sports and music for the millions of folks in the 
Dynamic Detroit area. What better spot for your sales message than the station 
with the consistent high tune-in, night and day, every day . . . 



WJBK Radio 



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E T 



O I T 



,-*■■"' . »*'. 



mil 



MA •»« 


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_jAJ7 Represented Nationally 
y by THE KATZ AGINCY 
lalional Sales Director, TOM HARKER, 
118 E. 57th, New York 22, 
ELDORADO 5-7690 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



So assuming that with a directional antenna we have 
a gain or power multiplication of four in useful directions, 
there is four times as much power being radiated as would 
be normal with a simple antenna. Then the effective radi- 
ated power, the power that is effectively being pointed 
toward the home is four times the power being fed in the 
antenna. In this case your effective radiated power would 
be 100,000 watts since the transmitter power is 25,000 watts. 

It is probably obvious to you that on the higher fre- 
quency more power is needed to produce a given picture 
on a receiver at a given location. Partially recognizing 
this, FCC has set a limit on the power of Channels 2 to 6 
of 100 kilowatts, on Channels 7 to 13 of 316 kilowatts, and 
on all the uhf channels a maximum power of 1,000 kilo- 
watts. Today vhf transmitting equipment is capable of 
developing these maximum powers and there are a number 
of stations already operating with such powers. 

In the case of uhf we don't know too much about build- 
ing equipment; we haven't had as much experience, and 
the problems are considerable. I believe, however, there 
are a few uhf stations about to come on the air with 
maximum effective radiated power. 

The matter of antenna height, I think, is probably the 
one facet of this business that really doesn't need much 
explanation. I suspect you all visualize that pretty easily, 
because it is so closely akin to line of sight. Obviously, 
when you are up on the Empire State Building, you can 
see a lot farther. You can see over intervening obstacles. 
At a lower floor, you can't see as far. Your view may be 
blocked by some adjacent building. By the same token, a 
television station with a low antenna may well have build- 
ings somewhere in the vicinity or at a considerable dis- 
tance that will block off reception, or there may be a 
range of hills. So that the higher the antenna, the greater 
the coverage. 

Then there's the matter of shadows and nulls. Shadows 
explain themselves. They are occasioned by some obstacle 
interjecting itself between the television transmitting an- 
tenna and the receiver. All stations, I think without excep- 
tion, have some bad spots, shadows. With the increased 
power that our stations are using today, and even more 
important the increased height they are using, those areas 
are disappearing very fast. 

The matter of nulls is something else again. There are 
stations that have found that they do not actually radiate 
signals equally in all directions. Some misadjustment of 
the antenna, or some other factor, may produce a some- 
what crazy pattern. The coverage is by no means circular. 
That can sometimes be corrected by a readjustment of the 
antenna, and in some cases I know of, actually, the an- 
tenna itself has been turned around so that its bad side, 
so to speak, is pointed where there are the fewest people. 

One of the first, if not the first piece of promotion that 
any station produces and puts on your desk, is a coverage 
map. You must have seen hundreds of them by now and 
certainly some of them can be pretty confusing because 
in many cases each station owner has a different idea of 
what constitutes coverage. Some maps, for example, will 
have two perfect circles on them, one indicating Grade 
A coverage, one indicating Grade B coverage. Others will 
have a third circle farther out labeled 100 microvolts. Still 
others will just have a plain circle on the map with no 
identification of what it is. All of those, I submit, repre- 
sent a sincere effort on the part of the station to tell you 
something about coverage, but certainly there is a need 
for more standardization in our presentation of coverages. 

But remember this, Grade A and Grade B stem from 
classifications of service areas established by the FCC, 
Grade A being an area within which in about 70% of the 
possible locations within that area and with your normal 
receiver (that is roof-top antennas, no towers) the tele- 
vision viewer will get a reasonably perfect picture with no 
snow. Grade B, on the other hand, goes out considerably 
farther; it embraces that area in which 50% of the possi- 
ble locations can receive an acceptable picture with no 
PAGE 12 appreciable amount of snow. 



Within the 100 microvolts circle of a vhf station with the 
present-day receiver (assuming no interference from other 
stations) there's a picture that is certainly acceptable; par- 
ticularly so when there isn't anything else available. This 
matter of interference is something that I wanted to touch 
briefly, because I feel that that is a factor that you people 
will have to be considering more and more with the de- 
velopment of increasing numbers of stations. 

Obviously, in the early days with one station operating 
in a tremendous area with no other stations around it, 
people 100, 150 miles away and farther, enjoyed reception 
from that station. There wasn't anything else. Probably 
most of them never saw any other television signal. So 
that if they got anything that was recognizable, that 
constituted a television picture. Since the lifting of the 
freeze, there are more and more vhf stations coming on 
the air, and actually they are not required to be separated 
— and I am speaking of stations operating on the same 
channel — by any more than 175 to 200 miles. Obviously, 
if Station A has been reaching out 150 miles and 200 miles 
away Station B starts up on the same channel with a 
service area of 100 miles or so, there is going to be a large 
area between where there is going to be terrific inter- 
ference and, generally speaking, a non-usable signal. 

When new stations come on the air, the first coverage 
maps they generally show you are a perfect circle because 
they are usually based on the predictions of their engi- 
neers as to what the coverage will be. After they have 
been on the air a while they have the opportunity of mak- 
ing actual measurements and you will frequently find the 
results considerably different from the predicted coverage. 
Measurements will show, in many cases, greater coverage 
in some directions, but in others there will be less. 

No coverage map that I have seen to date has taken 
into consideration the matter of interference. There is 
one other factor of interference that I might just touch 
on, and that is what is known as adjacent-channel inter- 
ference. For example, a station operating on Channel 8 
has stations nearby operating on Channels 7 and 9. There 
is an area where that interference will be something of 
a problem. But my impression is that the modern re- 
ceivers have reduced that to the point where it is not as 
substantial a problem as the co-channel interference from 
other stations on the same channel. 

You radio people certainly know what has happened to 
radio over the years with more and more stations coming 
on. Their coverage has been reduced. Inevitably that 
same thing must happen with many television stations of 
today, as additional stations start using the same channel. 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 



Q. Does the FCC make available coverage maps of radio 
and television stations to agencies and representatives? 
A. (From Earl Johnson) You can write to the Broadcast 
License Bureau of the FCC. They have a photostating ser- 
vice which charges a small fee. You have to be pretty 
specific about the particular map you want. You have to 
ask for a particular kind of coverage, a Grade A map or 
a Grade B map, daytime map or nighttime, but you can 
get a map for any station you wish. 



Q. Where can you get a schedule of areas classified ac- 
cording to conductivity? 

A. (From Earl Johnson) There is a conductivity map 
put out by the FCC as well. It is in the FCC rules and 
standards. This little packet encompasses some 150 or 200 
pages. One of the pages has a soil-conductivity map. 



Q. Does the sky-wave factor enter into television recep- 
tion as it does in radio? 



in ALBUQUERQUE, NEW' MEXICO it s 





/ REPRESENTED 

NATIONALLY BY 

George P. Hollingbery 



ALBUQUERQUE 



GLYWIGGLY 

\ PRESENT %// 



World premier 




thorsdat 
IUU7 



L 7.30 .%» ^^ 

L 0* G * C * 



CAOWi 



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**«>« 



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s^^^^^scs 




DUMONT 

TELEVISION NETWORn 



c=J| 



m\ TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 






A. 'From Robert Coe) Not to the same extent by any 
means. There is a skywave factor and as you know peri- 
odically and without much explanation station A will 
be received 1,000 miles away. But this is not taken into 
consideration in the allocation of stations or in their 
normal estimated coverage. 

Q, What effect does receiver sensitivity have on tv signal 
strength as far as a good picture is concerned? 
A. Receiver sensitivity obviously is an important factor, 
and modern receivers by and large represent a consider- 
able improvement over the receivers we originally had. 

Q. How much difference is there in coverage between vhf 
and uhf? 

A. 'From Robert Coe) At the present time and with the 
equipment available, it is my impression and opinion that 
quite easily a vhf station utilizing the maximum power 
can obtain a considerably larger service area than an 
existing uhf station. On that subject, let me hark back 
to the preceding one on receivers, too, because uhf ad- 
mittedly has something of a problem with receivers too. 
Their sensitivity is such that they require considerably 
more of a signal on the uhf band than does the receiver 
on the vhf band. 

Q. The FCC has authorized three levels of power for the 
three frequency bands. Would the effect of that be to 
equalize the physical coverage of the three types of station? 
A. 'From Robert Coe) That, I am sure, was the inten- 
tion. That was adopted several years ago. I think some- 
thing more than that is needed, but one important factor 
now is that you can't get one million watts on uhf to at- 
tempt to equalize the coverage with your vhf competitor. 
I think there are a few stations that are about ready to 
break with it, but that will be somewhat experimental. 

Q. Wouldn't it be true that power alone would not be 
the answer, because antenna height would have a lot to 
do with it? 

A. 'From Robert Coe) Certainly power is not the factor. 
We can't take anything for granted and go by a set of 
generalizations; we have to judge each station examining 
all specific factors involved. 



Seminar 



5. 



PAGE IS 



KNOW YOUR MARKETS 

Speakers: George J. Ab'rams, vice -president. Block Drin 
Co.; J. A. Ward, President, J. A. Ward, Inc. Moderator 
was Vera Brennan, head buyer, Scheideler, Beck and 
Werner, New York, an RTES seminar committee member. 

HOW MARKET POTENTIAL VARI1 



GEORGE J. ABRAMS: A speaker who 
wanted to get this subject over with 
quickly would just dismiss it by saying 
"Markets are people" and sit down. 
He'd feel on pretty safe ground, too, 
knowing that others before him had 
echoed this sentiment and, after all. 
who can argue with the basic fact that 
without people you obviously don't have 
' market? 

But knowing your market is a different matter. Now it's 
juct net a matter of saying this is a market and it contains 
people, but of digging qualitatively into the market and 
determining whether it is a good market. 

For people, alone, don't make a market a good market. 
It takes other considerations such as race, color, religion, 
inco.r.e, seasonal factors and psychological factors, mar- 




riages, births and deaths and age. And it depends upon 
what you're selling. 

And I think in those last few words are the key to really 
knowing your market. It depends on what you sell. 

Let's consider the elements you need to know if you 
really want to know your market. 

Ask yourself, first, do we have distribution in the market 
or markets under consideration. Does this sound funda- 
mental? Actually, if you check you'll find there are many 
advertisers on networks — or in Life — who haven't gotten 
national distribution. There are many who have been mis- 
led, in effect, in their marketing thinking by becoming a 
national advertiser overnight, and yet do not actually have 
the goods in the store when the customer goes in for it as 
a result of the advertising. 

But let's assume you do have the distribution. How- 
ever, your resources are limited. You can't go into every 
market you'd like. So your problem is to pick and choose 
those offering the likelihood of a satisfactory pay-out. 

These, then, are the considerations you must weigh. 

Buying power. What do the people in this market spend? 
And more importantly from your standpoint, what do they 
spend for your type of product? The U. S. Census of Busi- 
ness will give you this data, but let me show you how it 
varies from market to market for a variety of products. 

In the city of Norfolk, Va., sales per thousand families 
for handbags were $6,000 a year as compared to $15,000 a 
year in Dallas; hard surface floor coverings, $4,000 a year 
in Washington, D. C, compared with $16,000 in Salt Lake 
City; lingerie, $18,000 in Spokane compared with $44,000 
in Memphis. The gals in Spokane are mighty warm indi- 
viduals. 

But. now suppose you were advertising these items? 
Wouldn't you be smarter to select a market where you 
knew folks were already buying them on a four to one 
ratio over other cities? Of course you would! Well, the 
same thing applies to soda pop and baking soda. There 
are buying differences market by market, and it's up to 
you to find out what they are. 

Next take the question of race, color or religion. Now 
these are all factors which influence buying, selling, and 
advertising. And consequently, you must know about them 
if you want to know your market. 

As a specific example, we have a dry shampoo called 
Minipoo. The South offers poor potential for this product 
because it can only be used on long hair. That rules out 
most of the Negro population and it means that we are 
much smarter to spend a buck advertising Minipoo in 
Rome, N. Y., than in Rome, Ga. 

Or take the factor of age. You might say, offhand, that 
age shouldn't be a consideration; that the life insurance 
tables show a fairly even spread of age groups nationally. 
But the actual fact is that there are sections of the United 
States (California, for example) where you have an above- 
average older population. And, as in our case, if you're 
promoting the sale of denture products, a knowledge of 
where they live can te most important. Our tv expendi- 
ture for Polident is heaviest this year on the Pacific Coast; 
so is our mouthwash advertising cost. Both items are used 
more by persons over 40 years of age than under. 

Seasonal factors, too, will affect your choice of markets. 
So know your markets, seasonally. In the drug businers. 
for inetance, the peak months of the year are usually the 
winter months and for a simple reason. As it gets colder 
people generally require medication more than durin:; 
those fcalmy spring days or during those summer months, 
or the spring and fall. These are the months when adver- 
tising of drug products are heaviest. But it isn't winter 
everywhere all year 'round, as the Florida and South- 
ern California public relations boys skillfully promoted. 
And consequently, the cold tablet advertiser looks at these 
sections differently than he looks at Kenr.e'mnk ;ort. Me. 
And similarly, the sun tan lotion advertiser doesn't have 
to wait for June and July everywhere. He can start his 





' <-^ Sm*w 



With 16 million radios in KIT* HI NS, 
21 million in BEDROOMS, 26 mil- 
lion in AUTOMOBILES, and mil- 
lion* more in even less likely placet, 
KTSA's programming h.is under- 
gone a major Operation in reaching 
special audiences. It's not only 
WHAT you say and WHIN \ou s.iv 
it . . . but WHAT you sav at the 
TIME you say it! 

NEW SOUND IN THE NEWS 

Strictly in line with the above, 
NEWS in the hands of NEWSMEN 
is making a new sound in the South 
Texas air. Now, veteran newspaper 
men edit and rewrite a continuous 
flow of news from IP, AP, and 
KTSA's own staff. This is fast, ac- 
curate reporting Ipeciall) edited for 
the audience AT THE TIME of the 
broadcast. FOUR main news peri- 
ods, PLUS news HEADLINES 20 
TIMES each broadcast day! 

MARKETING SCOOP! 

"THE SAN ANTONIO TOO FEW 
ADVERTISERS KNOW is the title 
of a study made by KTSA of MILI- 
TARY San Antonio. This is a con- 
densed compilation of facts about an 
UNUSUAL and HARD-TO-REACH 
market that buys and buys and bins 
to the limit of a S2SS MILLION 
annual payroll. How KTSA reaches 
92,t<~c of this READV-TO-BIV 
audience while they are actually on 
their way to shop is the story of a 
unique program called "BUMPER- 
TO-BUMPER If you'd like to 
know more and have a copy of the 
study . . . just say so! 

DID YOU HEAR KATY SAY? 

Katy, a charming brunette in a black 
mask, recently crystalized this phrase 
for South Texans when she appeared 
almost life-size in a six-column 
KTSA newspaper advertisement in 
three metropolitan newspapers. 
KTSA's new programming and pro- 
motion is paying off. To be 
QUOTED is an unfailing barometer 
of any station's popularity with the 
home folks. That's why we are so 
proud that more and more South 
Texans are saying, "DID YOU 
HEAR KATY SAY ?" 

STUDIO WISE 

New studios, new facilities, new 
talent, new programming, new pro- 
motion, new merchandising . . . these 
are the things that are creating the 
NEW LOOK at KTSA and the 
NEW SOUND on South Tca.in 
radios. 



R.prn.nt.d Nationally by: PAUL H. RAYMER CO 



- In Metropolitan San Antonio and KTSA's 
70-county South Texas Market. 




SAN ANTONIO metropolitan areacm, 



T!/» ON 559,700 
hou^os ] 52/560 



RADIO HOMES 
1/1/55 



140,510 



TOTAL RETAIL SALES . 

Food Stores .... 
Drug Stores 

Ealing A Drinking Hoe*. 

Gen. Merchandise Stores 

Apparel Stores 

Home Furnishings Stores 

Automotive Stores 

Filling Stations .... 

Building Materials, Hardware 



$535,749,000 

JI55.094 000 
17.197 000 
36 It 5 000 
75 784 000 
36 327.000 
It. 950. 000 
107,741.000 
30 136 000 
36.073.000 



SAN ANTONIO trading area -£352^ 

POPULATION 1/1/55 811,200 

RADIO HOMES 218,030 

CONSUMER SPENDABLE INCOME $1,091,982,000 

RETAIL SALES 749,678,000 

GROSS FARM INCOME 162,982 000 

Includes 23 counties of Son Antonio's immediate Retail Trade Area 
all within KTSA's primory coverage. 



RADIO STATION 

OWNED AND OPERATED RY O R. MITCHEll CO 

S000 w. 550 kc Full Tim« CUor.d Regional Chonn.l 

Studios: 1130 Broadway P. O. Bio 1161 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 

INC. 




11 JULY 1955 



237 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



PAGE 14 



schedules in the middle of winter in Miami. Again, the 
moral: Know your markets. 

Regionally, too, there are differences in general con- 
sumer buying attitude that might surprise you. 

You learn this when you launch a new product and then 
interview consumers in various sections of the country. 

The folks on the Pacific Coast are the most progressive. 
They'll try anything new. The folks in New England are 
just the opposite. Being of a conservative nature, they 
adopt a "We'll wait and see" attitude. This applies Inci- 
dentally, to both retailers and consumers. And in the 
South, the great regional difference which can make or 
break a new product is a price factor. 

This is the land of the 10c aspirin, and the 5c stomach 
remedy. Sure, you can sell higher-priced drugs in the 
South, but it's a much tougher proposition than in almost 
any other section of these United States. 

Regional factors, too, can affect your distribution pat- 
tern. In the Southwest, for example, the food stores were 
among the first to start carrying drug items. Today they 
still lead the United States from that standpoint. So unless 
you know your market, you can easily go wrong in Texas 
by concentrating on the drug stores when the food outlets 
there deserve as much or more attention. 

And geographically you have price considerations the 
uninitiated will often learn about too late. Texas doesn't 
observe the Fair Trade price laws, so you bring a new 
toothpaste into the Lone Star state and find that unless 
they cut price on it, your 63c size is fighting the same 
number of ounces of the leading brand priced at 35c. This 
is true in other non-Fair Trade States, too; so again, know 
your market, or suffer the consequences. 

Now if you happen to be in the business of advertising 
items used by families who own their own home, knowing 
your market can be all -important. For example, while 
across the United States generally 50% of our families 
own their own homes, this average varies from two out of 
three, or 67% in Michigan to only one out of three, 33%, 
in the District of Columbia. Similarly, as you study prod- 
ucts by classification you find wide swings geographically 
in consumer buying. And to make things even more 
complicated, you find that the buyer varies. 

On this latter point, if someone asked you who does 
most of the purchasing in the United States, you probably 
would say that women do 85% of the buying. And then 
gasp when you discover that 68% of men — not women — 
shop for groceries once a week or more. 

Know your market in terms of media, particularly in 
setting up test campaigns. This is emphasized first because 
so often advertisers will make a long-lasting mistake of 
far-reaching importance in the testing stage. 

I offer these simple, basic rules for selecting test markets. 
They have stood the test of time for us and we have 
rarely had to discard a test market after once establishing 
it. When we have, it's been primarily a case of unforseen 
local conditions forcing it, such as a sudden unemployment 
situation or a distributor who unexpectedly refused to 
cooperate. 

1. Don't choose too large a market. You'll learn just as 
much at a fraction of the cost in a Fort Wayne or a 
Dayton. Why pick New York or Chicago as a testing 
ground? 

2. Make certain the market is isolated from other im- 
portant markets. For example, Paterson, N. J., is a good 
city, but a poor test city. 

3. See that the test market is diversified. Not too 
strongly rural, but not too heavy industrially; a good 
mixture of working classes. 

4. Check to see that the media you use will adequately 
cover your testing area. And make certain, at the same 
time, that you know what the coverage area will be. 

5. Test long enough to find out what you want to know. 
Don't be so impatient that you wind up cutting off your 
advertising just when its cumulative effect is starting to 
sell your product. 

6. Cover your test market with research. Store audits, 
consumer interviews, retailer visits, wholesaler checks. In 



that way you won't have to guess from your factory ship- 
ments as to how you're actually doing. 

This means, in effect, knowing your market. And a test 
market can be deceiving, unless you choose it carefully 
and check it even more carefully. 

Know your market, too, in terms of competition. 

Quite often a test market is selected in which all of the 
above outlined basic requirements are met. Then, suddenly, 
you discover a strongly entrenched local brand, the kind 
you'd never encounter on a national basis. Or, just as 
suddenly, you discover that your competitor is using the 
market for a testing operation which, while interesting, 
influences your result in an abnormal way. 

Know your market, too, in terms of advertising cost to 
sales. All this means, of course, is that you know what it 
is costing you in advertising dollars to secure sales — 
market by market. Not all markets will come in at the 
same advertising to sales ratio, but you must pre-determine 
how much you are willing to spend to obtain sales in each 
individual market. 

We do this by setting up a sales potential for each im- 
portant city in the United States. Alongside of this figure 
we plot what our proposed or actual expenditures are for 
advertising in these cities. It's up to us, then, whether we 
want to keep it, lower it, or increase it as an expenditure 
designed to secure sales. 

But you would be surprised at the number of national 
advertisers who completely neglect the simple method of 
checking advertising cost to sales. At the heart of their 
neglect is an illusion of being "national," of running in 
national publications or even on national networks, and 
feeling that the only way to look at advertising cost to 
sales is on a U.S. basis. 

Well, it just isn't so. 

Such advertisers, I think, would be wise to remember 
what the words "United States" mean. They mean just 
what they say. United States — a collection of states, a 
collection of markets. And no national publication or 
network reaches into all states on an equal basis. That 
being so, the advertising costs will differ by states just as 
the sales results will also differ. 

So know your market in terms of cost. State by state, 
or city by city, you should have a clear-cut picture of what 
your advertising expenditure amounts to and what it is 
costing you to advertise in these respective markets. 

Which brings us to another media point — the buying of 
media, by markets. 

Set out, as we often do, to buy radio or television across 
these United States and you soon discover you've taken 
on a complex job. I don't want to go into the rudiments 
of timebuying, especially with people like yourselves who 
are the experts on the subject. But isn't it a fact that 
since you can't buy at the same cost-per- 1,000 everywhere 
that automatically each market becomes different? 

And since every market doesn't contain the same number 
of stations or the same amount of transmitting power 
per station that you can't buy radio or tv with a simple 
formula, such as five announcements per week in all 
cities? 

HOW RADIO AND TV DIVIDE THE MARKET 



J. A. WARD: Frankly, I don't know the 
answer to "What constitutes a market?" 
The answer requires a knowledge of the 
product to be sold, its uses, its competi- 
tion and its distribution. In the final 
analysis markets are people who may 
buy the item you are trying to sell. It 
is to them you aim all your sales am- 
munition. 

The first step usually taken in defin- 
ing your markets is to classify people into convenient 
groupings so that you can analyze your marketing prob- 
lem more systematically. Standardized groupings based 
on objective nose counts of age, sex, geographic location 




Nofftimf — 
bui luriJuni) 

Ottbdh 



OUR ADVERTISERS HAVE KNOWN IT FOR YEARS 





PHILADELPHIA 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



and buying power are essential to knowing your market; 
but they may be misleading unless further evaluations are 
made in terms of interest in the product and its competi- 
tion. 

As a market researcher, I'm the last one to minimize 
the importance of these definitions of markets — but I think 
I can make a better contribution to your thinking today 
by restricting myself to the application of my subject to 
your field — radio and tv. 

Our organization has just completed a study of air 
media which I believe permits for the first time market 
interpretations of these media in terms of people. Prac- 
tically all previous measurements of the size and charac- 
teristics of the various markets reached by air media have 
been expressed in terms of sets or families. This means 
these measurements give equal value to all families regard- 
less of the number of people they contain. Our study 
differs from these because we have given equal value to 
each individual person, thereby permitting a specific 
examination of the markets represented by air media. 

This difference in the unit of measurement developed 
information that is in many respects, dramatically dif- 
ferent from previous data. 

Perhaps the most startling difference we found was in a 
comparison of the amount of time spent with each media 
during a given day. Previous measurements have indicated 
that the average tv set use is much greater than average 
radio use during a day. Our study indicates that among 
all viewers about two hours a day is spent viewing tele- 
vision and approximately the same amount of time is de- 
voted to listening to a radio by the average radio listener. 

The point is that most research has measured total set 
use, which obviously is greater than the amount of time 
most individuals can spare from their normal daily 
activities. For example, in my home the television set is 
on for probably more than five hours each day; however, 
there is not a single person in the family who can or does 
spend that much time viewing television. They come in 
and out of the audience at different times. 

Thus, by one form of measurement, the family unit, the 
casual interpretation would be that tv enjoys clear 
superiority over radio. Our study clearly indicates that this 
is not so — that there is a high degree of equality between 
both media over a full day of operation. 

For example, we found that in the course of an average 
weekday, both radio and tv reach about 60% of all the 
people in the country over the age of five. And, instead 
of the commonly accepted idea that tv dominates the 
major proportion of air time — by air time I mean the total 
radio-television exposures combined — the amount of time 
devoted to each medium is about the same. 

The reason the study shows this is simple; we measured 
people and their activities. And in doing so, we measured 
markets. 

Now, of course, there are some major differences between 
the markets reached by radio and those reached by tv. 
Television reaches more six-to- 12-year-olds than does 
radio. Radio reaches more persons in rural areas than 
does tv. Radio reaches more adults, especially women. 

But this is over a full day. And nobody can buy or sell 
all of radio or all of tv, so the question of what sort of 
market you can reach by using one or the other medium 
narrows down to specific time periods and networks. 
In each such segment of the total time, the markets or 
people you can reach may vary considerably. 

For example, before 6 p.m.; of all the time people spend 
with radio or television 70% is devoted to radio listening. 
After 6 p.m., 75% of all such time is devoted to tv. And 
furthermore, of the total time people devote to air media, 
roughly half occurs before 6 p.m., the other half after 
6 p.m. 

A part of the process of knowing your markets involves 
knowing why these things occur. We developed some 
fairly clear reasons as to why radio-tv markets divide up 
the way they do. The basis of our study was a complete 
measurement of the daily living habits of the people in 
PAGE 15 this country. We studied their activities throughout the 



day, from the time they got up in the morning until 
they went to bed at night. 

Of all this waking time each individual has during a 
full day, a certain proportion is devoted to dressing, eating, 
working and leisure time. What we found was that people 
can and do listen to the radio when engaged in any of 
these activities. Of course, the nature of the medium 
permits this. The housewife can listen while she works. 
Also, most homes have kitchen radios or car radios, in 
addition to a living room radio. So people can listen in 
more than one place. 

Tv, on the other hand, is more restricted. In the first 
place, almost nine out of 10 tv sets are located in living 
rooms. In the second place, full use of tv requires the use 
of the eyes as well as the ears and makes more difficult 
the performance of other chores simultaneously. Thus 
the vast majority of all tv viewing is done during leisure 
time — and most leisure time occurs in the evening hours. 

All of this points up the fact that radio and tv as a 
whole, are not what you could call a market, but represent 
many, many markets, different for each broadcast period. 

It was one of the objectives of our study to examine the 
characteristics of these hundreds of individual markets. 
To do so we made analyses of individual time periods by 
the age, sex, geographic location and income of the people 
we studied. Some of each type were, of course, listening 
to the radio, some were watching television; thus we are 
able to examine the audience composition of both media, 
and to study the market factors that buyers and sellers 
of time require for the best implementation of these 
media. 

Up to this point, I have been making comparisons and 
contrasts between radio and tv. Now I would like to tell 
you a little about what we found with respect to how these 
characteristics vary by periods. For the sake of avoiding 
confusion I'll stick to radio. 

I mentioned earlier that there are always some sub- 
jective standards for measuring markets — such as the 
degree of interest people have in your product. Let me 
take this point and develop it a little in the light of our 
findings about radio. 

As I said before, we found that radio listening goes on 
even while the listener is engaged in other activities. Now. 
if you are concerned with a food product, it might seem 
important to you to reach women while they are in the 
act of preparing or eating food. There are certain times 
each day when most women are doing just that. 

Many of them are also listening to the radio while they 
work. Radio has the peculiar ability to reach people at the 
point of use. For instance, we have analyzed a number of 
time periods and networks and find that there is a 
period where one network delivers over three and one half 
million listeners, of which over one-third are women who 
are in the process of eating or preparing food. 

Exactly 45 minutes later, this same network delivers 
the same total audience but only one-tenth of this audi- 
ence is composed of women preparing food at the time. 

We also found that during the period between 4 and 
5 p.m., New York time, there are more people in this 
country riding in automobiles than at any other weekday 
time. The gasoline manufacturer who wants to reach 
potential customers by means of the auto radio will 
examine such a time period carefully. He might ask who 
are the people riding in automobiles at this time: what 
proportion are men, because there is another time period, 
where fewer people are riding in automobiles but when 
more men are in the auto-radio audience. 

It is my belief that it's more important for you to know 
the composition of the audiences in the time periods you 
are buying or selling than it is to know the sheer size 
of the audiences, whether the size is expressed in terms of 
total sets, total families or total individuals. Any measure- 
ment you can obtain, of course, adds to your knowledge of 
the market — but in radio and tv, circulation or audience 
is shifting so constantly that its characteristics become 
vitally important, lest you waste your ammunition on the 
wrong targets. 




a DOUBLE Ringer 
in the Detroit A--*- 1 ^ 




# 



—all adds up to a greater sales winner! 



@6ec& t£e (?<ut{ 



Channel 9 
325,000 Watts 



CKLW radio covers a 15,000,000 
population area in 5 important 
states. The lowest cost major 
station buy in the Detroit area. 



CKLW-TV penetrates a popu- 
lation grand total area of 
5,295,700 in which 85% of aU 
families own TV sets. 



@ CS ^TO 



GUARDIAN BLDG.. DETROIT 
ADAM YOUNG TELEVISION CORPORATION, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

11 JULY 1955 



/ 



£6ee6 t£e 'Jactei 



800 kc. Radio 
50,000 Watts 



J. E. CAIMPEAU. PRESIDENT 

241 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



I wish I could tell you of some simple, easy way to get 
these facts. Unfortunately, there is none. Even the study 
we have just completed (for MBS) covers only the broad 
highlights and will become rapidly obsolete. It is too 
costly a process to put on a month-to-month basis. It will 
take us another six months just to analyze it in detail. 

One thing I can recommend — and this I do very strongly 
— and that is that you use your influence to get more data 
about the internal composition of audiences — ages, sexes, 
and so forth, of listeners — in other words, people — so that 
you can know your markets better. 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Q. After selecting a test market how long should a test 
campaign last and how many announcements should be 
used? 

A. (From George Abrams) I don't think there's any 
single answer to that question, but I think I can give you 
an answer based on the number of variations that we've 
employed in using test cities for various types of products. 
In the first place don't make your test too short. We 
rarely go into a test operation without running for at 
least six months. However, there are certain types of 
test operations which you may call saturation or penetra- 
tion. We go in with great intensity and you couldn't keep 
this pace going with a heavy spot tv or spot radio schedule 
longer than a 13-week period. After your advertising 
runs, don't stop your test operation there; keep your 
research going so that you know what the after-effects of 
your advertising are. I mentioned that our test advertising 
is over a six-month period. We look at test markets for 
as long as two years. 



person is about equal to radio listening per person. How 
does he explain that? 

A. <From Jim Ward) Measurement of a set accumu- 
lates the total exposures of all people. Your set at home 
undoubtedly will be in use at sometime when you're not 
there. You will undoubtedly use it yourself. Any mechan- 
ical or over-all measurements of the set would total the 
use while you were not at home and the use while you 
were at home. When divided by the number of people who 
were exposed, that will show a material difference. For 
example, I think I said that my set at home is in use about 
five hours a day. This is true. It seems to go all the time. 
But if you were to measure the actual exposure of any 
individual in my family you'd find that in total he does 
not spend more than an hour or an hour and a half with 
the set. He then has the demand of other activities which 
will pull him away from it. 

Q. How do you judge market potential for a new product? 
A. (From George Abrams) That's not an easy one, be- 
cause in many cases you go into a market with a new 
type of product as we just recently did, and suddenly 
through the sales recorded you suddenly realize that poten- 
tial of this market of this type or category of product is 
much larger than you ever realized; that suddenly people 
find a need for it and maybe a latent need that they've 
always had; that suddenly they're going out and buying 
the type of product that they formerly didn't buy. In 
most cases, though, we judge potential for a new type of 
product through either recorded information, such as 
Nielsen, who will let you know the total market or through 
whatever public trade information we can get. * • • 



Q. Where market A has a record of buying more mouth- 
wash per thousand population than market B, would you 
consider going into B rather than A with your mouthwash 
in an effort to create a greater demand? 
A. (From George Abrams) I think the answer to that 
one is that you don't select your market on one fact 
alone. I would say offhand that you're better off in going 
to a market where more mouthwash is used than going 
into a market where people use less. But I mentioned 
before that age is an important factor, and competition is 
an important factor. You take a variety of factors and 
assemble them before you make your decision. 

Q. Is it not true that increases in television and radio 
listening have cut down on reading time of magazines and 
newspaper advertising? 

A. They have. There's been a tremendous redistribution 
of all leisure time. This is particularly true of magazines 
and television too. The longer a television set lasts in a 
home the less time is devoted to it, because it demands 
leisure time; it demands attention. 

Q. Do you have any proven test markets in New England? 
A. i From George Abrams) Yes. Actually one of the 
best test markets in the United States, and the one that 
generally shows up in Sales Management's list of test 
cities, is Hartford, Connecticut. But is isn't typically New 
England. Hartford happens to be a market with good 
diversified industry, a good office worker category, has 
good media, and we've used it in the past with fairly good 
results. However, it was being over-tested. South Bend, 
Ind., for example, calls itself the number one test city 
of the United States. But the fact that Nielsen uses it 
as a test city; the fact that so many advertisers quickly 
think of South Bend or Hartford makes it right from the 
start unattractive. Indiana is exposed to the words of 
"amazing new discovery" so often that it loses its golden 
ring after awhile. 

Q. Jim Ward said tv viewing per home is much higher 
PAGE 16 than radio listening per home, but that tv viewing per 



Seminar U. 

AGENCY PRACTICES: SAINTS AND SINNERS 

Speakers: George Kern, associate media director, Lennen 
& Newell; Bob Reuschle, national sales manager, WLAC- 
TV, Nashville (then national sales manager WHUM-TV, 
Reading, Pa.). Moderator of seminar was Vera Brennan, 
head timebuyer, Scheideler, Beck & Werner, New York. 



RELATIONSHIPS AND RESPONSIBILITES 

GEORGE KERN: In discussing the sub- 
ject for this meeting with the Planning 
Committee, they agreed that we would 
deviate somewhat from the topic "Agen- 
cy Practices — Saints and Sinners," at 
least as far as my talk was concerned, 
in order to cover two subjects which we 
felt were particularly important to 
younger buyers and sellers of broad- 
casting time: 
The agencies' relationship with their clients and with 
the broadcasters, and 

The agencies' responsibilities to their clients and to 
the broadcasters. 
This might be "Old Hat" to many of you, but we 
thought it a worthy reminder to all of us. 

If we all have a clear understanding of these two sub- 
jects <1> our relationship with each other and (2) our 
responsibilities to each other and keep them always In 
mind, we are going to get along a lot better. It's under- 
standing the other fellow's problems and assuming our 
own responsibilities that makes for a smooth working 
team. 

Now let's look at the agency and its relationship with 
its client and the broadcaster: 

An agency's position is a peculiar one In that it acts as 
an agent for both the client and the broadcaster. An 
agency therefore becomes a buyer and a seller and as a 




2. 




OVER HALF THE FOOD STORE SALES IN INDIANA 

are made to the ^^(^f5^\^?fe 



people served 



by WFBM-TV 

m 

NO OTHER INDIANA 
TV STATION 
DELIVERS 
SO MUCH 



Food store sales state-wide: 

$1,049,984,000 

Food store sales WFBM-TV-wide: 

$536,0o4,000 



WFBM-TV 
INDIANAPOLIS 

Represented Nationally by 
the Katz Agency 

Affiliated with WFBM-Rodio; WOOD AM 

& TV, Grand Ropids; WFDF, Flint; WTCN, 

WTCN-TV, Minneapolis, St. Paul 




11 JULY 1955 



243 



mWA TIMEBUYING 
^ BASICS 



PAGE 17 



result is right in the middle. It buys for its client and 
sells for the broadcaster. The agency takes its orders 
from the client and gives orders to the broadcaster who 
pays the agency its commissions. 

This is a point most agency timebuyers, their bosses and 
their clients too often lose sight of. It's the broadcaster 
who pays the agency commission — not the client. So let's 
treat him with the respect he deserves. % 

The thing we must all remember — advertiser, broad- 
caster, agency — is that we are a team and that we are 
in this together. We survive and succeed only so long as 
we work as a team. We need each other. The advertiser 
needs the vehicle to carry his advertising message — and 
he needs the agency to prepare the kind of message that 
will produce sales results which will enable him to con- 
tinue to use the vehicle. The station needs the agency to 
represent him in selling the effectiveness of his vehicle 
and keep it sold by the results gained from the sales- 
producing messages he prepares. The agency needs both 
the advertiser and the broadcaster — the advertiser to hire 
him and the broadcaster to pay him. 

Let's remember this when we deal with each other — we 
have a direct relationship with each other. 

Now let's talk about Responsibility : 

You remember I said that if we all assume our respon- 
sibilities, we'll get along a lot better — and do a better job. 
As far as an agency is concerned its first responsibility 
is to its client — the advertiser. 

The agency acts on behalf of its client in all his deal- 
ings with the broadcaster. As an expert in the advertising 
profession, it recommends without prejudice the stations 
and time periods which will best fit its client's needs and 
is responsible for producing the best selling messages that 
result in the continued use of the stations which produce 
the results. 

The agency is responsible for protecting its client in 
every way possible in its negotiations with the broad- 
caster. It must see that its client gets the best available 
time periods at the lowest possible cost. It must protect 
its client contractually on rates, rebates, preemptions, 
cancellation privileges, legal entanglements — and every 
other way. And remember it is the agency who is solely 
liable to the broadcaster to fulfill all of the terms, and 
conditions of the contract it signs on behalf of its client. 

The agency has a responsibility to the broadcaster be- 
yond its contractual commitments. 

It should respect the important part the broadcaster 
plays in the community he represents. It should regard 
the broadcaster as an equally important part on a three- 
man team. It should give the broadcaster an opportunity 
to submit proposals on a competitive basis — and be ready 
to tell him why he did not get the order. 

In the interest of its client and the industry as a whole, 
the buyer should be fair in his dealings with broadcasters 
in requests for: make-goods, credits for interruptions and 
preemptions, publicity and merchandising . 

Remember, any request which puts a higher overhead 
on a station's operation is ultimately going to be reflected 
in the rate card. So let's not force stations to render ser- 
vices which raise the rates to the point where they kill 
the medium. Sure, take advantage of all the services a 
station has to offer — but don't abuse them to the point 
they affect the rate structure. 

Now, I want to get back to the subject of contracts: 

We are fortunate in having a standard contract which 
was developed after many months of work on the part of 
the NARTB and the 4 A's and is accepted pretty generally 
in the industry. It contains a few clauses which some of 
you may not agree with, but as one of the 4A representa- 
tives who labored over the drafting of all the clauses, I 
feel we ended up with something we can all live with. It 
seems to cover the agency and the broadcaster in an 
equitable way. The thing I want to explain however, is 
that you should not just take this contract for granted. 
Don't just sign it because it has the seal of approval of 
the NARTB and the 4A's. 

Know what the contract contains. What are the agency's 




obligations to the stations? What are the stations' obliga- 
tions to the agency? What are the cancellation privileges 
on the part of the agency — the station? What happens 
when your program is preempted? What protection do 
you get on rate increases? Who indemnifies whom — and 
for what? The knowledge of the terms and conditions of 
this standard contract on the part of buyer and seller has 
resulted in the unusual relationship which exists between 
agency and broadcaster. Because of the close cooperation 
between broadcasters and agencies through their respec- 
tive associations in the development of a standard con- 
tract, verbal orders get the acceptance they do. A time- 
buyer's word to a station or network is all that is neces- 
sary to kick off a million-dollar campaign. 

There is a code of ethics in this business that says a 
man's or woman's word is all we need. Let's keep it 
that way. 

Let's not have any one — the client, account executive, or 
anyone else have us try to get out from under a com- 
mitment, just because it is not in writing — or because the 
contract has not yet been signed. 



\ SELLER'S ADVICE TO BUYERS 

ROBERT M. REUSCHLE: I think you 
will admit, today's subject, Agency Prac- 
tices, is a broad one to say the least. 
The part that bothered me was the 
second part of the title: Saints and Sin- 
ners! Well obviously, there isn't a Sin- 
ner in the house! 

We can cover the whole subject quick- 
ly by simply saying: "Every timebuyer 
should try being a salesman . . . and 
every salesman should just try being a timebuyer." Or, to 
put it more bluntly, "did you ever have to stay home and 
feed and diaper the kids while your wife spent the whole 
day in New York shopping?" No — the other fellow's job 
is not always as easy as it looks. 

Somebody said the other day, "The best advertising men 
are those who best understand women" . . . and I like to 
think, "The best timebuyers are also those who best under- 
stand salesmen." Salesmen are the catalyst in our whole 
economy . . . something like the sparkplug in your car. 
Therefore let's begin by recognizing that saleswork, like 
timebuying, is a profession too . . . it's not "piddling" . . . 
nor it is "peddling." 

Probably some of you might be asking yourselves how 
to learn timebuying quickly One of the best ways is to 
ask questions of salesmen. (I know it helped me tremen- 
dously.) Take the salesman into your confidence when- 
ever you do so so. You might be surprised how much he 
can help you. Admit what you don't know, or don't under- 
stand. Don't try to bluff — an inquiring mind will pay you 
great dividends, and you and the salesman will both 
profit by it. 

Salesmen can often help you sell your ideas on radio-tv 
values if you will welcome sales calls on your account 
executives and clients. Timebuyers feel they have the right 
to contact stations direct, and rightly so, for it leads to 
a better understanding and a solution of many problems 
all the way around. Of course, timebuyers should let the 
salesman know this is being done, just as the salesman 
should first cover the agency before going to the client. 
Sales calls on clients is not a serious complaint. However, 
it is a fact that the print media boys have a better work- 
ing relationship in this regard. 

In other fields of endeavor, many thousands of dollars 
are exchanged or committed by a simple raising of the 
hand, or a nod of the head. When a station representative 
gets a telephone order, many wheels start to turn. For 
example, here is an actual experience (names of all "char- 
acters" will be omitted.) : 

The timebuyer has just called the rep, and apparently 
gave him an order. 

The time purchase is written, wired, phoned or tele- 







STATIONS 



Ids / " I" '. ii I \ 

KANSAS CITY: KCMO Radio & KCMO-TV „««,»„, 
SYRACUSE: WHEN Radio & WHEN -TV ,- ta *,„„ 
PHOENIX: KPHO Radio & KPHO-TV , „.,. »„„„ 
OMAHA: WOW Radio & WOW -TV SMStf c ° 






Affiliated Wi 



h. BetterHomes .„«. ^ ul M agazn 



es 



and Gardens 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



typed to the station for final clearance and confirmation. 

The rates are double-checked at station and reps 
offices. At the station, the traffic or sales service depart- 
ment checks to be sure the schedule is not adjacent to 
competitive advertising and that the time is available, 
or can be cleared. This often means checking with the 
commercial manager to be absolutely sure the time 
wasn't on option, or that the spots weren't sold that 
morning by the local sales force. Maybe the commercial 
manager has to chase around and find his local sales 
manager. He finally gets him on the phone. "Joe, he 
says, can you move that Monday 9:00 p.m. break for 
Meyers Music Store so we can take a national spot in 
there and confirm a 52-week order, five a week, from 
a big national account?" 

Joe has to call the boss back because he fainted at 
the phone when he thought of what Meyer was going 
to say. But somehow, Joe does the impossible. 

Traffic calls programing and film departments to be 
on the lookout for the film . . . you see, it's supposed to 
arrive by late plane Saturday, and the first spot starts 
Sunday ! 

Meanwhile, at representative headquarters in New 
York, the salesman is beginning to sweat. He has al- 
ready had two calls from the timebuyer who says, "Well, 
what about it ... do you want the order or don't you?" 
Also, the salesman has already told his boss the good 
news. "Finally cracked it ... 52 weeks too!" 

Why he had even entered the sale on his SECRET 
billing record! 

The station comes through with the confirmation 
okay, and the rep calls the timebuyer to give him the 
good word. BUT, lo and behold the buyer says he 
couldn't wait any longer . . . the competition came in 
and offered spots next to Gobel & Groucho! 

You see, the timebuyer thought he had told the sales- 
man . . . "If you get me that spot next to Lucy, you've 
got a firm order for the other four." 

Three weeks later our hero gets off the hot seat with 
his station by getting half the schedule back. 

Ten weeks later the big 52-week account cancels and 
switches to — spot radio. 

Maybe that story sounds exaggerated to you, but I hope 
it helps make a point — how important it is to be clear 
and precise because in our business telephone orders are 
a commitment. 

Further, just because this is a pressure business is no 
reason to keep the pot boiling all the time. 

Station people would like to see timebuyers make more 
trips into the field to see markets and observe local con- 
ditions first hand. Your clients and account executives 
usually have this experience or go out and get it by riding 
delivery trucks; calling on jobbers; selling their products 
from behind the retail counter; checking shelf display and 
merchandising etc. While it is true that the busy time- 
buyer is often confined to his desk, it is hoped the buyers 
will take every opportunity to get out in the field and at 
the very least, get the feel of some local markets. When 
you see the local shows and meet the personalities, you 
will have a much better idea of what you bought and the 
kind of audience this show reaches. You will discover 
new ways to use and merchandise these programs. Just 
think of some of the New York programs you are so 
familiar with and I think you will agree, if you can make 
more trips to stations you will be even better buyers. 
Imagine yourself as a salesman talking to a timebuyer 
about a market west of the Hudson River, when the buyer 
has never visited that market . . . particularly when you 
have never been there yourself! 

In my early days as a buyer I once had a tendency to 
have preconceived notions about — 

"My client will only buy 50,000 watters." or "We can 
only buy network stations" etc. 

Just as the character of our business keeps changing 

so do the relative values of radio-tv stations. You all 

know that power, frequency, network affiliation and pro- 

PAGE 18 gram or personality changes can sometimes quickly affect 



a station's audience pulling power. It is possible for one 
station to go from independent to network affiliate, and 
increase its audience. The same thing can happen in re- 
verse. Perhaps just a short six months ago you considered 
station "X" to be the buy in its area but something hap- 
pened in the meantime. I remember once calling the 
client to announce happily: "I have been able to get your 
spots in that hot disk jockey show, The Katzenjamer Kid 
only to have the client tell me, Katzenjammer moved 
over to the other station two months ago! 

Remember the station rep has a responsibility to his 
client too, the station. He is at least responsible for know- 
ing what campaigns are breaking and getting a shot at 
the business. The point is, you can do a better job for 
your client, and yourself, if you ask for availabilities on 
all stations in the market before you buy. 

The sales fraternity is always a little concerned about 
the way some media market lists are prepared for print 
and radio-tv . . . (and that's probably the understatement 
of the year) and while it is true that the seller of time 
can never be in a position to know the intimate details 
of an advertiser's marketing and media strategy, just one 
word of caution: ranking markets for local media use by 
such yardsticks as Households; Effective Buying Income; 
Population; Retail Sales; ETC. . . . may all be important 
and useful approaches, but we wonder at times whether 
sufficient attention is given to the fact that you can't 
build a fence around a radio or television station signal. 
These media and their programing fare have large audi- 
ences beyond the metropolitan city, where people in the 
urban-rural areas are influenced by the advertising on 
these two electronic media. Many urban-rural families do 
a large share of their purchasing in the big cities . . . thus 
inflating the meaning perhaps of retail sales in that city. 
To assume that magazines have deep penetration right 
across the country is a mistake. 

For example: (and here comes a commercial) one of the 
largest weekly magazines reaches about 14% of the fami- 
lies in WHUM-TV's area . . . and only 19% of all the 
people if we allow 4.75 readers per copy to account for 
pass-on circulation. Remember this 19% is its total poten- 
tial audience; we haven't taken into account any research 
ratings on the reading or noting of any ad. Markets are 
people, wherever they are, and radio-tv reaches them. best. 
Salesmen would like to see more emphasis put on radio- 
tv's total audience by the timebuyers who help to sell it. 

There is one small gripe salespeople have. It is the 
amount of time wasted in advertising agency reception 
rooms. Timebuyers calculate cost-per-1,000, cost-per-rat- 
ing-point, cost-per-commercial. But did you konw that: 
the cost-per-hour, in reception rooms, per salesman is 
about $5.48? 

Please try to remember that a salesman's time is just 
as valuable as yours. We know that all too often time- 
buyers are called into those inevitable meetings at the 
last minute . . . but do the guy a favor and see that he 
isn't told of this after waiting around for half an hour. 
Brief your pretty secretary on this problem. . . . "Marilyn" 
might be able to come to the lobby and handle the call 
for you. And for us, the call won't be a total loss. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 



Q. The salesman honestly thinks a certain timebuyer is 
doing a very poor job. Is it considered unethical for the 
salesman to say something to the timebuyer 's superior? 
A. (From Bob Reuschle) I think that depends an awful 
lot on individuals and the problem itself. Perhaps I can 
best answer it by citing an experience I had as head of a 
timebuying department. The sales manager for a group 
of stations called me and said, "Bob, our fellow is having 
an awful tough time with Mr. X at your company." I 
said, well, so are a lot of other fellows, including me. But 
he's still a good buyer. The sales manager wanted to get 
together with me and see if we could smooth it out. The 



hove everything else ! 




11 JULY 1955 



247 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



salesman was so distraught he told his boss, "You better 
take me off that agency." I said, don"t do that, we like 
him, he is a helluva good salesman. Why not try this: 
Tell your salesman to go in and see the timebuyer, and I 
will not say anything about this phone call, and make the 
guy go to lunch, and sit down with him and say, "Look, 
I don't like you and you don't like me; let's find out what's 
wrong and try to straighten it out." In other words, put 
their cards on the table. About a week later the sales 
manager called Lack and said it worked beautifully. I 
don't know whether that answers the question, but it 
seems to me you have got to go right to the source of 
the problem, the individual you are dealing with. 

Q. How much should a buyer tell a salesman about a 
campaign? 

A. (Prom Bob Reuschle) Tell him how many markets 
you are going into and name the markets. Certainly tell 
him the buying pattern; that goes hand in glove with the 
number of markets. How much budget? I think that is 
none of his business. I think budget is between the client 
and the agency. In an individual market perhaps you 
have it worked out according to slide rule, and as long 
as you tell the other stations the same thing, sure, tell 
the salesman. If it is an undisclosed account, whether the 
product is in the house or in solicitiation, well, I will skip 
that one and say maybe that is one of the things we could 
talk a lot longer about. No time salesman likes to work 
on an account being solicited by an agency. Post mortems 
after the buyer has completed the deal — should he tell 
what he bought: I agree with George 1,000%. I think the 
salesman is entitled to know what you did buy and maybe 
he can come up with something else and improve the 
schedule. Why make a big secret of these things? • • • 



Seminar 



7. 



WHAT BUYERS, SELLERS EACH EXPECT 

Speakers: Ruth Jones, Procter & Gamble timebuyer, 
Compton Agency; Lewis Avery, president, Avery -Knodel. 
Moderator of this seminar was Gordon Gray, vice president 
and general manager, WOR and WOR-TV, New York. 



WHAT TIMEBUYERS EXPECT OF SALESMEN 




RUTH JONES: Every timebuyer appre- 
ciates how much a salesman can con- 
tribute to his learning in the business, 
particularly when the buyer is a trainee. 
When I first started to buy time, much 
of what I learned I learned from the 
salesman. 

The salesman can really be of terrific 
help to you. You all know that in your 
personal life you rely on your friends 
to help you and certainly your salesman is your friend. 
When I first started buying time, which was 10 years ago. 
I was a pretty scared person, and there were many times 
I didn't want to go in and ask my boss questions, because 
it is pretty elementary that you not let him know where 
your weaknesses are. It was really amazing to me how 
many times salemen would come to me and offer to heip 
me; not only with their own stations and with their own 
markets, but with stations in which they had absolutely 
no interest. So first I want to remind you to look upon 
your salesman as your friend. 

Now, as to what a timebuyer should expect of a sales- 
man, I marked it down as three things: first, that he know 
the agency and the client; second, that the salesman help 
create ideas (at the right time) ; and third, which of 
PAGE 19 course we all realize, that he provide good service. 



When you talk about knowing the agency and knowing 
the client, it would really help the buyers if the salesman 
would get to know how an agency is set up and who has 
responsibility for what. There are no two agencies that 
operate alike, even within the Procter & Gamble agencies, 
of which there are seven. Even though they are working 
for the same client, each one has a different way of oper- 
ating. The salesman should know which timebuyers make 
the decisions as to what media will be used and which 
timebuyers make the decisions as to which market will be 
used. The salesman should know what the client expects, 
particularly if it is a client that has very definite media 
strategies such as your soap companies and your food 
companies. Then, when the salesmen call on the buyers, 
they are not wasting time talking to them about things 
that either the buyer has very little control over or 
about ideas that the clients themselves should be ap- 
proached on. 

As for point two, creating ideas, I am talking about 
times when the buyers run into trouble spending money 
— when they are trying to outline a campaign and are at 
a loss as to how they could spend the money properly — 
that is where the salesman can be of great help. 

However, a salesman should not try to help in the mid- 
dle of a heavy buying campaign, because that is when a 
buyer is terrifically harrassed; he should make suggestions 
between buying campaigns when a buyer has time to sit 
back and listen. Maybe at that particular moment the 
buyer will look at the salesman and say "I am not inter- 
ested," but he won't forget what has been said, and three 
months later the conversation will suddenly come from 
the subconscious to the conscious and he will act. 

Service, however, is most important. You always hear 
buyers complain that salesmen don't give them the proper 
service, and salesmen are always complaining about the 
agencies. But I repeat, service is the most important thing 
to a buyer, and I think perhaps the easiest way to explain 
what I am thinking of is to begin at the start of a buying 
campaign. 

Let us say that the markets and the stations have al- 
ready been selected and the buyer is getting ready to 
place the business. The first thing that a buyer asks for 
is availabilities. It would b3 a great help if the salesman 
would give the buyers exactly what they ask for. 

I have to assume that we buyers will be explicit. If 
we call up and say we want daytime announcements only, 
there is no point in giving us a lot of nighttime announce- 
ments. It isn't because we don't like nighttime announce- 
ments; it may be that the product is the type of product 
that should be advertised for women only. The copy de- 
partment, the account section, and the client have agreed 
that it is going to be daytime advertising. It is not a 
whim of the buyers. They want daytime availabilities. 

If we ask for minutes only, again that is something over 
which the buyer does not have control in many instances. 
(And I might add. also, it is a source of a number of 
arguments between the copy department and the buying 
department.) So instead of giving us an argument or fill- 
ing the availability sheets with a lot of breaks in the hopes 
that we will buy them, just give us the minutes. 

The next point: Being a buyer on Procter & Gamble 
you can appreciate that I can use only about one-tenth 
of the availabilities for my client, either because they are 
next to other Procter & Gamble shows, or Lever shows or 
Colgate shows, ad infinitum. Sometimes I get a sheet of 
paper and out of, maybe 25 or 30 announcements, there 
are only two that I can use. If the salesman would screen 
the spots and know that Procter & Gamble cannot buy 
next to Strike It Rich, or Colgate cannot buy next to 
Search For Tomorrow, it would make it a heck of a lot 
easier for us. 

Then the third point, and this is really a personal gripe: 
It would be very helpful if the reps could get together and 
have a standard, legible form for submitting availabilities. 
If each rep submits them in a different way and a buyer is 
tired, it really becomes a very serious practical problem, 
and sometime the salesmen do lose out. 





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For example, about two years ago I was buying a big 
radio campaign. I had exactly three days in which to buy. 
As every timebuyer knows, you don't do your buying dur- 
ing the day, you do it after hours. I had to buy about 
10 nighttime radio announcements in 180 markets. Well, 
you can imagine — 180 markets with an average of three 
stations in a market, and any number of availabilities — 
you must sympathize with what it is for a buyer to try and 
screen 5,000 to 7,000 announcements in three nights. It 
is pretty horrible. You are trying to do a good job for 
your client, but you get tired and by 10 or 11 o'clock at 
night you've just about had it. 

There was one rep who sent in the availabilities, and, 
honestly, it wasn't a question of reading down, it was a 
question of turning sheets around. And finally at 11 o'clock 
at night, and I hope that no one at Procter & Gamble 
hears about this, I got so mad that every time I picked 
up an availability sheet from this rep, I just threw it right 
into the wastebasket. I know it sounds terrible, but wait 
until you have to do it, and you will see what I mean. 
Maybe I cheated my client on one or two good spots, but 
after all, we are only human beings, and it's just tiring. 

I know the salesmen think we are asking for miracles. 
We call up at 4 o'clock in the afternoon and we say, 
"must have availabilities right away." We are sorry to 
have to do it at the last minute, but what can we do with 
clients? Anyhow, it is easier to argue with the salesman 
than it is with the client, let's put it that way. 

I think if the salesman could find some way to make it 
easier on our eyes and our disposition, it would help the 
buyers, and in the end it would really help the salesman. 

Another thing that we need from the salesman is more 
complete information on what schedules will cost, and 
that is particularly true these days in television where no 
matter how experienced you are, you can't be too experi- 
enced, because new problems are constantly arising. You 
forget if you are buying a show that there might be an 
editing charge, because you are going to splice in film, 
and it is very difficult and very embarrassing for a time- 
buyer to have to go back to an account executive or to 
the client later and say, "Gentlemen, I didn't know, but 
can I have another $25 for this or that?" 

Another thing < this happens to be a very controversial 
issue) is the question of salesmen arguing with buyers 
about ratings. I think perhaps I should state it in the 
positive way and say it would help the salesman a great 
deal if he would submit availabilities with the ratings that 
are acceptable to the agency or to the client. I am cer- 
tainly not going to get into a discussion as to whether 
Hooper is better than Pulse or Pulse is better than ARB. 
and so on down the line. But we do know that different 
agencies have different rules and different regulations, and 
there is very little to be gained by salesmen continually 
arguing that we don't use the right rating service or the 
station doesn't use it or you have no right to use it, and 
on and on. Many times it isn't up to the buyers to decide 
what the rating service is. The only way I can ever answer 
is that if I am buying based on ARB, for example, and a 
salesman comes in and says, "I have better spots on Pulse," 
I think a good idea for him is to sell the Pulse spots to 
the agency that prefers Pulse and I will buy spots where 
ARB ratings are good. 

It will all work out in the end. The salesman will sell 
all his spots, and he will certainly save an awful lot of 
wear and tear on both of us. 

The last part of the service is the problem of quick con- 
firmations. I know that lots of work has to be done on 
the telephone, but you know as well as I do with people 
being trained and with the confusion that can arise dur- 
ing a heavy spot campaign, particularly when you have 
so-called saturation plans, that we need quick confirma- 
tions in writing. 

It may seem a formality to you, but it isn't a formality 

to us, because we must confirm our schedules to the client. 

They are rightfully interested in how their money has 

been spent. If we are constantly being told later on, "Well, 

PAGE 20 there was a change here, or there was a change there," 



we have to notify the client, and they in turn have to 
notify the sales department four and five times. All that 
happens is that eventually everybody builds up a kind of 
antagonism and the buyer resents the salesman because 
he isn't quick, and the account executive begins to think 
that the buyer is not doing a job, and he goes back and 
gets mad at the salesman. Quick confirmations could 
help a great deal. 

One other thing, a salesman has an obligation to main- 
tain as good a relationship between an agency and a sta- 
tion as possible. Occasionaly, a station man will come in 
to see you without his rep. (The reps don't like it, but 
every once in a while they manage to sneak in) and I 
will find that my feelings or the agency's feelings or the 
client's feelings have not been properly transmitted to the 
station. The salesman should always tell the station 
exactly what happened and not always make it sound as 
if the timebuyers are pretty stupid or they are arbitrary. 
It is particularly true if a timebuyer tries very hard to be 
cooperative and to explain a situation in advance, and 
then that is not passed on to the station. 

Here is an example of what I am thinking. Recently 
we placed a campaign on a radio station. We told the 
salesman exactly how much money we had and how long 
the campaign was going to run. I believe it was something 
like eight weeks. 

We asked him to please tell the station to help pick out 
spots on the basis of a short campaign. In other words, 
we did not want the station to go to the trouble of mov- 
ing, let's say, local advertisers to give us what we wanted, 
and then suddenly turn around and discover it was a 
short-term campaign. That is the way we presented it. 
Why the rep did not pass this on to the station I do not 
know. Perhaps he hoped that there was going to be a 
renewal. But as a result, the station went ahead with the 
schedule and also did a marvelous promotion job for us 
on the particular product. 

Well, obviously, the station is angry with me, and I am 
angry with the rep, and it might take six months for me 
to see the station manager and explain to him that really 
and truly we had told the salesman that we were not go- 
ing to run a long campaign. 

I guess probably what it all narrows down to is that we 
are not always creatures of logic; sometimes we can be 
creatures of emotion and the people we like are the people 
we try to do things for, and the people that we don't care 
about, well, they are the one's that aren't going to get 
as much of a break. 

And so, I think, that probably the personal relationship 
between the agency and the salesman and the station can 
be very important for everybody getting exactly what 
they want. 

I can end this up by saying that I hope that the sales- 
men sitting here don't think that we want miracles, but, 
remember, my client does! So, there is nothing personal 
in it, but every time I buy a spot, regardless of the market, 
all I want is the / Love Lucy spot. 



WHAT SALESMEN EXPECT FROM BUYERS 

LEWIS H. AVERY: Back in the summer 
of 1943 when I was associated with the 
NAB, now the NARTB, and I knew all 
there was to know about buying and 
selling time, I wrote a booklet with the 
heading. "How to Buy Radio Time." 
I hope nobody can find a copy because 
it is a little bit obsolete right now. I 
am now beginning to learn something 
about the business. However, in the 
foreword of the booklet, which I wrote for Mr. Paul 
Morency's signature, there are some comments that I 
think we ought to keep in mind in this relation of buyer 
and seller. 





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251 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



"The purchase of radio time is neither a fine art nor an 
exact science. It does involve art in the sense of skill and 
performance acquired by experience, study or observation. 
It likewise involves science to the extent that facts and 
figures must be analyzed and interpreted." 

Actually, the approach to the purchase of broadcast 
time is not such an awesome and fearsome task as that 
description might suggest. As one leading advertising 
agency timebuyer put it, what you really buy is the possi- 
bility to develop an audience; what happens after you 
buy will be largely determined by the amount of imagina- 
tion you use. 

What are the ingredients of buying and selling time? 
I think the most important is availabilities. In that same 
booklet, I wrote that in my estimation availabilities 
whether related to time for a 20-second film, a one-min- 
ute participation or a newscast, were the most important 
commodity in radio or tv. 

Now, when that availability is presented, as Miss Jones 
has pointed out, it should be handled promptly by the 
salesman who presents it. It should be analyzed as quickly 
as possible, and obviously she was doing that when she 
received the 5,000th availability at 11 o'clock at night — 
and it should be purchased carefully. 

Since availabilities are the very lifeblood of this busi- 
ness, the seller ought to submit as complete and detailed 
information as he possibly can, preceding and following 
programs, competitive programs, ratings, and as Miss 
Jones has pointed out, by the preferred rating method. 
We will get to that a little later. Also, the correct rate 
for availability, the length of copy that can be employed 
at that time, and whether or not there are any competi- 
tive products nearby that might spoil its value. 

When I said they should be submitted promptly, I mean 
they should be submitted promptly in detail that will be 
helpful to the buyer. Now, the buyer has an equal obli- 
gation in my estimation to make as prompt a decision as 
possible. Obviously, the very perishable nature of avail- 
abilities is such that the best ones are going to go quick- 
ly, and you cannot tell whether you were the only individ- 
ual to whom those availabilities were submitted. 

Miss Jones mentioned confirmation of schedule. That, 
it seems to me, is one of the most important facets of our 
business in building confidence on the part of the buyer 
in the radio or television stations with which we may be 
doing business. Unfortunately, it is rarely possible for an 
advertising agency to issue a contract until sometime after 
the schedule may even have been started. In such cases, 
I think some simple form which ties down a meeting of 
the mind between buyer and seller is most essential. 

Now, let's take the case where an advertising agency 
asks for availabilities for a specific account. First of all, 
I think it is the obligation of the buyer to let the seller 
or the salesman know the name of the account, and if it 
is a multiple product the name of the product involved. 
I am a little bit bored with requests for availabilities for 
unidentified food accounts. It is almost impossible under 
those circumstances, in my estimation, for the seller to 
prepare an intelligent list of availabilities taking into ac- 
count the possibility of competitive situations, and I quite 
agree with Miss Jones when she points out that during the 
active buying seasons there is little opportunity for the 
person who is doing the buying to go into a detailed 
analysis of the market or the station or to review a new 
presentation on both. There is ample time to make those 
at a time when that is appropriate. 

On the other hand, it seems to me this stresses an 
equal obligation on the part of the buyer to devote suffi- 
cient time to presentations from salesmen of market and 
station statistics so as to gain added knowledge of the 
market and the station. 

It seems to me that the seller has an obligation to 
prepare presentation material concisely, to present it with 
a minimum number of words, to respect your time as a 
buyer, and correspondingly the buyer has an obligation 
to listen with reasonable attention. It may seem impossi- 
PAGE 21 ble to you when you request special information about a 



market or a station that representatives have such a 
scarcity of that information in their files. May I remind 
you that our relation to radio and television stations is 
not unlike your relations to the account you serve? We 
are in effect the agents of the radio and television sta- 
tions who have appointed us to represent them. As such 
we can only seek from the principal the information we 
want. If the station has in response to repeated requests 
failed to identify what a rumpus room program is, for 
example, we are just about as helpless as you are. But 
I can assure you that every representative makes a con- 
certed and thorough effort to get information about local 
programs in which you may have an interest. 

In the course of her talk, Miss Jones mentioned that 
she hopes we would furnish availabilities using the ratings 
of that rating service which was acceptable to the agency 
to whom we presented the availabilities. Actually, as most 
of you know, the majority of station managers, I surmise, 
would like to throw all rating services out of the window, 
even those who have the top ratings. We have in this 
industry the worst condition I have ever seen, and I have 
been in it since 1926. 

For example, there are currently seven research services 
on television viewing in New York City. I suppose you 
pays your money and you takes your cherce, but it cer- 
tainly is a hopeless mess. On the other hand, I would 
not myself advocate the extreme measures that many 
station managers urge. I think these rating services can 
serve us well. We must, however, be conscious of the 
weaknesses of all rating services and in so doing be aware 
that there is wide latitude in any specific rating. Be aware, 
too, that any rating must be at least 30 days old, and 
maybe older, and nothing is subject to more rapid change 
today than radio and television. 

There are other facets of the problem that seem to me 
to deserve a careful exploration on your part and ours. 
I have heard many agency people say that we as the sellers 
don't understand agency problems, and that may be true. 
I do think that if we are going to understand agency 
problems that you must be equally frank with us in telling 
us the individual problems with the accounts that you 
serve and the individual problems with an account for 
whom you may be buying at any specific time. There is 
also a corresponding facet of this — understanding the ad- 
vertiser's problems. On that score, I think we have been 
widely criticized as sellers, and yet the advertising agen- 
cies have long countenanced direct calls on advertisers by 
newspapers and magazines and their representatives and 
yet for the most part frown on calls that radio stations 
and television stations salesmen might make on those 
same advertisers. 

Actually, I think we have a distinct obligation never to 
tell an advertiser anything that we haven't already told 
you as the buyer. If you don't take action on something 
that we think ought to be done, are we or are we not 
wrong in going to the advertiser? Let's go back for a 
moment to the relationship I pointed out to you, that we 
are the agent of the radio and television stations we serve, 
and as such it is our job to make sales. We want to make 
them cleanly, properly, to our mutual benefit, but that is 
our responsibility to the station and only secondarily to 
you. Once we have an order, the obligation, I think, 
switches to the other side of the fence, and it is then up 
to us to see that you get the fairest and fullest possible 
treatment from the radio or television station which you 
are employing for a specific campaign. 

I think there is much ground for a better and richer 
understanding between us to improve this business in 
which we are both engaged. 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Q. If a representative's station does not subscribe to 
Rating Service X used by the agency but only to Service 
Y, how can he propose the best spots? 
A. (From Ruth Jones > This question implies that you 
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11 JULY 1955 



253 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



propose the best spots and assumes that we buy on rat- 
ings only. I should say that there isn't any good buyer in 
this business who buys by ratings only, and this applies 
to Procter & Gamble accounts for which we are always 
accused of buying on ratings and cost-per- 1,000 only. It 
isn't true. I don't know how many people believe it among 
the salesmen, but it is a fact. You cannot assume that if 
you do not have the best ratings you won't get the busi- 
ness, because there are a lot of other things that go into 
it; one of which i3 the kind of audience we want to reach. 

In other words, you might sit down and say, well, ac- 
cording to ratings, there is a spot that has a 10 rating, 
and there is another that has a 4 rating, and the 4 rating 
is out. It might happen that the 4 rating is adjacent to 
the program that has the kind of audience in which we 
are interested, and in that case we would buy the 4.0 
rating rather than the 10 rating. Therefore, it really 
isn't of any great disadvantage if you don't have the rat- 
ing service. 

If you will provide the spots that can be bought with- 
out any competitive problems, you will get your fair share 
of the business, because the agency will be able to look 
up the ratings themselves. It is impossible for the sales- 
man to pick out the best spots for us. 

Q. What are Ruth Jones' views about calling on ac- 
counts direct? 

A. (From Ruth Jones) I agree with Lew that there is 
no reason why a salesman shouldn't call on a client. 
There is only one thing that I think is important. Any 
time a salesman is going to call on a client, he first should 
tell the timebuyer that he is going to make the call and 
explain exactly what he is going to say. A lot of times it 
will help the salesman because the buyers, for the most 
part, are pretty grateful, if they get help. Sometimes 
salesmen have come in to me and said, "This is what I 
am going to say to your client, do you mind if I go there?" 
And I say "No." Then he will give me an idea of what he 
is going to say, and I can help point out the pitfalls and 
say, "Well, don't talk along those lines, because I happen 
to know so and so." 

I don't think a good buyer will ever ask a salesman not 
to see a client. All he will ask is that he is not put in the 
embarrassing position of having a client call up after- 
wards saying, "What do you think of such and such a 
show," and have the buyer sit there and think, "I will 
kill that salesman, because I don't know what the client 
is talking about." 

Q. Why is a rating inevitably 30 days old? 
A. (From Lew Avery) It takes about that long to tabu- 
late them, unless they are telegraphed in or the method 
of tabulating is speeded up. My point was simply that 
since this whole industry is in such a state of flux at the 
present time, no rating can be particularly meaningful 
except as a guide or as an indication of a trend. 

Q. Lew, don't you think that your salesmen should ap- 
proach the agency with the rating service they use rather 
than the highest number they can find? 
A. <From Lew Avery) Once I was a salesman. I al- 
ways used the highest number I could find. I think a 
salesman should give the agency the rating service they 
request if it is available through the station represented 
by that salesman. On the other hand, if there are two or 
more rating services in the market and they are all avail- 
able to this salesman, I think he ought to explain any 
wide points of variation in the rating service to the buyer 
in order that he or she may be fully informed about the 
existence of the rating services and their variations in 
that market. 

Q. Should timebuyers call a station direct without tell- 
ing the salesman beforehand? 

A. (From Ruth Jones) I said that I think a salesman 

owes a timebuyer the courtesy of telling the timebuyer 

first what he is going to say before he goes to a client. 

PAGE 22 By the same token, the salesman is entitled to the same 



courtesy. I am sure that there are many times when a 
salesman doesn't mind if we call direct. Sometimes we 
can accomplish a job because we have known the manager 
a long time or because there are other deals that are in 
the works. But don't embarrass the salesman by calling 
the station without telling him first. It has to work the 
same way as our request not to go to the client first. 

Q. Salesmen also sell ideas. A salesman may have a sales 
approach or a merchandising idea that might change the 
client's buying plans. What does the timebuyer do to pass 
this on? 

A. (From Ruth Jones) I guess the candid answer is half 
the time they don't do anything, because, unfortunately, 
very often by the time the merchandising plan has come 
through, the buying has been done and the timebuyer isn't 
going to bother to change everything around. 

I will say this though, that if there is an unusual mer- 
chandising plan or a promotion plan and that is subject 
to the buyer's own discrimination, he generally will send 
it down to the account executive or out to the client with 
a note on it. Incidentally, it is rarely true that a mer- 
chandising plan will change a client's plan, because when 
you come down to it, except in very few instances, we are 
not in the business of buying merchandising; we are in 
the business of buying circulation. Merchandising is really 
an appendage rather than the basic effort, and therefore 
should not be the basis for our day-by-day buying. If we 
wanted to buy merchandising, we would be buying some- 
thing entirely different. 

Q. Lew, what makes a time salesman really tick? 
A. (From Lew Avery) Probably what makes him tick 
most is that he is that type of aggressive indivdual who 
derives a real pleasure from the consummation of a sale. 
I think it is somewhat the same characteristic that a 
fighter pilot possesses, judging by a report I recently read 
on psychological tests on a most successful fighter pilot. 

Q. What do you consider reasonable separation between 
competing accounts; also, would you rather do business 
over the phone or in person? 

A. (From Ruth Jones) The answer to the last one is 
that depends on the salesman. 

The question about the separation between competitive 
accounts, that is an impossible one for me to answer, par- 
ticularly when you stop to consider the way Procter & 
Gamble buys time and splits up their shows, and may 
have a similar copy approach right in the same show. 

I would say what we try to do, on buying spots, is to 
stay about an hour apart from any competitive product. 
But, if you are buying participating spots and have a local 
personality, he should never sell any products that are 
competitive. Insofar as spots between programs, if you can 
get a better spot by being a half hour away from a 
competitor, you might just as well go and buy it. * * * 



Seminar 



8. 



HOW NETWORKS WORK AND HOW TO BUY 

Speakers: John Karol. vice president in charge of network 
sales, CBS; Jim Luce, head timebuyer, J. Walter Thomp- 
son. Moderator was Thomas McDermott, v. p., radio-tv, 
N. W. Ayer. Historical background from McDermott follows: 

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

TOM McDERMOTT: Broadcasting, as we know it, is com- 
monly conceded to have started in 1920 when the first 
pre-scheduled broadcast took place on November 2. That 
was an election-return broadcast. Obviously it was a sus- 




firrr's been mighty uppity tinee h<- u<>t the job. 



11 JULY 1955 



255 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



tainer. But good old American free enterprise soon started 
to work and not quite two years later on 28 August 1922 
the first sponsored broadcast took place. The advertiser 
was the Queensborough Corp. and the particular air at 
the time belonged to WEAF, then owned by AT&T. 

One more significant date was 4 December 1923. Now, 
despite rumor to the contrary, this is not exactly the date 
when Frank Silvernail (BBDO) began to buy time. That 
occurred about four or five days later. But on 4 December 
1923, the first national advertiser used the airways. The 
advertiser was National Carbon Co., again on WEAF. 

These were examples of spot radio which is how broad- 
casting began. But again free enterprise started to work 
and in a very short time a very important change had 
taken place. Advertisers who were then on the air, al- 
though few in number, began to feel its effect and began 
to seek a wider circle of listeners. 

The AT&T, too, had a stake in this new medium, be- 
cause they had a network of wire stretching out all across 
the country and obviously they were able to accommodate 
more messages on those wires. 

The solution was obvious and on February 22, 1924, just 
a couple of months later, the first network broadcast 
occurred, and it was our old friend, the National Carbon 
Co. with the Everready Hour. 

Thus network broadcasting started, and now to cover 
how networks work, here is John Karol. 



HOW NETWORKS WORK 

JOHN KAROL: Network radio grew out 
of a combination of stations, originally 
by the National Broadcasting Co. Of 
course the networks don't own all the 
stations. They are limited by FCC 
ruling to ownership of no more than 
seven stations in radio. They can also 
own seven in the case of television, five 
vhf and two additional uhf. 
As you know the networks are mainly 
joined together in the case of radio (and I will refer to 
radio very specifically for the moment) by telephone lines 
and the stations are affiliated with networks by contracts. 
The rate of payment between the networks and the indi- 
vidual stations varies. 

There is a separation, as you know, today between radio 
and television, at least in our network, and I think it is 
true elsewhere, because we look on them as separate and 
distinct media. I am sure all of you know that the radio 
audience — and now the television audience too — has prob- 
ably been measured more than any other advertising 
medium since its very inception. Advertisers were not 
satisfied to know the gross dimensions of radio; that is, not 
satisfied with just how many homes were equipped with 
radio but they wanted to know how many were listening 
at the particular time the program was on over the par- 
ticular combination of stations that the advertiser might 
be using, and even more specifically how many could 
identify the sponsor. 

So radio has been a very well and much-measured 
medium. I don't know how much longer we can stand, of 
course, for the kind of inadequate measures that we have 
been getting in radio. Unfortunately, in the early days 
of radio, I think, we were blessed with the same kind of 
exaggerated measurements that television seems to be 
getting today. 

I don't want to get competitive, but, actually, the fact 
remains that in the case of radio now we are being short- 
changed considerably. We are getting the measurement 
primarily, of the living room set although we are now 
getting some indication of listening in car radios. But 
how long it will be before we can measure listening to 
such radio sets as the little transistor set that you can 
carry in your pocket — and other portable sets — I really 
PAGE 23 can't say. 








I am sure that you timebuyers and media people are 
already aware of some of these problems. Someone once 
said that sometimes things go from bad to worse and then 
they come back to bad again. That might be what hap- 
pended to us. Someone commented on the fact that net- 
work radio grew out of spot radio, and now we find that 
spot radio is in the ascendency again, and we have to 
adapt ourselves to these changing conditions. This may be 
difficult but certainly not impossible since many other busi- 
nesses have had to do the same and sometimes came out 
of the adjustment stronger than before. It is in this 
process of adaptation that we become stronger, and if we 
are going to survive, we have got to adapt. (Later in the 
seminar Mr. Karol discusses network sales.) 



HOW NETWORKS ARE BOUGHT 

JIM LUCE: This short talk can't cover 
all the ramifications of anything as im- 
portant as purchasing a network pro- 
gram. Actually, of course, many of the 
advertising considerations used in the 
purchase of spot apply also in network. 
The research tools are about the same 
and the major difference is in the 
method of application. However, before 
considering these, I would like to dis- 
cuss the timebuyer's responsibility in relation to network 
because I feel a person new in the field of timebuying 
might feel that his only function is to follow through on 
all of the detail involved after a purchase has been made. 
Moreover, many timebuyers are apt to feel that when a 
network decision is pending they are almost completely 
cut out and can do nothing constructive because no one 
is going to ask their opinion. 

I think it fair to say that the purchase of network im- 
mediately involves more action on the part of both agency 
and advertiser management than is true in spot. This does 
not mean that these managements are not extremely 
active when a decision is made to allocate budgets for 
spot but once this has been done they count on the time- 
buyer very heavily to make the actual buys. Since both 
the allocation of the budget and the actual purchase is 
almost simultaneous in the case of network, management 
might seem more concerned over network. Also, in net- 
work the advertising is going to receive much more pub- 
licity than national spot decisions in individual markets 
and will immediately be compared with the performance 
of other network advertisers. It will be measured by net- 
work program rating services and these ratings will be 
published in broadcast and advertising trade papers much 
more so than anything done on a spot basis. 

Within these agencies, television and radio directors and 
their script writers, producers, directors, etc., may come 
into play if the program is agency produced and there 
will be many meetings on this which a timebuyer need 
not really attend. Another fact of life that the timebuyer 
has to learn is that if the advertiser involved is a very 
large one with other network programs being broadcast, 
this advertiser might be able to obtain a piece of time not 
believed available. The appropriation in the case of tele- 
vision will probably be anywhere from two to five million 
dollars and it is only right that the agency put only their 
most influential people into the negotiation and I don't 
think any timebuyers have to apologize for the fact that 
we recognize that the head of a radio and television de- 
partment or an account representative with many years 
of experience might have an ability to negotiate with 
more authority and perhaps at a higher level than the 
timebuyer. 

What then can the timebuyer do in the case of net- 
work? I think I can best recite an actual example which 
occurred recently. We had an advertiser using television 
announcements in a number of markets and they had 
indicated interest in network if and when the right vehicle 
became available. One of our timebuyers who does a good 






The South-Problem or 




15 \ John IVj>|M'i- anil lt<»rt I i i^iison 




V-^ 



1 



*£ MSm 




Does il actuall) <<>-t you mure tu uct 
-.ill-- ill the South? Is it realb a diffi- 
cult area for your sales organization? 
Then- i- it possible thai you ma] have 
been missing the ke] to tin- whole 
problem? 

There"- good reason for sa\ ing the 
South is different YouTl see it in the 
ua\ people walk along the street. The 
ua\ thej catch a bus, talk things over 
during a coffee break, gel a day's work 
done in the office. The «a\ the] offer 
to serve you in the stoic-. \nd: the 
way they buy. 

Decisive element: \H the things 
people live with in a place will make 
it different — things like weather, in- 
come, density of population, qualit] of 
leadership, a changing economy. 

Rut there's one important factor — - 
perhaps the most important of all to 
men who think of the South in terms 
of sales which until just recentl] has 
been overlooked. This factor is the 
size and power of the !\egro market. 
1 "ii take a market the size of Mem- 
phis, for instance. The Memphis area 

is forty percent Negro. Not mam 
people stopped to think of that when 
they got read] to break into the Mem- 
phi- market. 

This group had never been directl] 
reached until our radio station WDI \ 
became the fir.-t to program exclusivel] 
for them. It wasn't long before we 
were impelled to rail this market the 
"Golden Market. ' Here is why this de- 



Bcription is more true than ever right 

now . 

In the in -t |ila. r. there are in the 
\\DI\ coverage area 1.2.S0.721 Ne 
groes. I hat i- more than there are in 
Chicago, />///n I.o- Vngeles, plus Cleve- 

l.iinl. In thi- one area are < on. -nitrated 

alnio-t ten percent of the entire V< 
population of the I nited States! 
Second, thi- "Golden Market" i- ab- 

Solutel] dominated b] \\ Dl \. \\ Dl \ 

i- tlie onlj 50,000-watl radio station in 
Memphis, the area"- hub and metrop- 
olis. It jumped to 50,000 from 250 
Watts in JUSI one mo\ e. 

\\ Dl \ i- regarded by the Negro lis- 
teners as their own station. \- In as 
moat of them are concerned it'- the 
only station. It uses onl\ Negro \oi< .•- 
and Negro music. You turn the dial 
jn-t once — and you'll know when you've 
got WDIA. It has a language and a 
Savor these listeners know, enjoj and 
respond to. They take pride in it. 

Still another result of this devotion is 
that WDIA has shot straight to the top 
of both Hooper and Pulse ratings dav 
and night. And it has stayed there t\\e 
straight years. For these listeners -ta\ 
put. 

The,, spend 80%: And there's still 
another consideration that counts hea\ i- 
l] for WDI \. That's the fact that when 
you present your sales message to these 
people, you're singling oul a -roup that 
b] actual record spends eight] percent 
of their income. \nd lhe\ 'II earn a ipiai - 
ter billion dollars in L955. 

Look at that 10 percent of the Mem- 
phis trade area. That 40 pen cut bu\- 
more than you'd think it would. It 

buys ">(>.!! percent of the -alt. W.6 per- 
cent ol the women- dresses. 53.4 per- 
cent of the hosiery. 00 percent of the 
deodorants. 64.8 percent of the t 1 

Nor i- this low-income buying, 
either: these folks buy national brands 
and qualit] items like other folk- onlj 
more of them. They have special rea- 
sons for doing this na\. Habil and 



the ' in umataru ea from which I 

- I he • 
of then social activities it home 
example, and therefore buying all the 
i omforts the] can foi the i I 
• omparativel] large size ol thi i fami- 
lies, and thm .lib , tion for them. I he 
willingness to enjo] and make the most 
ol the present, m hen the Future ma] be 
problematii al. I hese are Bome "f them. 

Bei an-.- we ve had the • ustomei - and 
the medium, we've been able to see the 
healths db . t- ,,f \\ Dl V- in | 
lot ol advertisers. \\ e've got srn 
stoi ies aplent] .it \\ Dl \. m< luding 
those ol 

Colgate Dental (renin, f><><f<;<* 

lii(oinooif<>.v. I ttlue r's € 'offe<*. 

Ftvtvhvr's Cmttmrtm, mm i «>/»i 

Remedy. Carter's little liver 

I'Uls. Cmmtimemtmi Trmttufmut, 

Cheer. 

I hat - a few of them there are main 
more. 

I>ut the important thing i- t" give 
you a clear idea of what results this 
combination of market, medium and 
approai h i an deliver, for the part* - 
ular products that interest you a 

\\ e believe w c i ail do that. 

Ml that's Decessax] i- foi j on to drop 

u- a note hen- at WDM OH J our lettei - 

head, indicating the kind "I" prodi* t 
J "ii \e got in mind. I .< a\ e it up ! 
to gel the proof of performance into 
\ "iir hand- promptl] . I bei - - 
first i ate la. tual data on bow W Dl \ - 
powerful advantages can turn your 
problem- into profits. It's yours il * "U 
want it. 

\\ Dl \ i- represented nationally 1>\ 
the John I . Pearson ( ompany. 

IohxTeppbr, 




■ 1 1 



BERT tH -H" 



HiRet/n II -vmtreial Managrr 



11 JULY 1955 



257 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



job in keeping abreast of network changes and maintain- 
ing contact with network sales personnel learned that a 
certain program might open up. This information was 
transmitted to the television director and the account 
representative along with some good reasons and some 
fairly simple research that did not take much time to pull 
together as to why this might be what we needed. 

When the client presentation was ready, it was delivered 
to the timebuyer to check and several very good points 
were added at the timebuyer's suggestion. Most of these 
suggestions I think anyone here might have made, but 
at a moment like that account representatives are apt to 
be pretty nervous and accept any suggestions with welcome 
arms. 

The purchase of both radio and television networks 
today is just about as interesting as at any time in broad- 
cast history. In the case of television two networks are 
still in an extremely dominant position and the ability to 
negotiate time and decide which of the sales formats 
available to use is most important. For example, what 
about alternate vs. regular-week sponsorship; a participa- 
tion in a network program vs. full sponsorship; day vs. 
evening. The interpretation of these new sales formats 
to the advertising problem involved certainly offers a 
timebuyer a great opportunity in analyzing any network 
purchase being considered. In addition, the timebuyer 
can interpret such important things as discounts on one 
network vs. another if that network is already being used; 
possibility of station clearance; desirability of present sta- 
tion line-ups and what improvements might be made; 
interpretation of research services available as regards 
such things as audience composition, history of other pro- 
grams in the time, what the competition is doing. Actually, 
few people within the agency are in as desirable a spot 
as the timebuyer to answer many of the questions which 
inevitably arise during a network purchase. The thing 
he must guard against is < 1 ) feeling that the entire nego- 
tiation should be handled by himself alone and (2) acting 
hurt because he personally didn't make the phone call to 
the network sales executives. 

John Karol, in a speech some time back, made a state- 
ment to the effect that radio network is now out of agency- 
advertiser-program departments and into where it be- 
longed, namely, the media department. To an extent this 
is true in that the limelight of publicity now is more apt 
to fall on the Dragnet's, the Lucy's, and the spectaculars 
rather than the fact that Amos 'n Andy is on network 
radio five nights a week. Many times today network radio 
costs are very similar to spot radio budgets and I often- 
times think that as timebuyers we are too slow to reevalu- 
ate one in light of what could be done in the other. Of 
course, this is a two-way street and a network radio user 
should always be alert to what might be done for the 
same amount of money in spot. I am not making a plea 
for either but only saying that the timebuyer should peri- 
odically make such a review. Actually, it is his responsi- 
bility to do so but in the hustle-bustle of every day it is 
one of those easy things to put off doing. If it is done, I 
can assure you that a head timebuyer or account group 
will be very glad to have it done and I am sure will com- 
mend you for seeing that it is done. 

As we all know, timebuyers are apt to spend more hours 
seeing and talking with individual stations and their rep- 
resentatives than with network sales personnel. And some- 
times when a spot budget is put into network either par- 
tially or entirely the buyer feels he has personally let 
down his friends. This is an attitude to shed just as 
quickly as possible. We must all strive to be advertising 
people but I can still remember one of the first meetings 
I was in when a decision was made to cancel radio and 
put the budget into newspapers. As I recall, there were 
excellent reasons why this should be done but at the 
time I felt I would never be able to show my face again. 

TOM McDERMOTT. In preparing this topic, the speakere 
PAGE 24 felt that the sales patterns of television were fairly well 



known to most of us, and they also felt at the same time 
that radio has such a different face for most of us that 
they wanted to discuss in some detail not the past of net- 
work radio but what network radio is now and what it is 
going to be, and John Karol is going to do just that. 

JOHN KAROL: The observations of Jim Luce, I think, are 
particularly pertinent. It is true that in the early days 
of network radio, it was so often the front office that was 
important — the wife of the president became an important 
person in deciding what kind of program would be used, 
and the one-man survey was really in the forefront in 
the early days of network radio. So often the president of 
the agency would deal directly with the head of the client 
organization in deciding on network radio, and to that 
extent the timebuyer was left out of the picture, excepting 
in so far as he had to pick up the pieces and send out the 
order and make sure that the contract was correct. 

Now network radio has perhaps fallen from grace or 
fashion and been replaced in that rather unique glamor 
role by another medium, television, and when we go into 
the average advertising agency the first talk is about tele- 
vision and not about radio. I would say that I think net- 
work radio has returned to the media department. This 
Is fortunate from our standpoint, because network radio — 
radio generally I think — is one of the few media to adapt 
itself to its audience; that is to say, we have reduced our 
costs to conform with the audiences delivered, and very 
few advertising media can make that statement. 

There are many cases, as you well know, when maga- 
zines would increase rates simply due to the increased 
cost of operation. Radio did try to adapt itself, and is 
still doing so, as you well know. The rate card today 
doesn't look anything like it did 10 years ago. Daytime 
rates are holding up well, but nighttime rates are down. 

I say we are glad to be back in the media departments 
because we feel on a straight cost comparison of radio 
with other advertising media, that radio still shows very 
favorable odds. I think that is important for you to ob- 
serve, because I believe the same pattern will eventually 
take place with all other advertising media. Sooner or 
later they will have to turn to the media experts. Sooner 
or later media have to be analyzed. Sooner or later the 
glamor begins to wear off and the advertiser says, "How 
much does it cost and how does it compare with other 
ways in which I might spend my money." 

Naturally we feel that radio as an advertising medium 
is going to play a very important role in the expanding 
U. S. economy and we think radio is very much here to 
stay. A couple of agencies have recently viewed network 
radio as an advertising medium as if it was just discovered 
today. There are 111 million different places where radio 
can be heard and this makes it a great advertising me- 
dium. But you can't view radio this way alone because it 
does have a past. 

I think it is worth pointing out again that radio has at- 
tempted to adjust its costs to its changing audiences. For 
example, in 1948 when nighttime network radio was very 
fashionable and everybody wanted it, the average evening 
half-hour program cost about $19,000, time and talent, 
and delivered in the neighborhood of 4,800,000 homes — 
with three minutes of commercial. This, according to 
Nielsen Radio Index. 

Today it is true that the audiences have gone down, 
but costs have also gone down. The audience has gone 
down from an average of around 4,800,000 to about 2,500,- 
000 homes for the average half-hour program. The costs 
have gone down in proportion. 

We are changing our nighttime program structure based 
on what we have learned from our past. One of those 
things we see is that daytime radio is still very successful 
with the five-time-a-week pattern, Monday through Fri- 
day. The programs are just about the same now as they 




■» w 



^■Vk.^i..'/ 



Facts and Figures on WIBW-TV's Market 
That You Won't Find Elsewhere!* 

jffi Consumer spendable income- $2.8 billion. CSI per household |5,726 rotal 
retail sales — $1.85 billion. T ,^^ TV homes- 149,358. Retail sales pei house hold — 
$3,755. Food sales — $376 million. f^fg Drug sales ^7 , | million. Gen. mer. n _'77 
million. C^> ^ Eat & drink — SI 15 million. Apparel store sales — $94 million. Home 
linn, sales— $88 million, jm Filling station salts — $120 million. Automotive store sales 
— $364 million. Building material, hdwe. sales — S154 million. J£*j^ Gross hum in- 
come — $385 million. Cross income per hum — $7,192. ^" Farm Livestock income — 
$238 million. Crops income — $123 million. Total Farms- 53,605. 

WIBW-TV IS thi: ViUA I HIRED station for 
NEWS -SPORTS -WEATHER- FARM SERVICE! 



News, Sports, Weather, Faun service — the 
TopekAREA Audience prefers to view them on 
WIBW- 1 \ ' This was proved b) the Whan I V 
Stud) of the TopekAREA — a personalized depth 
study oi the viewing habits ol this region, made 
during fan.-Feb. 1955 1>\ F. L. Whan ol Kansas 
State College. A her copy ol this valuable surve) 



with all Luts and figures is waiting foi you. Call 

youi (.a|>|u i man oi lnpi ka. 

rhroughout the small towns and farms thai i 

up Topek \RI V, WIBW rv is the first viei 

choice! (Whan Study) We now delivei 156,1 

homes . - saturation . . . in a $1, 100,000,000 

market. 




'Consumer Markets — 

a i ... i'\. lading u rl>:n 



CBS 

DU MONT 

ABC 



TOPEKA, KANSAS 

Ben Ludy, Gen. Mgr. 

WIBW & WIBW-TV In Topeko 

KCKN in Kansas City 



Th« Kansas View Fbmt 



11 JULY 1955 



259 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 






were 10 or 15 years ago and daytime radio has held up 
very well. 

If we program our nighttime like the daytime, we think 
it will make it easier for the listener to tune in radio. 
Take the Amos 'n Andy Music Hall program, Monday 
through Friday, for example. If an advertiser right now 
comes in and buys five periods of that throughout the 
week, he can buy that for $15,000, and during a single 
week he reaches over five million different homes com- 
pared with the four million for $19,000 that I spoke of in 
1948. And he gets five minutes of commercial. Because 
he reaches some of those homes more than once because 
the program is on five times a week, during the course of 
the week the advertiser makes impressions in over 9 mil- 
lion homes. In other words more homes reached with 
more commercial time for less money now than in 1948. 

That is just one little example of what I am talking 
about, and I use it only to illustrate the point which I 
am trying to make — that you have to analyze, you have 
got to study all the values that are available today. 

We are just beginning to do that in some media. I 
think we can learn a lot from studying the past, present 
and particularly the future of this medium, network radio. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Q. What gives a network tv program more impact than 
a tv announcement? Was this your client alone who felt 
this way? (Asked of Jim Luce) 

A. 'From Jim Luce) We have yards of comparisons back 
in the office on network vs. spot. It actually is a question 
of weights. By the time you compare network and spot, 
almost all the advantages are on the side of spot. It is 
more flexible. You can place shorter-term contracts. I 
think a lot of it depends on the weights given, and one of 
the important weights in network is this thing which we 
might call prestige and importance. In the particular in- 
stance I was thinking of, it was felt quite important that 
the prestige factor, the merchandising value of a program, 
the greater ability to work within the commercial format 
within the allotted period of three minutes or six minutes 
depending upon the amount of network time — did out- 
weigh the value of the spot announcements that we were 
using. The announcements, we felt, had done a splendid 
job, but in this case the program — there is no doubt 
about it — does have an impact which you just don't get 
with announcements. Not that they haven't done a superb 
job and will continue to do so, but they are not as identi- 
fied. Sometimes the importance of that can depend on 
the advertiser and the job to be done. 

TOM McDERMOTT: Do you have anything to add, John, 
on the comparison between network and spot? 
JOHN KAROL: Network radio has changed a great deal 
so that now there are more opportunities for timebuyers 
to use network radio. It is now possible to make a net- 
work operation closely parallel a spot operation. In short, 
here again is the challenge to examine the availabilities. 

Q. How best can radio change the buying of time from 
the basis of listenership to the basis of circulation? In 
other words, instead of selling quarter-hour ratings, how 
about selling weekly audiences? 

A. 'From John Karol) That is one of the things that 
just comes from a process of education. I think that 
when we get a five-time-a-week pattern, such as I have 
talked about in nighttime, and such as we have had in 
daytime radio since radio networks' very inception, you 
do have a different kind of audience than a daily audience. 
For example, in the old days when Procter & Gamble was 
among the earliest users of daytime radio, lots of people 
thought they were silly to spend their money that way. 
A typical network rating was 3 in the daytime but its 
weekly rating was not 3. Somewhere between 3 and 15 
is the true audience of the five-time a week show. Actually 
its average weekly audience is about five times the daily 
PAGE 25 audience in terms of different homes reached. 



JIM LUCE: When you take the quarter-hour ratings and 
what you pay, it looks like a silly buy. Yet there is an 
impact with the identification that may be the deciding 
factor in the sale. So I think it is all part of our respon- 
sibility to know how to interpret these figures to the 
people we work with, and not let them grasp the easiest 
thing — the end figures. They want only end figures. Our 
job is to find out how these figures should be interpreted. 

Q. Are cost-per- 1,000 comparisons generally made be- 
tween network and spot? If so, how? 
A. <From Jim Luce) I think I can promise you that 
cost-per- 1,000 comparisons are made between network and 
spot and they are not easy to handle. I was making one 
just the other day between a quarter-hour network pro- 
gram and some local programs we had on for a client, 
and in some markets he used announcements and in some 
he used five-minute weather, in other places a quarter- 
hour news program twice a week, and the cost-per- 1.000 
needed quite an amount of interpretation. We tried to 
bring it down to cost-per-commercial-minute, which we 
felt was a move in the right direction. Of course, the 
announcements won hands down on any cost-per- 1.000, as 
they always do. 

TOM McDERMOTT: Maybe I can add a little to it. I 
think in most cases that the decision as to whether to 
buy network or spot is usually made before you look at 
cost-per- 1,000 figures. The decision isn't going to rest on 
whether or not a schedule of spot delivers a better cost- 
per- 1,000 than a network buy. Probably the best reason 
for that is that there is usually no standard of compari- 
son, except if you have a prearranged schedule of spots, 
and have Nielsen make a special run of his cards. 

Q. Could you compare an individual market and come 
out with anything? Say, for instance, your cost-per- 
commercial-minute on a network program in Jacksonville, 
Fla., as compared with a minute spot evening time; would 
you come out with anything valid in that? 
A. (From Tom McDermott) I think you'd come out with 
several items of information, and it depends on what you 
wanted to do with them, because, again, you usually are 
comparing things that you don't have the opportunity of 
buying competitively. In other words, if you are looking 
at the Bing Crosby show in Miami, vs. a schedule of an- 
nouncements in Miami, you can get a measure of com- 
parative performance there using local rating services. 

Q. Would it give you any kind of an answer as far as 
buying a particular station or network is concerned? 
A. (From Tom McDermott) If we are buying Bing Crosby 
for a motor car manufacturer and we're trying to show 
the local dealer committee how smart a buy was made. I 
think we would have some numbers to show them. It 
depends on what we want to do with those numbers. 

Q. Do you think network radio must compete more 
directly with spot in order to forge ahead? What advan- 
tage does network offer over spot? 

A. (From John Karol) Yes, I think that network radio 
and spot are more competitive in going after the same 
kind of business, and yet by the same token they are 
more alert because we have joined forces to sell radio as 
a medium. 

When you have a national program, you do have a 
period of time that you can call your own. It has promo- 
tion and and merchandising values. It has good-will value. 

We have learned from the development of television to 
adapt ourselves still further in network radio. By that I 
mean this, that television has because of its high cost 
made it necessary for many advertisers to share programs 
or to buy what amounts to spots in network television 
shows. You are familiar with the several advertisers in 
the so-called spectaculars, because very few advertisers 
could afford to sponsor the whole program. We are adapt- 
ing the same kind of technique to radio. There are ad- 



THE STEERE STATIONS 




• When the Steere Stations' representative calls on yon, here 
are some basic facts yon onghl to ku.m abonl these two nch 
regional markets : 



WMAK, Nashville 56th U.S. 
city. WMAK, 5,000 watts lull 
'line at 1300 kc, BOTera 1,385,000 
population area with $924,427,000 
total retail Bales. The Mid s,,uth - s 
powerful MUSIC, NKWSand 
SPOBTS Nation. 



WKMI, Kalamazoo-Battlc Creek 

combined met) 

; population, 76th 

in i'.s. The WKMI signal 

1,719,000 population . . 

billion retail sales. 

k<\ . . . Western Mich g 

powerful iii'l 



/; t i overage FoI«< . . - Ba S 
D 

STEERE BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



KALAMAZOO, MICHIGAN 



s 
p 


R 
T 
S 



* 



Afe 



261 



11 JULY 1955 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



vertisers who share network programs. There are adver- 
tisers who buy segments of programs in which you are 
entitled to a minute of commercial time. 

To answer your question, network radio may very well 
be getting closer to a spot than it was before. 

Q. How many networks can the United States really 
support in radio, in television? 

A. <From Tom McDermott) From my viewpoint — and 
this may sound like a silly answer, but I don't mean it to 
be that way — there will be as many radio and tv networks 
as American advertisers find it profitable to support. We 
tend to think of major networks but a lot of us buyers 
are acutely aware of the fact that there is a Collegiate 
Radio Network and the Keystone Network and there are 
several operations of stations that are organized in net- 
work fashion to deliver service and as long as advertisers 
find that that kind of operation produces for them effi- 
ciently those networks will remain in effect. I don't think 
anybody can say there will be one network or three or 
how many. 

Q. What are the requirements of a station to become 
basically interconnected on a network; what are the re- 
quirements for other classifications? 

A. (From John Karol) I suppose that means tv, but 
basically it is the same thing in radio as in tv. The size of 
market determines that. The radio network was set up 
for covering broadly the northeastern half of the U. S.. 
and most basic network cities are of 100,000 population 
or more. 

Q. How important are regional networks, like Yankee, 
Don Lee? 

A. (From Jim Luce) I think it depends on the problem. 
If you get an advertiser, and he is in New England only, 
or he wants to use New England, I think all you can do 
is compare Yankee vs. programs available on each vs. the 
market that you want to cover. Maybe you just want to 
cover Boston. There is no pat answer to it, but certainly 
regionals have filled a very valuable need, more so in 
some areas than in others, because in certain other areas 
where there are regionals they are not as identifiable. 
They are just combination discount, that is all they 
are. I don't think they serve much purpose beyond that, 
but we love them because we like to save money. If we 
can save money, we may use them where appropriate. * * * 



Seminar 7. 

CAN YOU DO BETTER WITH SPOT? 

Speakers: Kevin Sweeney, president, Radio Advertising 
Bureau; Ned Midgely, media supervisor, Ted Bates. Mod- 
erator was Frank Pellegrin, v. p., H-R Representatives. 

WHY YOU DO BETTER WITH SPOT RADIO 

KEVIN SWEENEY: Let me define the 
sidelines I am going to run down. Some 
of what I say that spot radio can do 
probably applies to spot television, but 
I am going to talk only about spot ra- 
dio, and why it is better than any other 
advertising media you can buy when 
you are buying markets selectively. 

Weather, local competition, distribu- 
tion, local folkways, legislation, per- 
capita income, these and a dozen other factors materially 
affecting sales must also affect advertising. I hesitate to 
even cite examples of why you may have to advertise 
PAGE 26 selectively, except that some of us came directly from 




Princeton or Stephens without ever seeing the outside 
world in which the following can occur: 

1. You have a grocery specialty which is a sensation 
except in a market where A & P and Kroger have all the 
grocery business, and the buyers of those chains are 
singularly unimpressed by your claims. Result: no distri- 
bution. Sometimes it is better to go around a market like 
that until they, too, see the vision. 

2. Your product's sales curve follows temperature. When 
it is hot or cold or even wet, things happen to your product. 
Well, obviously, if it is 70 degrees in one market and 10 
degrees in another, there will be different sales potentials 
and different advertising may be indicated. 

3. In several major markets you run into entrenched 
local competition — the silly jerks prefer the product their 
papa bought for 80 years. Sometimes it takes time to dig 
them out, depending on the bravado of the client, it may 
indicate far heavier expenditures than normal or none. 
Obviously, a medium with a national pattern is not 
indicated there. 

These are the kinds of problems where selective market- 
ing is sometimes indicated, and when it is indicated you 
can do the advertising job better — better than any other 
medium with spot radio. 

Here are the reasons why. 

First of all — and in most of these cases I will eliminate 
the basic advantages which I feel that radio has and con- 
centrate on the selective marketing aspect of this story — 
spot trades on one of radio's basic advantages when com- 
pared with other selective advertising tools in that it 
reaches all the people. The purchasing power now lies 
with all the people, 100% of the families. With spot you 
can talk to all of them because radio is the only medium 
that gives you access to them. And most important when 
you are weighing the major selective media, the only me- 
dium that gets you out into the suburbs, the whole vast 
complex of cities, small towns, and rural areas that sur- 
round the great markets of America. You reach out there 
easily with metropolitan radio stations with the same 
force and vigor. With other selective media, your penetra- 
tion, coverage or whatever you dub it falls to a half, a 
third, a sixth even of what you get in the city. 

Second, spot radio allows you to engineer an advertising 
budget if you are going to relate it to sales, because it 
provides multiple choice of facilities. In markets like 
Kansas City, Oklahoma City, Toledo, Akron, and to a 
lesser degree, in hundreds of other areas, there is far less 
opportunity to make sales potential and advertising budget 
mesh in an estimate because in other media there is such 
limited access to facilities — which in English means 
there is only one newspaper. Maybe you can afford to 
spend only $5,000 in the market, but there is no way of 
buying what you need in these markets except through 
radio for less than double that amount. 

Third, advertising is becoming a more exact science — 
or at least we are trying. And the old shotgun technique 
of advertising at the whole market is giving way to reach- 
ing the right people within a market. If your product is 
beer, it's men you want. They select the brand. If it is 
such a product that hides skin blemishes, it is girls and 
women 12 to 35. (After that they have either captured 
a guy or to hell with it.) 

So when you advertise in St. Louis or Dallas or Houston 
or Minneapolis, it is not the concept of advertising to the 
entire market. That went out with button shoes. It is the 
idea of advertising to the people within the market who 
will respond frequently enough to make your advertising 
profitable. 

Now, radio's wealth of facilities — its terrific smorgasbord 
of programing — enables you to single out in each of these 
markets just the group that you want, and while it would 
be pretty expansive of me to say there is no waste, there is 
less than in any other selective medium by far. 

Fourth there is no question that in many cities it is 
important to localize your message. Any type of radio 
provides you with localization equal to that provided by 




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11 JULY 1955 



263 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



the best of other so-called purely local media — network 
programs are released over local facilities. When you want 
to really localize though, it is spot radio that gives you 
that wealth of long-established local personalities who can 
slant your product message today in a way to meet local 
competition; or take advantage of local weather condi- 
tions; or just use local jargon to give the product that 
extra push. Most important, to give your product that 
benediction that they — who come into a home 250 times 
or more a year — can provide. 

Fifth, one of the most important concepts in all adver- 
tising is to insert your product in the right framework. 
It will one day be automatic — if I may venture a prophecy 
—a great deal of advertising will be run only in those 
media that relate to the general field of the item, and at 
those times when the product is being used or considered 
for use. 

Obviously, in the latter area spot radio is six feet tall 
and everyone else is a pygmy. You can reach the man in 
his automobile for your tire, motor oil, or gasoline message. 
You can reach women in the kitchen as they are actually 
preparing food or eating. You can time your message's 
arrival better with spot radio than with any other medium. 

I can tick off some other advantages: 

The one of getting your message in just before the 
woman goes to the store is a clear advantage to spot. 

The one of building up the really huge circulation you 
need to influence people in these days when someone 
politely yawns after you announce you told half of all 
Americans about the advantage of that sensational new 
product Boozits. With spot you can tell half of all the 
people in a city your message in 36 hours with only 20 
announcements. 

Another advantage is the far lower cost of spot than 
comparable selective media; one-fourth and one-fifth the 
cost-per- 1,000 of newspapers. 

The advantage of out-selling other media, actually 
bringing people into stores in greater numbers and extract- 
ing more dollars from them despite great rate advantages 
to the competition. 

I see three significant trends — I don't know whether 
they are short or long-term — that are building in national 
spot. Two of them will make spot radio more productive, 
one will complicate your life. 

First is saturation as a standard national advertiser tool. 
For a half dozen years the concept of a great many 
announcements poured into a relatively short period has 
been growing. During the 40 's a few advertisers would 
use more than one strip of five announcements per week 
but they were very few. Now that pattern is slowly being 
erased, although it will always be an important one. 

Now the concept of 40, 100 or even 800 announcements 
per week for relatively short times is growing more and 
more important and justly so, because it capitalizes on 
one of radio's great advantages — the ability to reach all 
the people repetitively for low cost. I think the next five 
years will see dozens of advertisers using radio almost 
exclusively that way. 

Second, I detect a growing willingness on the part of all 
national advertisers to let local personalities take liberties 
with their sales messages when those liberties mean more 
impact and more sales. The continuing campaign by Life 
in which local radio personalities are allowed complete 
freedom in selecting the features of the magazine they 
wish to promote is the extreme example of this trend to 
allow proven personalities absolute latitude in advertising 
products to the market they have the best grip on. 

Third, the increasing competition of retail advertisers to 
dominate the medium is going to be a harrassing one for 
people buying time. 

Retailers were a negligible source of revenue for radio 
up until six years ago, and it is only in the past year that 
the largest retailers have become convinced that domi- 
nance — saturation — is the method. 

When a single retailer comes in and takes 18,000 an- 
PAGE 27 nouncements annually on only five stations out of those 




available in a market, and when his competitors gobble 
up another 10,000 annually, the competition not only for 
good times but any time is considerably sharpened for 
national advertisers. Especially when these schedules are 
superimposed on local advertisers and retail schedules 
that have been steadily expanding for six years. 

We — the Radio Advertising Bureau — are helping to com- 
plicate this problem because this is the kind of problem 
we enjoy, the problem of the seller's market. Since we, 
like those radio stations who support us, like all money, 
whatever the source, we will be happy to help you cope 
with the problem this poses for the national advertiser. 



THE SPOT TELEVISION STORY 

NED M IDG LEY: It would be very easy 
to start off by saying, "television, too," 
to everything that Kev has said about 
spot radio. They are very similar in a 
number of ways. In their flexibility: 
The same concentration of markets 
exists for television advertising that 
exists for radio advertising. Spot tele- 
vision is available for national adver- 
tisers as a complete national campaign 
or as a supplementary campaign and is available for re- 
gional advertisers. It is the only method in which local 
advertisers can possibly use tv. 

The units of time are the same pretty generally. There 
are exceptions of course. You can't buy football locally 
on television due to some rules of the NCAA in recent 
years. The I.D.'s in television are a new development 
which radio didn't have. I think announcements in radio 
were pretty well confined to one minute and to station 
breaks. Then some person with fiendish glee decided when 
television came along that the station should reap the 
benefit of two announcements at the chain break and 
invented the I.D., to get half again as much for the I.D. 
as he gets for the chain break. 

I like to speculate every once in a while about the five 
minutes around each half-hour, especially in the evening. 
The average television station will conclude, let us say, 
a half-hour evening program somewhere short of five min- 
utes of the hour with a closing announcement. Then they 
will unravel a long line of credits for everyone who had 
anything to do with the production — the producer, the 
director, wardrobe mistress, hats designed by, make-up, 
script writer, assistant script writer, fourth assistant script 
writer, all backed with some very dull music on the 
calliope or something. 

After this reel is unrolled, you get your chain break an- 
nouncement followed quickly by an I.D., followed quickly 
by some identification of the station. It is like Times 
Square in the rush hour when you stop to think about it. 
I say I only speculate on it, because, after all, it is our 
bread and butter, and try and buy an I.D. or a station 
break on any station that is worthwhile. However, there 
is congestion there, and maybe some day with increasing 
competition in the field some of the log jam will be broken. 
One thing that always strikes me very forcibly about 
spot radio or spot television is the concentration that there 
is in the United States; concentration of people, concen- 
tration of buying power, retail sales, gasoline sales, drug, 
food sales. Actually, in 162 markets you can hit 56.7% 
of the total population of the United States. Those mar- 
kets are very clearly defined geographically. 

You don't have to use 162 television stations, nor 162 
radio stations in each of the 162 cities, because you cannot 
build a fence around radio or television signals at the 
city limits. Of course, you have to admit that radio sig- 
nals get out further than television signals, especially at 
night on clear-channel stations, but I think that we are 
underselling spot television coverage. 

For the past four or five years I have marveled each 
time I go through a town called Red Hook, N. Y., which 
is about 86 or 87 miles from New York City, and, practi- 



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11 JULY 1955 



265 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



cally from the time television started, the antennas on 
the houses in this place have increased and increased and 
increased. I don't think in the early days of television, 
at least, that anybody would claim an 87-mile coverage 
for a station in New York. 

The point that comes back on this particular thing is 
that if you go after a concentration of markets and try to 
knock off the big ones through either spot radio or spot 
television, you will be surprised at how few stations you 
can use to do it, because these stations reach out and 
cover other markets that are included in the 162 as well. 
The use of radio or television depends entirely upon 
the job you have to do. There should be no great struggle 
on the part of the media department in any agency to 
come up with an answer to it, and a lot of times the cor- 
rect answer is a combination of the two. Any of you who 
have not been reading recent research on radio will do 
well to review it, because it is showing an amazing vital- 
ity for continued radio listening. 

There are certain suggestions that I would like to make 
to those who buy and to those who sell, especially for those 
people who are relatively new in the business. 

There is no black magic to buying or selling spot radio or 
spot television. It is a business. It is sound. Common 
sense prevails in the long run, and there is no sense in 
tilting at windmills or slanting off at a tangent. It is a 
matter-of-fact, precise business proposition. I think that 
it pays to study the markets, the concentration of popula- 
tions, where the food and drug sales, or whatever cate- 
gories you are interested in, are most highly concentrated. 
It is very important to keep posted on the stations, what 
stations there are in both spot radio and spot television 
that are available in each important market and the job 
they are doing, through their sales promotion. Any sta- 
tion that does not have a definite 52-week campaign of 
sales promotion direct to advertisers and advertising agen- 
cies is missing a bet. 

There are many ways to keep posted. Of course, you 
must follow developments through trade publications, but 
the thing to do is to keep abreast of what is going on as far 
as you can in every important market in the country. You 
should see the station managers when they are in town. 
Get first-hand reports, prejudiced as they will be. Some- 
times you get two sides of the story and you can come up 
with the truth. 

Another thing that is rather important, especially in 
television, is to keep your Standard Rate and Data Service 
up to date on the supplement service, because the rates 
change every time you wink an eye. You don't want to get 
an estimate out to the client and find that the rates have 
increased overnight. 

Familiarity with network schedules is important, because 
when you are buying spot time, most generally, you are 
buying in relation to network programs and ratings, and a 
terribly important thing to learn is to interpret program 
ratings. 

I don't know how to tell you to do it, frankly. There are 
ratings and ratings, and ratings, and you just have to de- 
pend upon your native intelligence to pick out what you 
think is the correct answer. Don't be blinded by a differ- 
ence of .2 per cent in a rating and throw the business to a 
station that is perhaps a bit better on a single availability. 
Once you have evaluated the stations and considered all 
the factors of the particular job to be done, be positive 
about it, say "this is the station that I want in the terri- 
tory and I know the reasons in my mind why I want it." 
I am afraid a lot of timebuyers today try to lay a stack 
of mattresses to fall on in case somebody challenges their 
selection of a station. Once you have made up your mind, 
stick to it and be positive about it. 

As far as the selling end of it is concerned, there are a 
couple of suggestions here which I hope that you sellers 
will take in the spirit in which they are given. 

In calling on agencies and advertisers it is a very smart 

idea to try to make an appointment in advance, to have at 

least one important fact to present. Don't go in just to 

PAGE 28 cover the agency, and be able to turn in a report saying 



you saw Joe Zilch on such and such a day and "nothing 
doing" on that account. Have something important to pre- 
sent. Make your point and be brief. Recognize the pres- 
sure that the buyer or the advertiser is under. 

Sometimes you have to be most understanding, because 
even if you do make an appointment, it is broken by the 
time you get there. That is one of the occupational haz- 
ards of the advertising business. Don't think that the guy 
is trying to give you a run-around. If you are in a rep- 
resentative firm, be sure to expose your station managers 
to as many agencies and advertisers as possible on each 
visit. You don't have to take people out to lunch — but it's 
nice! If out-of-office presentations are made sometimes 
at a luncheon, try to time them accurately so that you 
meet the two p.m. curfew. After two it is an awfully short 
afternoon, and it is better for you and better for the ad- 
vertiser or agency person. 

In the in-the-office presentation, you should call and ask 
for an appointment to set up a meeting of everybody con- 
cerned — account men, buyers — in the conference room. 
Present your story to as large a group as possible to con- 
serve time. 

As far as the actual functioning on availabilities is con- 
cerned, there are improvements necessary there from the 
agency standpoint. I know what you are thinking, you 
sellers. You say that the agencies get availabilities and 
sleep on them for a week or two, and, of course, you must 
expect the station to sell, to get out from under as quickly 
as possible. There is a give and take there which I think 
you can work out with your agency and advertiser con- 
tracts. Try to push availabilities through as quickly as 
possible, train your stations to reply promptly and get the 
whole thing cleaned up and the confirmation out to the 
agency or advertiser in the shortest possible time. 

I don't know how many of you do it — I think some — but 
it is always appreciated if the confirmation not only con- 
firms the time but confirms the exact rate of the service 
that is being bought. 

In conclusion, don't flood the agency with tears if you 
lose an order. You should have sold the station long be- 
fore that particular order was placed. The station is not 
sold when an account is coming up to buy a schedule. If 
you ask the buyer to review the schedule for you for one 
or two or four specific markets, he might have to do the 
same thing for your competitor, and the net result is that 
the whole campaign would be opened up again. The time- 
buyer would have twice the work to do. And you might 
end up losing a few markets that you thought were set. 
Once the decision is reached, start selling for the next 
order, even if it isn't in sight. 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Q. Has any research been done to show if the law of 
diminishing returns sets in during one of these saturation 
campaigns? In other words, can you over-saturate to the 
point of reaction against a product? 

A. (From Kevin Sweeney) I will be honest. I haven't 
the vaguest idea. There is one agency in this town, a very 
large agency in the top 10 that I think knows as much 
about it as anybody, and they admit they know nothing. 
There's a campaign which I think most of you are fa- 
miliar with, Maxwell House. You know the history of that 
one. It went from about 50, I believe, announcements up 
to as high as 800 and more announcements per week, and 
I don't think that either General Foods or Benton & 
Bowles really knows at what point saturation was reached. 
I think that they have made an attempt to find out. We 
have quite a lot of data based on department stores which 
shows a point of diminishing returns above 400 and some 
odd announcements for a specific one-time event. This is 
a point at which we don't seem to get much more reaction. 
But up to about 400 announcements in a two-day period 
we seem to get pretty good results. 
FRANK PELLEGRIN: I think the purpose of the first 




11 JULY 1955 



267 




question, and maybe Midgley can throw in a thought on 
this, is where does the point of listener objection or over- 
saturation, where does the resentment set in? Ned, have 
you any thought, has there been any research of that that 
you know of? 

NED MIDGLEY: Frankly, I don't know a thing about that. 
I have never seen any research that would indicate it. I 
think the best thing to do is to go from 800 to 1,000 to 
1,200. When sales start dropping off, cut back. 

Q. For a moderately heavy saturation radio campaign, 
say, 100 announcements weekly on an average, do you feel 
there should be a minimum length of the campaign for 
maximum effectiveness, say, six weeks? 
A. (From Kevin Sweeney) Well, I owe a debt to Lincoln. 
It is one of those how-long-should-a-man's-legs-be ques- 
tion. The truth is I don't know. We have been doing a 
large amount of work to find out, and we have been find- 
ing different patterns. We have worked in two markets 
with nighttime announcements and we find different pat- 
terns in people's ability to remember the announcements, 
both of which are in our opinion extremely good radio an- 
nouncements. We think it has something to do with the 
type of products, but we don't know anything about that 
yet. It is a guess, and, thank God, other media don't have 
better answers than we have. 

Q. In connection with the wide coverage of radio and to 
a lesser extent television circulation, what kind of coverage 
or circulation within a week's time do you feel is desirable? 
A. (From Kevin Sweeney) We bought a saturation cam- 
paign for an advertiser, and found again that the ability 
of the human male and female to withstand advertising 
messages is miraculous. For this particular advertiser we 
evolved a scheme under which every family in this area, 
which was a city of 500,000, would be reached 16 times. 
Into his store the next day came the biggest mob of peo- 
ple he ever had, a tremendously successful sale. And yet 
only 60% of the people who were in that store had heard 
about this particular sales event via their radios. * * * 



Seminar 



10, 



PAGE 29 



WHAT DOES COVERAGE COVER? 

Speakers: Julie Brovm, director of media research, Comp- 
ton; Ed Shurick, national director of station relations, 
CBS TV. Moderator of this seminar was Vera Brennan, 
head timebuyer, Scheideler, Beck & Werner, New York. 



HOW TO DETERMINE COVERAGE 

JULIE BROWN: There has never been 
one single standard for coverage in the 
broadcast industry. Actually, this is 
perfectly understandable, because cover- 
age, per se, is used for so many different 
types of media evaluation. 

Coverage can mean the intensity of a 
station's signal, or it can mean the de- 
gree of a station's penetration. It can 
determine the extent of a media plan 
by markets or by sales territories. It must be defined in 
order to determine where coverage is lacking. Coverage is 
needed for station evaluation and selection and, in some 
instances, must be tied in with marketing strategy. 

Some brands may only have distribution in a metropoli- 
tan area. A station whose coverage area best fits this mar- 
ket probably should be used. A brand with national dis- 
tribution, however, might want to choose the larger, or 
largest station in the market. 
Thus, although we have only cited a few reasons, it 




should be self-evident that a timebuyer must/ have good 
sound coverage data for radio and television stations in 
order to do an adequate job in making broadcast pur- 
chases. 

Coverage, as we define it, is the area in which people 
can receive the signal of the station and do listen or view 
the station on some kind of a regular basis. Thus, the 
primary or effective coverage area of a station is the area 
in which we may assume that most people can and do hear 
or see the station. 

If we wanted to be able to develop sound coverage areas 
for all radio and television stations, we should have an up- 
to-date county by county survey showing the percent of 
homes that listen to or view each station with some degree 
of frequency. Unfortunately, this type of study has not 
been made since 1952, when Nielsen conducted its cover- 
age study and the Standard Audit Measurement, common- 
ly called SAMS, was made. These studies still are valid for 
the majority of the radio stations. But, unfortunately, the 
pre-freeze tv stations which were on the air at that time 
have almost without exception changed power, antenna 
height, or channel position and therefore the 1952 data 
can no longer pertain to television coverage. 

The NCS and SAMS studies were a source of data 
showing the percent of homes that listened to radio sta- 
tions, day and night, at least once a week. These percents 
cannot be used as an absolute measure of the percent of 
homes which actually listen to the station on any regular 
basis. Subconsciously, program popularity must have en- 
tered into the respondent's mind when he listed the sta- 
tions listened to regularly. Therefore, the figure derived 
from the study may be inflated or deflated depending upon 
whether the station carried programs that were uppermost 
in the respondent's mind at the time the ballot was filled 
in. These figures also cannot be used as an indication of 
the share of audience of the stations in a particular coun- 
ty as they do not relate to any one program but merely to 
total unduplicated listening within a given period. 

Many will say that television has affected radio to such 
an extent in the last three years that the 1952 figures are 
no longer valid. However, we believe that if the NCS and 
SAMS data is used to define coverage areas rather than 
to determine the actual size of the station audience, there 
is no reason why the 1952 data is still not true today. The 
levels of station listening may have changed in the last 
three years, but the area in which people can and do listen 
to the station should not have changed, all other things 
being equal. 

However, the 1952 data is out-of-date for stations which 
have changed power and frequency, have had a change in 
network affiliation or for new stations which have come on 
the air in the last three years. For these stations, it is 
necessary to develop coverage patterns based on an engi- 
neering concept. We like to consider the 0.5 millivolt area 
as the primary coverage area of a radio station. This must 
be calculated according to its power, frequency, and the 
ground conductivity in its service area. Many stations 
have these maps available. When there is no map avail- 
able, it is necessary for the agency to calculate the cover- 
age area themselves. 

If one of these stations has a map showing measured 
field strength (popularly called "proof of performance" 
maps) on the 0.5 millivolt, we prefer to use it since it 
shows the actual rather than the theoretical engineering 
coverage area for the station. 

There are two other types of coverage data which all of 
us are plagued with from time to time. These are mail 
maps and miscellaneous coverage claims by the stations. 
Usually these are put out by overzealous station managers 
or promotion people who are trying to claim all outdoors 
for their station to be able to get more business. Mail 
maps, we believe, do not indicate a station's true coverage 
area. On any type of mail promotion, it has always been 
felt that those who write in (whether it be just a fan letter 
or whether it be for a special offer) are a different type of 
person than the majority of listeners and are therefore not 
typical of the entire audience of the station. Further, 




YOl MIGHT RUN THE 120-YAJtR HURDLES 

MJV 13 % SECS.*- 

II 1 T . . . YOU NEED WKZO RADIO 



6-COUNTY PULSE REPORT 

(ALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK AREA— MARCH, 1955 

SHARE OF AUDIENCE MONDAY-FRIDAY 



12 noon 


6 p.m. 


midnight 


WKZO 


41% 


37% 


35% 


Station B 


18 


17 


16 


Station C 


10 


12 


II 


Station D 


10 


9 


7 


Station E 


8 


7 


8 


Others 


14 


18 


24 


Sets-ln-Use 


20. 1 % 


20.2% 


17.5% 



\0TE: Battle Creek's home county (Calhoun) was included 
n this Pulse sampling, and provided ,i0 r o oi all interviews. The 
uher five counties: Allegan, Barry, Kalamazoo, St. Joseph and 
Van Buren. 



>*■'"-% 




</ 

WKZO — KALAMAZOO 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

KOLN-TV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 



TO SET RECORDS 

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radio in Kalamazoo. 

Nielsen figures show that WKZO gets 177.7'. more aver- 
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left, credit WKZO with more than TWICE AS M \!\Y listen- 
ers as Station B, day and night ! 

Your Avery-Knodel man will be glad to give you full 
details. 

mzo 

CBS RADIO FOR KALAMAZOO 
AND GREATER WESTERN MICHIGAN 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



*Richard Attlesey set this world's record in Fresno, California, in May, 1950. 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



mail offers are influenced too much by the personality 
making the offer, the type of offer, and the time that the 
offer was made. We have seen mail maps that claim cover- 
age from such distant areas that only freak signals could 
possibly have been received by those writing in. Others 
show coverage in areas where local rating services do not 
show any listening. For all of these reasons, we do not 
t( lieve that a mail map is any indication of a station's 
coverage area. (This holds true, of course, for television, 
as well as radio.) 

These days it seems that every station is coverage con- 
scious. We believe the majority of them are honest in their 
coverage claims, but it is absolutely necessary for them to 
document them very carefully before we can accept them. 
If it is an engineering map, the basis of the measurement 
should be labeled. If it is not an engineering map, then the 
basis of the station claims should be stated. We have seen 
maps that were based on interviews by the station mana- 
ger with friends in towns possibly 100 miles distant which 
could not conceivably be within the primary coverage area 
of the station. These are the kind of coverage claims we 
must be very leary about. On the other hand, other cov- 
erage maps are shown to us by station men which are 
based on a combination of engineering, proof of perform- 
ance, and local rating services. These, when well docu- 
mented, can certainly be used for station coverage since 
they show the area in which people can listen to the sta- 
tion and in which there is good evidence that people do 
listen to the station. (Again, these comments apply equal- 
ly well to television as radio.) 

There is absolutely no television data today which shows 
county-by-county the percent of homes that can and do 
view television stations. Some of the networks have this 
data in one form or another for their own affiliates but 
cannot or will not supply it to agencies and advertisers for 
individual stations (mainly, we understand, for political 
reasons). The networks will, however, show us the total 
coverage area for a specific station lineup, but this does 
net help us in determining the coverage of any one station 
(either on a spot or network basis) nor does it tell us how 
much duplication exists between stations on the lineup. 

Advertisers are spending vast sums of money today in 
television, but the broadcasting industry is reluctant to 
support a survey which will show these advertisers what 
kind of coverage they are getting. We believe that the 
burden of proof is on the networks and the stations and 
that they should supply the advertisers and agencies with 
good sound television coverage data. When NCS and 
SAMS were conducted in 1952, it was believed that they or 
some other similar survey would be conducted again in a 
couple of years so that tv coverage data could be kept up 
to date. However, except for the private study done by 
Nielsen for CBS in the fall of 1953, we know of no other 
nationwide survey that has been conducted. We hope that, 
before too long, the networks will bury the hatchet and 
get together in sponsoring a national television coverage 
study. 

In the absence of any available method for determining 
the "can and do" area for all television stations, we must 
rely on an engineering concept to define a television sta- 
tion's primary coverage area. The one that we believe is 
the best measurement is the FCC definition of Grade B 
area. This is an engineering concept of signal strength 
and is defined by the FCC as the area in which an ac- 
ceptable signal is available to the average home in 50% 
of the area 90% of the time. This can be determined ac- 
cording to formula, given the effective radiated power, an- 
tenna height above average terrain, and channel number. 
In many cases, these maps <for current operating condi- 
tions) were filed with the FCC at the time the application 
for the station was made. In other instances, however, a 
station is now on a higher power, has changed its trans- 
mitter location, or is using a different height tower than 
that filed with the original application. If no map is avail- 
able under these circumstances, we have found the Head- 
ley-Reed slide rule invaluable. This slide rule translates 
PAGE 30 the engineering formula based on power, antenna height, 



and channel number into the FCC definition of Grade B 
service area, so that it is possible to determine the Grade 
B service area of the station. The coverage area, so deter- 
mined, has to be a circle. Topography, of course, has a 
great deal to do with a station's coverage area, but it is 
impossible for the layman to translate the Headley-Reed 
slide rule circle to a topographical map. 

This can be done by the station engineers and in many 
cases, where topography plays an important part in the 
station's coverage area, stations actually have made mea- 
sured field strength maps <or proof of performance maps) 
which show the Grade B service area for the station and 
take into account peculiar problems of terrain, adjacent 
channel and co-channel interference, etc. These are the 
most accurate tv coverage maps available to us today. 

We do have several "do view" sources available to us 
which enable us to define more accurately a station's cov- 
erage area. These include the local rating surveys such as 
ARB, Hooper, Pulse, and Videodex, and also the ARB and 
Videodex uhf studies. Since the rating surveys show the 
percent of homes who actually view stations and the uhf 
studies show the percent of homes that are able to receive 
stations and the percent that view most, all of this data 
should be considered in developing coverage areas for a 
station. Once information from local rating and uhf 
studies are combined with engineering maps, we have a 
"can and do" definition of a station's coverage area. (Un- 
fortunately, these surveys have usually been conducted in 
major television markets where no real coverage prob- 
lems exist or else, on a limited scale, in problem areas 
where the local data cannot be used anywhere except 
where the survey was made.) 

Television stations are making as many and possibly 
more exaggerated coverage claims than radio stations and 
certainly are pressuring agency timebuyers to a much 
greater extent. Thus, as in radio, it is necessary to weed 
out the promotional color from station claims before we 
can get anywhere near a sound definition of a station's 
coverage area. However, all stations' stories should be 
listened to. Many times they have data not available any- 
where else (such as independent surveys and information 
from local television service men > . These are certainly 
important and should be considered in deciding coverage. 

HOW A NETWORK CHECKS COVERAGE 

ED SHURICK: I want to divide my por- 
tion of today's discussion into three 
parts. The first part is what techniques 
are employed by CBS TV. Part two. 
how is such information applied. And 
three, what are the needs for coverage 
information. 

First, what are the techniques em- 
ployed by CBS TV. 

Engineering-computed contours. En- 
gineers have a somewhat involved definition. CBS TV in- 
cludes within the service area of .each station all of the 
homes to which the station delivers a signal having the 
minimum required field intensity. 

Sometimes, this is where we are at odds with our affili- 
ates. One might consider our standards as being some- 
what exacting. We require for Channels 2 to 6 that the 
station have a signal of at least 40 dbw minimum intensity. 
For Channels 7 through 13. the minimum standard is 50 
dbw. Above 13. at least 64 dbw. 

Now, this is what our engineers consider will result in 
day-in and day-out dependable service. Of course, an im- 
portant reservation cannot help but be the terrain cf the 
area. As you can appreciate, with a transmitter located on 
one side of a mountain, you cannot draw a circle indicat- 
ing effective service on the other side. This, therefore, 
brings us to the second type of criteria <of seven types) 
used at CBS TV in the determination of coverage. This is 
an actual measured engineering contour. 




IUWA I ^™^^^^ 

Almanac 




CROSS SECTION OF THE IOWA AUDIENCE 



When they bought their first television set almost six year ago, their program 
source was WOI Television. Through the years they have found that WOI-T\ 
programming kindles their interest, maintains their loyalty. 

Multiply their story by the 315,600 television families in the WOI-TV area, and 
you'll see why WOI Television is the key station in Central Iowa. 




WOI-TV 



AMES-DES MOINES 
IOWA STATE COLLEGE 
ABC FOR CENTRAL IOWA 
REPRESENTED BY WEEDTELEVISION 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



It is all right to sit down with a slide rule and deter- 
mine theoretically where a station covers, but we also 
should know what homes the station actually does cover. 
In most cases the station, if they can afford $4,000 or 
$5,000 for this, will commission a licensed engineer to make 
an on-the-scene, measured contour map of its coverage. 
The engineer measures along radiants from the trans- 
mitting point, the strength of the station's signal. 

Such a measurement is very important. It is important 
because in many wide open areas like, let us say, Oklahoma 
and Kansas, the "computed" contour can short-change a 
station. But when one gets into an area like the New 
England states, it might be found that a station which 
considers that it covers the entire market does not get 
down into the valleys where population of important cities 
is concentrated. So we are always anxious to see this 
kind of information. 

Now, for the third source of coverage data. The A. C. 
Nielsen set count and "circulation" studies. I would like 
to repeat that the first study was made in May 1952, at 
which time it was a network cooperative effort. The 
personal interview- type approach was used, and the survey 
encompassed a nationwide sample of 100,000 homes. It 
not only determined by counties and county- clusters how 
many homes owned television sets, but at the same time 
found out how many families viewed a given television 
station at least once a week. 

In 1953 (May 1953) CBS TV went to the expense of 
up-dating the set ownership portion of the survey. This 
was accomplished through mathematical growth curves, 
indicating growth of set ownership, county-by-county. A 
book was published on the estimates. CBS TV tried to get 
the industry together again in 1953 for the purpose of 
making another national study. This was found to be 
impossible. Therefore, CBS TV went to the expense itself 
of undertaking a set count study, cotsing some $75,000. 
This study up-dated the figures as of November 1953. 

At the same time we obtained some additional data that 
has been somewhat on the Q.T. In the questionnaire that 
Nielsen sent out at the time was a question: "Which 
channels can you receive?" 

Prom that, after a great deal of experimentation, we 
were able to convert the station reception data into 
"circulation." This was a very complicated process, and 
a great deal of time went into it. But we do have this 
exclusive information and daily use is made of it. 

Now, the fourth type of coverage data is that of mail 
response. I have the same lack of appreciation for this 
type of information as evidenced by Julie. It is interesting 
to see it. It is interesting to learn that somebody out one 
hundred miles from the transmitter point can pick up a 
given station, but it can be very misleading information. 
We want to know about the hundreds of people living 
around the correspondent who did not write. We would 
like to know what kind of reception they are getting. The 
chances are that since the station didn't hear from them, 
there is not only reason to believe that maybe the people 
are different from those who did write, but quite possibly 
such people cannot and did not pick up the particular 
station. 

Another example of coverage information is the tele- 
vision dealer comments on installations. We have used this 
approach to good success at CBS TV. Our engineering 
people will call individual television set dealers in a given 
market and ask what kind of problems they have run into 
in trying to install sets in the particular area. 

Next are the ARB uhf studies. We use them primarily in 
regard to the problems peculiar to uhf. The studies consist 
of 1,000 telephone calls selected at random from the 
published phone book for the particular area. Such an 
approach has its limitations, but it does give us an indica- 
tion as to how conversions are progressing. 

Now, the seventh type of coverage data we use is "on the 

spot" inspection of a given station's reception. Most of 

us in station relations (and in engineering) from time to 

time have made door-to-door surveys in various cities to 

PAGE 31 see how the station under consideration is doing reception- 



wise. We are subjected to the same promotional approach 
by affiliates that the agencies face — maybe even more so. 

On various occasions we have received photographs of 
the wonderful reception of a station. At first, I took the 
pictures at face value. But when one takes a photograph 
off the tube, the image looks fine for it moves slowly. But 
"snow" moves about so swiftly that it can't be photo- 
graphed. Therefore, the picture you see is the object 
minus the snow. 

The second part of this discussion is — how such in- 
formation is actually applied by CBS Television. In the 
first place we do utilize the findings in a composite picture 
of our CBS Television facilities in terms of the network 
as a whole. We find that today television per se represents 
potentially about 94% of all the United States homes. 

I will underline "potentially." We don't necessarily reach 
them because not all own television sets — and of the 94% 
of total U.S., 98.6% of the homes are potentially within 
the reach of the television signal of a CBS Television 
affiliated station. 

We also use our coverage data to determine coverage for 
a specific program's lineup of stations. If Julie wanted a 
coverage map of her particular lineup for a Procter & 
Gamble program, we could and would produce such a 
map. We do not indicate areas of station overlap, but 
■provided is a composite map showing coverage for the 
country as a whole. Today we have something which is a 
little bit unusual as far as television coverage maps are 
concerned. Two levels of coverage are indicated: "intense" 
coverage and "secondary" coverage. 

Another use for coverage information is very, very im- 
portant today — certainly to use as a network. This con- 
cerns the coverage of individual stations. And here is 
something we keep under lock and key for what I hope are 
obvious reasons. 

We have had in operation now for over a year a CBS TV 
Affiiliation Plans Committee. It is made up of representa- 
tives of engineering, research, sales and the station re- 
lations department. Each request for an affiliation or a 
rate increase must be passed upon by this committee. 

Over the past year, this committee has processed over 
200 requests for rate increases, of which close to 50% 
have been denied because the stations did not come up 
to certain circulation standards. I have regretted our 
inability to publicize such activities for it is quite obvious 
that many agencies today have the impression that all an 
affiliate has to do is to ask for a rate increase and it is 
automatically given. 

As you are aware, certain stations, no matter how you 
set up the network, cause problems of overlap. If you 
specify such overlap, you have to be absolutely sure you 
are right. An affiliate has a perfect right to question what 
overlap is charged against his coverage and there are many 
instances of such overlap discussions within the family. 

The fourth way in which we use coverage data is to 
develop and maintain a master blueprint for the network. 
I don't know whether or not you remember the talks of 
Dr. Frank Stanton and Mr. Jack Van Volkenburg before 
the ANA about a year and a half ago. They discussed the 
future costs of tv. The promise was made that we would 
keep our costs in line. On returning from these meetings, 
CBS Television went to work on blueprint plans of the 
future. Our Basic Required network and our Basic 
Optional stations total 100 stations. They represent 83.4% 
of the total homes in the country. 

Now, if an advertiser at some future date buys an hour 
on these particular stations when there is 100% set 
saturation, the cost will be in the neighborhood of 
$112,000 an hour. These are cost projections based upon 
pricing policies now in effect. Of course there are numer- 
ous "holes" in the network coverage pattern that have to 
be filled in by supplementary stations. 

In conclusion, what are the shortcomings and the needs 
for coverage information? First, it is not enough merely 
to show by engineering estimates that a signal theoretically 
reaches 50, 60, or even 100 miles out into an area, and 
secondly, it is not enough either merely to know by mail 




\\ ith innate Immodesty, \%»- call your 
attention to a Fact: 

Amarillo is again No. I for the nation in 
retail sales per household . . . for the third 
consecutive year. If this suggests that 
we're worth an advertising iniestment, it's 
no coincidence. 



KCNC AM 
KCNC TV 



Amarillo, Texas 



NBC Affiliate 

Nat'l reps: The Karz Agency 



11 JULY 1955 



273 



SVttpA TIMEBUYING 
— BASICS 






response that with ideal weather conditions Mrs. Kalabash 
out here in some small outlying district can pick up the 
station during unusual favorable climatic conditions exist- 
ing at the time she saw the station. This is something we 
are very greatly interested in, just as the agencies are. 
It would be helpful to know that X number of families 
tune in once, three, five and even seven times a week. We 
would like to know this, too — not every two years or so — 
but for every month of the year or at least on a quarterly 
basis. 

CBS Research recently investigated the up-to-date 
cost of such a survey, on only a one-time basis. Accord- 
ing to A. C. Nielsen, the cost is well over half a million 
dollars. CBS TV is willing to contribute its share of that 
cost, but I am afraid by the interest prevailing throughout 
the industry in terms of dollar outlay, Nielsen may have 
to pass the hat to make up the remainder. 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Q. Which would you say is more important, a county by 
county set count or a can-view and do-view count by 
counties? 

A. »From Julie Brown) They go almost hand in hand, 
but if we have a set count county by county, we have no 
idea how to cover those homes if we don't have a can- 
view county by county. So I think first we would have to 
know how many people there are in the counties that are 
equipped to receive the signal. 

Q. Even though families sending in mail are not typical, 
isn't there some significant county by county correlation 
of ratio to home county population? 

A. <From Ed Shurick) For the lack of something else, 
we can always use this kind of a relationship. From our 
Nielsen reception data we applied the old NAB-type home 
county formula to determine "intense" and "secondary" 
coverage counties. The home county was considered as 
100%, and those counties reporting 75% as good reception 
as the home county were included as "intense" coverage. 
Between 25% and 75%, the counties were considered as 
"secondary" coverage. But remember again, it isn't only 
important that we hear from people who have seen the 
station's signal. Another important thing is to find out 
about the others who did not write in to us. * * * 



Seminar 



11. 



DOES MERCHANDISING SELL MERCHANDISE? 

Speakers: Howard Abrahams, then manager of sales pro- 
motion, visual merchandising, NRDGA, now executive staff, 
Amos Parrish, Inc.; Stanley Arnold, head of sales promo- 
tion division, merchandising department, Y&R. Moderator 
was Mary McKenna, research director, WNEW, New York. 



HOW DEPARTMENT STORES MERCHANDISE 



PAGE 32 



HOWARD ABRAHAMS: When stores 
think of merchandising, they think of 
buying merchandise and offering it for 
sale. You in radio and television, on the 
other hand, have an entirely different 
interpretation of the word "merchan- 
dising". It is what we call sales promo- 

WkL. mk By sales promotion retailers mean the 

use of the various types of media, radio 

and television included, to produce sales. And the different 

media, as you all know, includes in addition to radio and 

television all the other tools of selling we use in stores. 

One word of caution. A store never, or rarely thinks of 




any advertising medium as the one medium which is going 
to produce all the sales it needs. Rather, it is the coordi- 
nation of all these things (and that word is terribly im- 
portant in stores) the coordination of every medium which 
you can pull together and use successfully to make sales. 

For example, the store runs an ad in the newspapers. It 
is logical and normal for that store to immediately take 
that ad and develop the merchandise which the ad por- 
trays in other ways — window display being device number 
1. So if you walk past the store that evening or that 
afternoon of the next day, you may have already forgotten 
about the ad as a technique which brought you there; but 
if you see the window, you will get the extra reminder. 
Then when you get inside the store, other things in the 
store, point-of-sale, will help to try to recall to your mind 
the reason why you got there and thus increase the 
store's sales. 

What I want to do is indicate some of the promotional 
devices, merchandising you would call them, which stores 
use to take all the juice out of the orange, all of these 
different things we use to make sales. 

Stores actually divide the thinking or promotions in 
terms of external and internal promotion devices. 

External promotions include publications like the maga- 
zines and the newspapers which stores use; shopping news 
where they use them; school papers; religious papers; 
directories; theatre programs; and the stuff ers you get 
in your packages. It includes merchandise tags which you 
see tied on to the merchandise when you get it home. It 
includes the car cards which are used in the subway. It 
includes the placards and the painted walls and posters, 
and every other sign device possible. 

Now we come to the internal store promotion: 

By internal we mean the kinds of promotion which the 
store uses and doesn't have to go out of the store to buy 
from the newspapers or radio or tv. These include, of 
course, the house organs, which practically all stores have 
in one form or another, in order to communicate with their 
employees. The house organs will often include blow-ups 
of store ads. They will also include advance proofs of ads 
and displays which the store uses. 

Then we go on to other internal promotion which include 
the actual window displays themselves, and that is some- 
thing which the stores consider extremely important today 
in their full promotion outlook. Then we get into give- 
aways which stores at times will offer as gimmicks to 
customers in and around the store. 

Now we get on to signs, differing from the other signs I 
mentioned. These are internal signs — signs on the 
counters themselves. This is one point where radio and 
television is usually merchandised within a store. Those 
signs include bulletin boards to the store people as well. 

Internal devices also include packages — and I recall a 
store which did quite a bit of radio and some television 
fashion shows as well. They used a device in their actual 
packages, where on the underside of the box had a 
message about the radio program the store was using. 

Then we get down to the public address system. Many 
stores are experimenting with various types of internal 
P.A. systems in order to sell a message to the people in 
that store. If you go up the escalators today in Altman's, 
you will hear a store message. It could be a tie-in — at 
present it isn't — but it could be a tie-in for a radio or 
television operation which they might possibly be doing. 

The elevator announcements fall in the same category. 
Then we jump to the different kinds of public relations 
activities within stores — the cooking schools, fashion 
shows, the sewing classes, which stores do internally. The 
employee contests, clubs, anniversaries, birthdays, holi- 
days, stunts, and so forth, come next. 

Then there are the various things which some stations 
in the country offer to stores to help them with their 
promotional tie-ins and to help them merchandise then- 
programs : pre-announcements, courtesy announcements, 
newspaper ads in which you tell the readers who is on the 
air, magazine ads. Some stations run advertising columns 
about the programs on the air. Some stations in the 




IN NEW ENGLAND'S 

j2nd MafiqMt 

MARKET 




PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND 



CHERRY & WEBB BROADCASTING COMPANY 



REPRESENTED 
BY BLAIR-TV 







11 JULY 1955 



275 



\«H TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 




country will provide signs which they get into theatre 
lobbies, hotel lobbies and other public locations. Some 
stations do individual displays, prepare them for the store 
to use in order to tie in to the station itself. 

Another technique is "remotes" from the store. You 
know what I mean by that — the technique of helping the 
store in putting on a show or even commercial within the 
store itself. 

I only want to leave you then with one thought as a 
result of all this. If you are working with retailers, don't 
think that radio and television is the only one medium 
which they have to use and which they should use perhaps 
to the elimination of everything else. Store people think 
strictly in terms of a great big promotion package, and 
they try to use that package in every way they can, one 
to build the other. 



THE SUPER MARKET REVOLUTION 

-^ STANLEY ARNOLD: For 17 of the past 
20 years I have been in the super market 
business. We in this country have been 
going through a real retail revolution. 

Up to 1937 the bulk of the U.S. food 
business was done by the small retailer. 
Starting in about 1937, we had the 
growth of super markets; large self- 
service stores, selling nationally adver- 
tised brands at popular prices and with 
plenty of parking. Today 50% of all the food business of 
the United States is done in 5% of all of the food stores. 
There are 360,000 food stores in this country, 18,000 of 
them are self-service super markets. They do half of all 
the food business done in the country. 

The super markets are getting bigger and bigger. While 
it is true that there are perhaps 40 or 44% of the counties 
of the country that do not have any super markets, still 
you can see what a grip the super markets do have on 
the food business. 

Super markets have in some cases been the outgrowth 
of companies that have been in the food business for 
25, 50, or 100 years, but in many cases, they are the out- 
growth of the imagination and the ingenuity of old-time 
single store operators, men who had great courage and 
had convictions. Some of these men who used to be lucky 
to do $10, $15, $20,000 a year today are doing $100,000,000 
a year, and it is not too unusual a success story. 

These men have built these large markets and have put 
in all types of retail innovations. They have introduced 
new products. 

For example, you can find rattlesnake meat in many a 
super market. And French-fried caterpillars. 

Now if there is one thing that nobody could ever sell at 
retail, that is water, but I went down to Gimbel's and 
I got a can of drinking water they are selling at two cans 
for a quarter. So I guess you can sell anything in food in 
this country today. Actually this can is marked for use — 
a frightening thought — in case of bacteriological or atomic 
warfare. We hope that they don't ever have any market 
for it. 

In Cleveland we experimented with a little showmanship 
in food retailing, which I'll tell you about. We used radio 
and radio personalities to sell food and they did some job 
for us. For example, last 24 May we opened a store in 
Cleveland, and although the population of Cleveland and 
its suburbs is 1,600,000, the opening of this unit was 
witnessed by 55 million people, because this store was 
opened by Arthur Godfrey. We asked Arthur Godfrey if 
he would open the store and tie in a sale which we would 
put on featuring all of Godfrey's merchandise from Buf- 
ferin to Kleenex to National Biscuit Co. products, Good 
Luck Margarine, and on and on through the sponsors. 
He was willing to and did, and we had the biggest opening 
we ever had in history. It was intensified by the Godfrey 
PAGE 33 broadcasts and telecasts starting three and half weeks 



before we opened, telling people that for the first time in 
his life he was going to actually open a super market. 

The highlight of the year, as far as we were concerned, 
took place twice — on 1 March and on 19 July. On the 
first of March we had a blizzard in Cleveland. It was the 
last of the big snowfalls of the year. We stood in our 
offices and looked out of the window and wondered what 
we were in business for, because certainly nobody could 
get out to do any shopping. 

We got an idea. We had every person employed by the 
company go outside and we started from nine in the morn- 
ing to make snowballs the size of an indoor baseball. We 
packed them in banana crates and we put them in cold 
storage at twenty degrees below zero, and we let them sit 
there until 19 July. 

At that time we took them out. We used 900 snowballs 
for publicity purposes. We sent them packed in dry ice 
to every radio and every television celebrity whose shows 
were beamed into Cleveland. The result was that Arthur 
Godfrey was throwing snowballs on his program. Ed 
Sullivan was throwing them on his, Dave Garroway, 
Walter Kronkite, Arlene Francis, and so on, and in each 
case we sent a card along telling folks that we were going 
to put on the biggest blizzard of values ever seen in the 
history of Cleveland. And these people talked about it. 

We sent Harry Truman a box of snowballs with a card 
reading, "Hope you recover as fast as these melt." We 
sent the President a box of snowballs with a card reading, 
"Hope international tensions melt away as fast as these 
snowballs." 

We attracted tremendous publicity. Mr. Truman was 
kind enough to call in a wire release and this made the 
the first pages of the Cleveland papers. 

So on Monday everybody knew if you went to the Pick & 
Pay Stores you could get a snowball, although it was 
99 degrees in the shade. We gave away 500 snowballs, in 
each of the 15 stores. When we rang a bell, whoever was 
checking out would get a snowball. The snowball would 
be worth a prize. We had the biggest week in the 17 -year 
history of the business. 

Now, what can you do to improve the use of radio or the 
use of television as far as super markets are concerned? I 
can't think of a lot of things that are new, because you 
are doing a great many things, but I can think of a few. 

First of all, I think what the average super market 
operator is interested in is this. You folks sitting in this 
room certainly know more about radio and television than 
I will ever know, and certainly, more than super market 
operators across the country know, or will know. So I 
think that it is one of your duties to keep these people 
informed on what is around in radio and television and 
on ingenious ideas that can be used by them to increase 
their business. 

Second, we used the chain lightning broadcast in our 
stores, and I found that mass displays are what everybody 
is interested in. Now, in our case we had 12 end tables. 
We carried 4,000 grocery items. So that when a man came 
in and asked for end table display, much as we might 
want to give it to him, he was really asking for the moon. 
In many cases super market chains sell this valuable space 
in connection with newspaper or circular advertising. 

So I think that it should be borne in mind that a cart 
loaded with merchandise can do as good a job in many 
instances as an end table display, and that if you ask for 
a cart display you might open up a new avenue of mer- 
chandising that is not now being exploited. 

I think, also, that when radio people operate in con- 
junction with super market people, they should operate 
on the headquarters level in addition to the store level. 
What I mean is this. In our case, we had instances, and 
I have heard of this from other operators, where a 
promised display was not up and the man from the radio 
station would go out to the store and would bawl the 
jibbers out of the store manager for not having the display 
up. Actually, the store manager doesn't care very much 
because it isn't his job to care. The people who are paid 
to care are those in the downtown offices, and sometimes 



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277 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



you can alienate a man on the firing line by going to him 
whereas if you approach the headquarters level and they 
are advised about it they will straighten it out with their 
stores and you have complete cooperation with a minimum 
of difficulty. 

Further, I think that the one point that I would like to 
stress more than anything else is that these super markets 
across the country carry names like Hinky Dinky and 
Humpty Dumpty and Red Owl, and Big Bear, and so on, 
and that is something that tells me — and I am sure tells 
you — that these are men of imagination and daring who 
are not afraid to explore new fields and do not try to do 
business by the staid old formulae. That means that you 
don't have to be conservative or hesitant about going to 
them about ideas that may seem radical to you. They 
are all looking for something unusual. They are all look- 
ing for something new to do, something that hasn't been 
done before, and they are perfectly willing to try almost 
anything that seems reasonable or realistic for them. * * * 



Seminar 



12. 




VRE ARF STANDARDS ADEQUATE FOR RADIO? 

Speakers: Daniel Denenholz, in charge of research & 
sales promotion, The Katz Agency; Maocwell Ule, Chairman 
of the Committee on Standards & Methods, ARF audience 
measurement committee and v.p. in charge of research, 
K&E. Moderator was Gordon Gray, v.p. WOR, New York. 



ARF FINDINGS HURT RADIO 

DAN DENENHOLZ: I can well appreci- 
ate the time spent, the discussions held, 
and the headaches endured by the ARF 
Working Committee in the preparation 
of this Report. I am sure that most of 
the points that I will raise have been 
given a thorough airing by the ARF 
Committee, whose members are to be 
commended for a brave attempt at a 
difficult job. BUT! 
In trying to cover both radio and television with a single 
set of standards the ARF Committee has failed to recognize 
differences between the two media, to the detriment of 
radio ! 
What are some of these differences? 
First, of course, is the number of stations to be measured. 

On the national level there are more than 2,600 am sta- 
tions against 430-odd tv stations. And, locally you have 
such situations as in the New York-Northeastern New 
Jersey Metropolitan district with 34 am stations (not to 
mention 20 fm) vs. seven tv; or in Washington, 15 am, 
four tv; or New Orleans, 11 am, two tv. 

But it's not only the number of stations, it's the variety 
— in coverage and in audience appeal. 

Within a given market there is a rough equality in 
potential coverage of tv stations but in radio you may 
have a coverage range from the 250-watt local channel 
station to the 50,000-watt clear channel. 

As to audience appeal you find a wider diversification 
and growing trend toward specialized programing among 
radio stations. You not only have programs beamed to 
special audiences and age groups but you have farm 
stations, Negro stations, foreign-language stations, good- 
music stations, sports stations, etc. 

What does this mean for audience measurement? Can 

a sample that is used to measure the audience of two, 

three, four or perhaps seven tv stations — with more or less 

of the same type of audience appeal — be adequate to 

PAGE 34 measure the audiences of 11, 15 and up to 34 or more 



radio stations — many with specialized audience appeal, 
that can be received in one locality? 

And how about the multiple radio sets and their wide 
dispersal throughout the home? And the increasing 
volume of out-of-home radio listening: the portable sets, 
the automobile sets, and the listening to sets not "associ- 
ated with the household?" Or the fact that radio is 
becoming more and more an individual rather than a 
group activity? Don't these factors argue for differences 
in standards of measuring radio audiences as against tv 
audiences? 

As I read the ARF Report it struck me that there are 
four major areas of controversy: 

1. Minimum sample size. 

2. Exposure to a broadcast should be measured in 
terms of set tuning. (Basic Information Standard 1 of 
the ARF report.) 

3. The unit of measurement should be the household. 
(Standard 2.) 

4. The measurement should report the average instan- 
taneous audience. (Standard 6.) 

Let's look at these, one by one: 

First, Sample size. I have indicated above a feeling that 
the recommended minimum sample might be inadequate 
for radio, not only because of the number and types of 
stations to be measured but also the dispersal of receivers 
and the growing individualism of listening. These are some 
of the factors that result in a lower range of ratings for 
radio than for tv. Larger samples are necessary to minimize 
the sampling error which can make quite a difference at 
these lower rating ranges. 

The Report gives a table (page 29) showing the ARF 
Maximum Sampling Error Standard for ratings ranging 
from 0.5 to 75.0 based on a sample for a local report using 
400 cases to represent a universe of one million households. 
From this table we read that for a rating of 1.0 repre- 
senting an estimated audience of 10,000, the ARF maxi- 
mum sampling error standard is 4,975. In other words, 
the true audience would range between 5,025 and 14,975. 
Reinterpreted in ratings, the range would be from 0.5 to 
1.5. That's quite a difference. As the ratings increase, the 
sampling error is not so important. With a rating of 
75.0 representing an estimated audience of 750,000, the 
table shows a maximum sampling error standard of 
21,651. The true audience, therefore, would range between 
728,349 and 771,651; a rating range between 72.8 and 77.2. 
That's nothing to get excited about. 

The second likely area of controversy is the Standard, 
"Exposure to a broadcast should be measured in terms 
of set tuning." 

So that you'll know what I am talking about, let me 
read from the Report : 

"There are various levels of attentiveness which could 
serve for the definition of an 'audience'. On the one 
extreme there is the minimum requirement of set tuning. 
By set tuning we mean that a set be both turned on and 
receiving the program for which an estimated program 
audience size measurement is being obtained. On the other 
extreme one could require that the exposed individual be 
giving his undivided attention to the broadcast. This could 
be called an 'attention' level of exposure. Between these 
two extremes there are various levels, such as: 

"a) 'attended sets' — which could mean all tuned in sets 
that have one or more persons physically present. 

"b> 'listening or viewing' — which could be the subjective 
opinion of the respondent as to whether or not he was 
paying attention to a program." 

The Report recommends the "concept of tuning as its 
standard of exposure" since in the words of the Report it 
"is the most objective of various levels of exposure ... it 
is the only measurement which does not require a subjec- 
tive evaluation of some kind on the part of the exposed 
person." 

Although I'm not a partisan of any of the rating 
services, this concept of "tuning" seems to me to rule out 
all methods except the "Recorder" — since it is the only 
method that can be considered truly "objective." The 



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and Brown also called the bank . . . 
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WMRE covered all the angles of 
the robbery for its listeners and for 
all other AP members as well. 

Cooperation? At the time of the 
robbery, WMRE had not begun to 
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279 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



Recorder is the "method which electronically or mechan- 
ically records, automatically, individual set tuning." It is 
true that the Report states "all methods can produce 
estimates of set tuning," but if absolute objectivity is to 
be the standard, how can any method that requires re- 
sponse from a human being qualify? 

Adoption of "tuning" as a basic standard automatically 
relegates such important factors as number of listeners 
and viewers and their characteristics (age, sex, etc.) to a 
supplementary standard since it is impossible to count and 
identify individuals with a machine method. 

Further, the use of "tuning" as a standard will increase 
the difficulty and problem of measuring the full audience. 
This is not so important, at the present time, for tv but the 
"tuning" standard will seriously short-change radio. 

If my premise is correct that the Recorder is the only 
method that can meet the standard of absolute objectivity, 
how will it be possible to measure the full radio audience? 
The Report concedes that a "Recorder cannot produce 
estimates of exposure to all radio sets in the household 
because it cannot measure exposure to battery and port- 
able sets." How about auto sets? (I suppose it's possible 
but not practicable.) How about listening to sets not 
associated with the household — such as in stores, offices, 
factories, and somebody else's home? 

Which brings us to the next controversial standard: 
The unit of measurement should be the household. 

I do not quarrel with this so long as the standard re- 
quires that all listening be measured and related to a 
household base. 

In defining household sets the Report says. "This con- 
cept includes both in- and out-of-home tuning, whether it 
is in the home itself, in an automobile, or a portable set 
used away from the household, just so long as the set is 
associated with the household being measured." 

It then goes on, "This definition excludes such tuning 
as that which occurs in bars, restaurants, and places of 
employment since these sets are not part of a household 
universe." Why exclude this part of the audience so long 
as the individuals who are exposed to radio or tv in these 
places can be related to a household universe? Here we 
see one of the dilemmas created by the use of "tuning" as 
a standard. If the standard were "listening," office or 
factory listening could be measured by interviewing the 
listener in his home using one of the recall methods. 

According to the recommendation, "A household is con- 
sidered to be exposed to a program if at least one set 
associated with the household is exposed to the program." 

But if a household should be counted because the man 
of the family, for example, tuned to the radio in his own 
car, why shouldn't it be counted if he listened in while 
riding in his friend's car? 

The fourth potentially controversial point is, "The 
measurement should report the average instantaneous 
audience." 

In justifying the standard of "average instantaneous 
audience" as against "total audience" the Report says: 
"A total audience measurement while counting all house- 
holds which were exposed over an arbitrary minimum of 
time counts them all equally, regardless of how long they 
were exposed over that minimum. For this reason a total 
audience size measurement will not permit comparison of 
audience size measurements for programs of different 
duration." 

This comparison of measurements for programs of 
different duration is a favorite game on the network level 
— but on the station level, for national-spot and local 
advertisers, the primary need is for measurements in 
15-minute segments regardless of the length of the pro- 
gram. If all measurements were in 15-minute segments 
it should not make much difference, from a practical point 
of view, if the measurement was "average instantaneous 
audience" or "total audience." 

This illustrates another facet of the measurement prob- 
lem. I'm referring to a possible difference in standards for 
local audience measurements as against national. Such 
PAGE 35 differences are implied throughout the Report but do not 



appear to have been sufficiently explored. For the most 
part, the Report seems to be primarily concerned with 
the national level. 

To many the ARF Report is likely to prove a disappoint- 
ment. Let's face it! It is not the report for which the 
industry has been waiting. It's, perhaps, but a first step, 
necessary, I suppose, to provide a frame of reference for 
the real evaluation of audience measurement services 
which is yet to come. 



AIMS OF THE ARF REPORT 




m G.MAX WELL ULE : Unfortunately, what 
Dan has just said has been covered 
^ 2> *M many times in our general discussions. 

This is not new. It is the considered 
judgment of the people on this commit- 
tee that this report was conceived in 
controversy, born in controversy, and I 
think the controversy will rage for a 
long while. 
We think we are justified in making 
these recommendations for a number of important rea- 
sons. First of all, there is no simple solution to the rather 
complex problem of radio and television measurements. 
We should however, be playing in the same ball field, so 
to speak. 

In other words, over the past generation, much of the 
controversy resided in the fact that we were measuring 
different universes, so to speak, or different areas. We were 
measuring with different techniques which measured dif- 
ferent aspects, so-called, of listening or exposure. 

Now, in our general discussion, we realized very early 
that unless we had some common, or agreed upon stand- 
ards, we could live with, there was no possible way of 
reconciling the differences among rating methods. Our 
basic objective was to set up criteria which would tend to 
reduce or minimize the variation among the various rating 
methods or among the various audience size measurements 
that are received, regardless of who the practitioner was, 
regardless of the methodology used. Without that we will 
continue with the same general confusion as we have had 
in the past. 

Now, let me say this, that like all problems in the social 
sciences these are not all black or all white. We think that 
our suggestions are reasonable standards that we can de- 
fend rather vigorously in terms of our objectives on the 
one hand and what we know in general about the limita- 
tions and strengths of the various research methodologies 
in trying to get radio and television measurements. 

On a number of occasions there was not unanimity in 
this committee, but we think there was a high degree of 
toleration of the fact that in this imperfect world these 
are the best of all possible standards that we can agree 
upon and still have some sort of general recommendation 
for the industry over-all. 

In this group activity, of course, we have drawn our- 
selves backward and forward in each of these things. And 
I would like very much, first of all, to review some of the 
highlights of the criticisms that Dan has made. 

On this question of understating radio as opposed to 
television, I think that largely depends upon the individ- 
ual involved as to whether or not we have or have not 
understated an interest in radio measurement. Certainly, 
our general objective was to do two things: first of all, to 
set up general standards which would be applicable to 
over-all national or network operations; second of all, to 
set up standards which would be applicable to the local 
operations regardless of where they are. 

Now, we know this much, that when an average adver- 
tiser spends millions of dollars per year on a program 
through one of the air media on a national basis, his 
stakes are larger than when he spends literally thousands 
of dollars in a local operation. 

There are, of course, a lot of local operations that can- 
not afford the investment in national broadcasting. The 



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I 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



result, therefore, is that the research funds for measure- 
ments in local areas are substantially smaller than they 
are for national ratings. 

Using a rule of reason that the greater your investment 
the greater are your needs for accuracy, it was our gen- 
eral stipulation that we could afford to relax the level of 
accuracy that we need in the local ratings — relax it only 
in one respect — in terms of sample size. In all other re- 
spects, we were just as rigorous in our requirements, we 
think, as we were at the national level. 

Certainly, you can quibble with us all you want to 
whether or not a sample of 400 households locally is an 
adequate sample. We think for practical purposes, for 
most of the measurements that are involved, it is adequate. 
We have, also, set up two escape hatches. One of them 
is that in areas where we have relatively small radio audi- 
ence saturation, particularly some of the local radio opera- 
tions, it is possible to accumulate a number of individual 
ratings to get a larger base, and, therefore, give us aver- 
age estimates of greater reliability. That is not new in the 
industry; it has been done for years by some of the prac- 
titioners. It will tend to give us greater stability over-all, 
provided the samples are well drawn. 

Secondly, we have stipulated what we call, in statistical 
terminology, a random sample. A random sample has a 
couple of very basic hooks in it. It does not mean what 
the unsophisticated think it means. It does not mean a 
sloppy or haphazard sample. It means a sample done ac- 
cording to the very highest levels of research practice in 
which every member of the universe has an equal or 
known probability of being included. 

In doing that, however, it means that you set up in- 
ordinately high standards of research performance on the 
one hand and increase your costs very substantially on the 
other. What it really means is that if you put all the 
households in New York City in a big vase or big vat and 
draw at random one by one until you drew 400 households 
you would have a random sample. If you did that, you 
probably would get one household up on Riverside Drive, 
another one maybe on Park Avenue and 60th Street, an- 
other in Gramercy Park, and so on. You would have to 
do a tremendous amount of work to complete such a 
sample. 

In general practice we know that most research organi- 
zations will not use a random sample. They will, how- 
ever, use a more relaxed method — clustering. In cluster- 
ing, four or five or six households will be interviewed 
within a reasonable area around some centrally desig- 
nated point. All points will be chosen by random processes 
and households chosen by random processes. We know 
statistically that that requires a sample from two to three 
times as large as a random sample! 

So, therefore, when we very naively talk about a sample 
of 400 locally, for practical purposes we mean samples of 
800 to 1,200, implemented at the general level of accuracy 
we stipulated in our report. Therefore, we think in that 
respect that there is more than usual emphasis on getting 
adequate sample sizes for local measurements. 

We are not going to debate whether or not a rating of 
1% on radio should have the same accuracy as a rating of 
15% or 20%. It would be our general submission to you 
that when a rating becomes of that general level (1%), 
other methods must be used for making the evaluation as 
to whether or not the program is worth your while. 

We know, first of all, that unless costs are very low, the 
cost-per-1,000 will be very high, regardless of whether the 
rating is one-half of 1% or 1% or iy 2 %. Therefore, we 
have again some escapes in this general direction. If the 
levels are particularly low, regardless of the sample size, 
you will have to use some other method of deciding what 
you want to do. 

Dan has also raised a very important point on the sub- 
ject of set tuning vs. some other less objective method of 
reporting on exposure to programs. Well, we are interested 
in setting up standards which could be used for measuring 
the total circulation of a program in the universe which 
PAGE 36 we are measuring. We have deliberately denned circula- 



tion to mean set exposure in a household for the reason 
that we have stipulated before. It does not mean, how- 
ever, that within that framework you can't do a lot more 
additional work, if you so desire, more subjectively. 

We are trying to get a measure of the total circulation 
for the particular program, defining "total" as set tuning. 
Whether anybody is there at the time to listen is another 
matter. We submit that this can be done by other tech- 
niques without in any way jeopardizing the value of the 
so-called circulation of the program itself. Once you get 
measures of program circulation, it is no problem at all to 
make some estimate of relationship between set circula- 
tion, program circulation by sets, and exposure of indi- 
viduals within that if you so desire. Since we could not 
agree on a decision outside of the exposure or non-expo- 
sure, that became our general decision. 

We also say that set tuning can be easily handled by 
any known method. My own position is that I don't agree 
with Dan that a diary method cannot give us set tuning. 
Whether there is almost a perfect correlation between set 
tuning and listening we do not know. But we can ask indi- 
viduals answering a diary if a set had been tuned in at a 
particular time. You can still get other information if you 
desire on whether anybody has been exposed to the set at 
that time. So that is no problem in terms of one method 
over another. 

In addition, the general tenor of our report is this, that 
we are making a distinction between, say, the actual re- 
porting of tuning in sets and the human bias involved in 
reporting. We have said in another specification we should 
minimize human errors on reporting and recording. 

Insofar as the human element is involved in errors of re- 
porting and recording on set tuning, that is another prob- 
lem. The point is this; we say set tuning can be obtained 
by any of the methods which we have analyzed. The de- 
gree of accuracy is largely, however, a problem of the 
amount of human error or bias involved which is covered 
by another standard in our general specifications. 

Now, the next point of controversy was the question of 
the unit of measurement being the household. Here was 
cur general thinking on the household. There are some 45 
million households in this country today. Most all pur- 
chases are made within or around the household. The 
evidence that we have is that most of the decisions are 
made by the housewife in the house or by some form of 
joint activity or discussion among a number of members of 
the household. 

Furthermore, most of our statistical thinking is in- 
volved with the household. 

The household gives us a very easy base from which to 
measure all of the circulation of our program, regardless 
of whether it is radio or television or both if we make cer- 
tain exceptions as was done in the report. 

Then Dan raised the question of why did we eliminate 
the institutional listening, exposure to institutional radio, 
such as restaurants, hotels, places of work and so on. 
Well, it was our judgment that we could find no way of 
doing that which would be theoretically sound or worth 
the costs involved. That is, the amount of improvement 
in the estimate, in our judgment, would not be commen- 
surate with the amount of work involved or the cost in- 
volved. Working in a relatively practical world, we decided 
that the marginal or the additional increase in total num- 
ber of sets tuned in would not be worth the additional cost. 
Therefore, that was one important reason why we de- 
cided not to include the institutional listening in audi- 
ence estimates. Certainly we agree that when you tie in 
all exposure to the sets in the household you have some 
underestimating, because you have visitors coming in from 
the outside or you are visiting other households or riding 
in other household's automobile. 

Of course, that works both ways. Therefore, you will 
find in some cases there will be inflation, deflation in 
others. But our general thinking, again, is that if we want 
to designate specifically that the listening or tuning 
should be in terms of household sets, it would be impos- 
sible to reconcile any additional listening of people who 




X7 ftj/tg5 THIS V0j4 A lNf 




t*s^ 




PULSE SURVEY TELEVISION AUDIENCE INDEX 
SHARE OF TELEVISION AUDIENCE NOVEMBER. 1954 


TIME 


TV SETS 
IN USE 


WREX-TV STA b T,on 


ALL 
OTHER TV 


SUNDAY 
12:00 Noon -6:00 P. M. 


35.3°o 


63% 19% 


18% 


SUNDAY 
6:00 P.M. — Midnight 


50.7 % 


66% 


20% 


14% 


MON. THRU FRI. 

10:15— 12:00 Noon 


9.1% 


62% 


* 


38% 


MON. THRU FRI. 

12:00 Noon — 6:00 P.M. 


22.8% 


61% 


21% 


18% 


MON. THRU FRI. 
6:00 P.M. — Midnight 


50.1% 


55% 


24% 


21% 


SATURDAY 

9:30 — 12:00 Noon 


29% 


77% 


*• 


23% 


SATURDAY 

12:00 Noon -6:00 P.M. 


37.7% 


53% 


12% 


35% 


SATURDAY 

6:00 P.M. — Midnight 


54.6% 


64% 


18% 


18% 



WEEKLY AVERAGE SHARE 
AND AVERAGE TUNE-IN 



/ 


■TTL 
NOON 


NOON 
6:00 P. M. 


6:00 P. M. 
MIDNIGHT 


WREX-TV 


69.67% 


59% 


61.67% 


STATION B 





17.3% 


20.67% 


ALL OTHER TV 


30.3% 


23.3% 


17.67% 


AVERAGE '4 HOUR 
HOMES USING TV 


14.5% 


27.13% 


51.59% 



tng a r- ■ 

TV owning nomas Is bads lor 

"TV Sets In Use." 



Jt DESIGNATES STATION 

NON-OPERATIONAL DURING 
TIME SEGMENT 



ALA rules .supremo in tliis rich industrial and agricultural area. 



WREX-TV "fu for a King" Channel ft 



ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS 



ILLINOIS CBS-ABC Network Affiliation 

J. M. BAISCH General Manager 

Represented by H-R TELEVISION. INC. 



11 JULY 1955 



283 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



are not members of the household. In that respect the 
standards are limiting, but we again think that over-all it 
will not be an important loss in general estimates of listen- 
ing for all program types. 

The question of the average instantaneous audience vs. 
the total: We know enough about the dynamics of pro- 
graming to know that even 15-minute programs have sub- 
stantial differences in the accumulating of audiences. We 
wanted audience data for each quarter-hour period. We 
wanted to make these comparable with each other. Also, 
we wanted estimates for the full program, whether it is a 
half hour or an hour long. It was our judgment, therefore, 
that the average instantaneous estimate is a better esti- 
mate over-all, because it will minimize the substantial dif- 
ferences in audience ratings which are based upon differ- 
ences in the way people tune in and out of different types 
of programs. As a case in point, a variety program has a 
greater turnover than, say, a strong drama where the in- 
tensity of interest is maintained throughout. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

Q. Isn't it true that the recorder system already measures 
all sets in the home? 

A. (From Dan Denenholz) The answer to that is obvi- 
ous. No. That's admitted in the report. Every set in the 
home would have to have a recorder attached to it. I 
don't know to what extent that is being done, but the re- 
port says, "The recorder cannot produce estimates of ex- 
posure to all radio sets in the household because it cannot 
measure exposure to battery and portable sets." In other 
words, you need a set, I take it, that is connected to an 
electric current in order to attach the recorder to it. 

Q. With ARF-accepted minimum national sample of 
1.200, how many homes would be included in a city like 
Atlanta? 

A. 'From Max Ule) If we had a true sample done on a 
random basis, the proportion or number that would be put 
in Atlanta would be in true proportion to the Atlanta pop- 
ulation as a ratio to the total United States population of 
households. That would be just automatic within the lim- 
its of sampling fluctuations. There is an automatic way of 
arriving at this figure. Now, however, if you are going to 
use a form of cluster sample, it may be that there wouldn't 
be any Atlanta included in there in the first place: the 
point being that we do not care how many interviews 
there are in Atlanta or in Podunk or any place else: all 
we want is a random sample of the total United States 
household base over-all, reeardless of where they occur, 
because by doing that we know we shall get unbiased esti- 
mates of the total circulation of the particular program, 
regardless of these individual households' locations. 

So therefore, except in a case of wanting to have a spe- 
cial survey in Atlanta, we think it is not important wheth- 
er there are one, two, 10 or 15 interviews in Atlanta. At- 
lanta may be included or excluded, depending upon what 
the loss of probability indicates when we choose a sample 
of households for a particular survey. 

Q. With the heavy premium paid for television for an 
oral and visual impact, don't you think the payoff to an 
advertiser is how many people were consciously exposed to 
a commercial rather than a television set on while the 
person is X feet from the set? 

A. (From Max Ule) I think a lot of that depends upon 
your general philosophy or basic theory about how ad- 
vertising works. There are no agreed-upon hypotheses on 
that score that I know of yet. There is a school of think- 
ing which says that much of our activity is irrational, sub- 
liminal or sub-conscious, and, therefore, because people 
cannot play back mechanically all that they have heard in 
a television commercial, it does not mean that there is no 
residual effect that cumulatively will have some effect upon 
PAGE 37 preference and purchase decisions. It would seem to me 



that there is an awful lot of sense in that particular point 
of view as opposed to the more rational, the more logical 
theory, which is based on conscious exposure. 

Until we have a better knowledge about the real dynam- 
ics of television advertising or any advertising, it is my 
judgment that we are on safer theoretical ground to, first 
of all, measure the total reach of the medium in terms of 
the circulation, and within that framework you can apply 
any hypothesis you desire, depending upon your own pre- 
dilections, your own organized theory of advertising. • • • 



Seminar 



13. 




"THERE'S A RAINBOW IN YOUR FUTURE" 

Speakers: Robert Foreman, vice president and director, 
BBDO; Richard Pinkham, vice president in charge network 
programs, NBC TV, then in charge of participating pro- 
grams. Moderator: Roger Pryor, then president, RTES, 
who is vice president, radio-tv, Foote, Cone & Belding. 



WHAT COLOR TV WILL COST 

ROBERT FOREMAN: I don't know 
whether you know that Miss Beatrice 
Lillie has described television as "Sum- 
mer stock in an iron lung." She was 
talking about the black-and-white ver- 
sion. What she will do when color ar- 
rives I can't say, but I can perhaps ask 
a few questions and I can try and an- 
swer a few. 

Some of the more pertinent ones, for 
example, how much will color television cost for a half- 
hour show on film? Our guides tell me it will cost about a 
third more. 

How much will a half -hour live cost? Some 15 to 25% 
more. 

How much will the one-minute film commercial cost? 
About one-third more. 

So you can see that we are going to have to pay more 
for this thing that is coming along. 

How many sets will there have to be before we can 
achieve a satisfactory cost-per- 1,000? Well, that is not 
an easy answer because we don't actually know what a 
satisfactory cost-per- 1,000 is in black-and-white or any 
other medium, but let's draw conclusions from what we 
are achieving now. 

By the time there are one million color sets out, there 
will be three million more black-and-white sets. Now, let's 
take one of our shows, because I do know the cost. I am 
only taking this as an example. Take the Hit Parade. At 
the time there are one million color sets out there will be 
a cost added to the Hit Parade to do it in color of some 
$15,600. That is the best estimate I can get. That is not 
only a cost of added production but cable costs and so on. 
Our present $6.12 cost-per-1,000 homes will then jump to 
$6.88, but we will be able to reach three million new black- 
and-white homes. More important than that, there will 
be available to us one million homes that can receive color. 

Now, we have to take into consideration how much more 
impact we are throwing against one million color homes 
with our color advertising. That is worth money. How 
much I don't know. 

In addition to that fact, in each one of these color 
homes, and we saw that in black-and-white television, 
there will be more people because they will flock over. I 
happen to have a set, and I am going through the same 
liquor problem I had at the beginning of black-and-white. 
So you will get more people per home when you have color 
at the very beginning. 



POWER 



POWER 

POWER 




OWI 




Power is the only answer for the advertiser who wants 
to get more for his money in 1955-1956 



Within the far-flung limits of influence 

exerted by Atlanta's radio station WSB 

and television station WSB-TV 

are a given number of homes. This is ALL 

the homes there are in this great area. 

Use the power of WSB plus WSB-TV 

and you reach them all. These first stations, 

used individually or as a team, 

give you a lower audience cost per thousand 

than can be obtained on any other 

Georgia station or combination of stations. 

Get more for your money — 

get on WSB and WSB-TV. 




NBC Affiliate. Represented by Petry. Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution 



11 JULY 1955 



285 




TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



PAGE 38 



That, again, will help or tend to offset the added costs. 
Those are factors we all have to consider. 

Now, for some time to come, of course, there will be 
black-and-white television programing side by side with 
color programing. One of the many reasons for that is the 
fact that the people who have made film shows and have 
sold those shows for less than the negative cost — that is, 
for less than it costs to produce them — have done that so 
that they can get their rerun money out and then come 
out with a profit. It will be for that reason as well as other 
reasons that plenty of black-and-white programing will 
appear side by side with color for a long while. 

However, it is my belief that advertisers rather than net- 
works, agencies, package producers, or what have you, will 
force the turn to color television a lot faster than any of 
us can imagine. In other words, as soon as advertisers can 
take advantage of color commercials, they will do that, 
and in turn will necessitate or actually speed up the use 
of color programing. 

Now, this may sound like a reverse twist, but I firmly 
believe that it is advertising that will force the medium 
into color simply because never before in the history of 
marketing, and certainly in the history of advertising it- 
self, has an advertiser ever been offered so much with 
which to reach mass audiences. 

Obvious as this sounds, and is, none of us can fully ap- 
preciate today what it is going to mean when an advertiser 
can have not only the facilities of black-and-white tele- 
vision (that is, use of motion, sight and sound, it is the 
only medium that give you that) but also when you can 
add color to that. 

You are going to see package identification — a very 
mundane thing, but darned important to an advertiser — 
that is lifelike. Remember that today the way your prod- 
uct looks on the shows is not the way you see it on tele- 
vision. Black-and-white is a complete cheat of what the 
actual product looks like. It is a very dull approximation. 
That is just one thing that color can overcome. 

You are going to see products the way they look in use. 
If you can compare black-and-white products such as 
cake and ice cream in black-and-white against what you 
are going to get in color, I think you can see the differ- 
ence that this is going to offer advertisers. 

I have had a color set since April, I believe it is, and 
something that struck most forcibly — other than the price 
of the set — was when my wife saw her first color television 
program. I think it was the Kraft Theater. She and the 
kid sat there and they oohed and aahed, not at the show 
which was wonderful, but when Kraft presented its first 
commercial in color to us. The remarks went like this — 
"Makes me hungry." We had just finished eating. 

As they saw the melted cheese being poured over the 
broccoli, my wife spoke in awe about that, a very simple 
but a very important thing. She said, "That is exactly 
what the Cheez-whiz package looks like." She took the 
time to comment on it. 

If some electronic Michaelangelo had just painted the 
Sistine Chapel, she couldn't have been more awe inspired 
by this silly little package that is on every grocer's shelf. 
But it is important. 

What a tribute that is to color television, and what a 
tremendous value to any advertiser to have the public sit 
there and gape at the realism of a package. All women 
are going to react that way to commercials and the prod- 
ucts sold in commercials for a long, long time to come. 

Many of the problems that an agency and an advertiser 
have to face when they are doing color television are going 
to seem to take us back, and actually will take us back, to 
the beginning of black-and-white. That is a wonderful 
thing, I think, about television. Every one of us can re- 
member the beginnings of black-and-white television. This 
is something that has grown up over night. All that color 
will do is sandwich what happened fast in black-and-white 
into fewer weeks and months than black-and-white did. 

You are going to get the same problems with color we 
had in black-and-white. 

First, you are going to get distortion. We have had it 



already. There will be illegibility of design, name identi- 
fication, and strange abberations. That is why we and 
many other agencies — in fact all of them — are doing a lot 
of color work right now on film — and live — and commer- 
cials, too, in color to work these bugs out. This is an in- 
vestment on our part, and the advertisers just as NBC 
has made an investment, a tremendous investment, in 
the imminent and wonderful future that this thing holds 
for us. 

Here's one of the things we found, and I am sure a lot 
of people have done the same: we had an angel cake on 
color, and the wedge of the cake was out of it as always 
to show the height of the cake. Every place there was a 
shadow, the shadow was green! There will be many prob- 
lems like that. The chocolate icing on the cake looked 
exactly like tar. These are problems that, if we can face 
today, we can lick by the time color is around enough 
to be worthwhile as an advertising medium. If you re- 
member back to black-and-white, we had the same or 
similar problems. 

We used a girl on one show who had a dress on — I can 
attest to this — and it didn't look like she had a dress on. 
Color did that. We have got to be very careful. 

We have found that color copy requires far more sim- 
plicity than anything we have ever done in black-and- 
white, that backgrounds, for example, just by the very fact 
that they are in color, tend to distract. So we have got to 
keep things much more simple, and the center of interest 
has to be a real center of interest even in contrast to what 
you can do in black-and-white. 

There are going to be a lot of problems. However, once 
we can make use of color, there is no limit to what good 
advertising can achieve, and whatever the added price is 
going to be — and I just gave you some rough figures, and 
they are pure guesses — it is my feeling, and that of a lot 
of people, that the cost will be of little consequence com- 
pared to the added values in the realism and the drama 
and the impact which color is going to provide. 

Recently I saw an Oldsmobile commercial. That is a 
competitive account, so I shouldn't even mention it. It was 
a series of two-tone blue Oldsmobiles reeling off one right 
after another across the screen. I don't know what the 
audio was. However, it was the most beautiful sight I ever 
saw. It made you want to do that. Black-and-white auto- 
mobiles are pretty darn dull in television. They all look 
alike. It is very hard to differentiate between one and the 
other. You do all sorts of stunts. We run them in the 
ocean on the Groucho show. We have helicopters looking 
down at them. However, when you add color to it, you are 
going to get the same kind of appeal that the car has on 
the showroom floor, and when you can do that, then you 
are really selling. 

I saw Hit Parade in color twice. It was pretty darn 
effective, just tremendous. In the middle of the show we 
took a trip to the tobacco fields, and those fields were just 
— you cannot compare the two. 

Now just over the horizon — and it is not a distant hori- 
zon — is a thing called video tape, which is exactly like 
sound tape, except for the fact that it shows pictures. 
• See "Video Tape: programing revolution on the horizon" 
sponsor, 21 March 1955, page 42.) 

Tape will do away with all the involved laboratory 
processes and expensive time delaying things that we have 
to face today. You will go into a studio and you will shoot 
something and play it back instantly. If you don't like it, 
you will erase it, just as you do on a sound tape. Repro- 
ductions from that are absolutely perfect because they are 
electronic, which is not true of the present film reproduc- 
tion. This is a tremendous thing, and it is a black-and- 
white facility, but it is also a color facility. It is much 
cheaper than anything we are doing today, fast, wonderful. 

I want to read you, if I may, a memorandum on this 
that came not out of Mars or tomorrow but out of the 
past, 22 October of this past year. It was sent to me from 
our Coast office on 27 October. "Thought you might be 
interested in knowing that Crosby Enterprises took the 
Bob Crosby show (CBS does that, too) of 22 October color- 




*v 



*fq£? «R> 



f 



t 7 * 

i 



By keeping tuned to the heart of New York, 
WRCA and WRCA-TV ensure a neighborly 
reception for every sales message they carry. 

Take the recent contest to select an 
honorary bat boy for the Dodgers and 
Giants. By the time the contest closed, 12,000 
boys had written compositions titled 
"Why I Want to Be Bat Boy for the 
(Dodgers or Giants)." 50.000 fans saluted 
the winners on special WRCA Days at 
Ebbets Field and the Polo Grounds. 
And hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers 
cheered from the sidelines, as they watched 
and listened to the winners during their 
many on-the-air appearances. 

WRCA and WRCA-TV's community 
promotions always have one sure result: 
they make New Yorkers good friends of the 
stations and good customers for the stations' 
advertisers. 

By participating in these community 
promotions. WRCA and WRCA-TV 
program-personalities arc solidly established 
as the warmest, friendliest people in town. 
And that's why we always say . . . PEOPLE 
MAKE THE BEST SALESMEN! 



LURCH radio B60 



im-TV-4 




in New ^ ork 

Rrprrscnted by NBCSpot Sales 

NEW YORK . CHICAGO • DETROIT • CLEVELAND 
WASHINGTON • SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES 
CHARLOTTE' . ATLANTA' • DALLAS' 



11 JULY 1955 



287 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



cast off the air on their new video tape process. The cost 
of doing same amounted to the rediculous figure of $28, 
and according to Crosby and our director, results were 
terrific. Believe it or not, they took the show off a home 
color receiver, so you can imagine what it might have 
looked like had they been doing it professionally and 
taken it right off the line. They said that our General 
Mills products looked beautiful and that the color was 
extremely true. I have asked to see this, as I think it would 
be extremely educational as well as exciting. 

"According to Crosby, now that the Army has given 
them the go-ahead on video tape (this, by the way, is Bing 
Crosby) they are really going to town. Rumor has it that 
color prints will average about $8 per half-hour show (I 
understand it is a little higher, but not much) and black- 
and-white about $3.50. . . ." and so on, but that is the 
thing that is fabulous. In color, tape will save us a lot 
of time and give us great reproduction qualities. 

Now, where will the new money for color tv come from? 
I think it is going to come from out of increased budgets. 
I think advertisers never realized that they would have to 
increase their budgets to get in black-and-white television, 
but if you look at any of the accounts you work on and 
carry back five or six years when they were worried about 
a radio show costing $12,000, somehow they have done it. 
True, the country is doing well, the entire economy is up, 
and so forth. Maybe it is inflation to a degree. However, 
I think advertisers will acclimate themselves to the in- 
creased budgets necessary for color. 

However, I am also sure and others in the trade are, 
too, that a lot of it is going to come out of the color plates 
in the magazines. Magazines for a long while have been 
trying to knock television and their own stronghold has 
been the fact that they can reproduce things in color. 

I think that color tv is the greatest thing that has ever 
hit the adverising business. Advertisers can only welcome 
the added facility and the wonderful selling tool that color 
is going to bring to us. All I can say is that we as one 
agency welcome color television, and the sooner the bet- 
ter. And we are going to help it get here all we can. 



HOW WELL SELL COLOR TV 

RICHARD PINKHAM: Color television 
is coming fast, and it is coming faster 
than 90% of the advertising business 
and 99% of the publishing business 
wishfully predict. It is coming with an 
express train speed that is only starting 
to pick up momentum now with the 
arrival of the 21 -inch color television 
sets. 
There are now more than 35,000,000 
television sets in this country. Seven years ago there were 
16,000. It took 17 years for there to be 30,000,000 radio 
sets in American homes and 36 years for there to be 30,- 
000,000 electric refrigerators. I don't know how many 
years it will be before there are 30,000,000 color tv sets 
but I'll predict that it will take less time than it took radio. 
Because good as black-and-white television is, color tele- 
vision is infinitely better. In fact, to be dramatic, we are 
presently living like dogs. Dogs, as you know, only see in 
varying shades of gray. They cannot see color at all. This 
may account for the woebegone expression on most dogs' 
faces. Think how much more enticing a good steak bone 
would be to Fido if he could actually see the bright red 
color. And the same is going to be true for people in color 
television. 

Because to see color is to want it. Those of you who 
have seen shows in color I am sure will agree that it is 
compelling for the simple reason that color shows you 
things as they are. The screen suddenly reveals reality. 
We are so used to having reality filtered out through the 
smoked glass of black-and-white movies and television 
PAGE 39 that we forget how really great reality is. With color, you 




see what is there. It even gives you a certain 3-D quality 
because of the spatial relationship. Color helps to add to 
that. It enables you to see all products better. 

Because it does so, the statement of an advertising 
agency president recently makes real sense. He said, "We 
are about to have ready for our use the perfect advertising 
medium. Sight, sound, and demonstration in full color." 

I think not quite perfect. We won't have the perfect 
advertising medium until television is also able to take 
orders electronically from the living room. 

And this is quite possible, too. You may have heard the 
new word "center-casting." By installing a small gadget 
in each television set which transmits a tiny radio impulse, 
a central reception point can easily collect all sorts of dif- 
ferent information from each set so equipped. What show 
is being watched, how the audience likes the show, and 
eventually perhaps it will be possible to sign on the dotted 
electronic line and order the product advertised without 
moving from an easy chair. A machine called "Ultrafax," 
which can scan Gone With The Wind in 90 seconds, will 
be able to take down all the orders regardless of the 
volume. 

When this device is ready and is built into every tv set 
sold, perhaps at no extra cost to the consumer since the 
advertiser and the network would benefit so much by its 
presence in the home, then, indeed, color tv will be the 
perfect advertising medium. The imagination boggles at 
what this will do to the orthodox marketing patterns. 

Let me get right to the point: programs, what will they 
be and who is going to pay for them and how? 

I think the programs are going to be great, much better 
than they were in black-and-white, much better than they 
are in movie form as put out by Hollywood. I think they 
are going to be expensive, and I think that national adver- 
tisers are going to fight to pay for them. I agree with Bob 
Foreman that it is going to hurt magazines, because that 
is the one place presently you can go for color. I think it 
may even limit newspapers largely to local ad revenue. 

I further believe that color television will be so effective 
that money spent presently on salesmen on the road selling 
in person will be channeled out of the sales department 
budget and into the advertising budget. I finally believe 
that color television will help explode the United States 
economy to productive heights that seem impossible today. 

I believe that the expense of color will be adjusted to, 
just as the rising costs of black-and-white television are 
being adjusted to. Look at the situation today. Television 
is fantastically expensive by radio standards. 

The Milton Berle show, Caesar's Hour, The Colgate 
Comedy Hour cost about $160,000 per broadcast, time and 
talent. The same is true of the big shows on CBS. And 
some of the NBC spectaculars are costing as much as 
$300,000 for a single broadcast, and Peter Pan came to 
$400,000, which is the equivalent of a full-fledged Broad- 
way musical comedy. 

These black-and-white costs which must be borne by the 
advertiser are not going down either. They are going up. 
As more stations are added to the basic line-ups of net- 
works, as union scales continue to rise, as prices demanded 
by the performers increase, it is completely conceivable 
that within five years the cost of a full-hour show on one 
of the major networks, coast to coast live television, will 
be $250,000 a week — and be worth every penny of it. And 
when color is added, you have got to add at least 10%. 

I rather challenge Bob's figures of 25 and 33%, but more 
of that later perhaps. 

Now how many advertisers are going to be able to af- 
ford that even in black-and-white? When network radio 
was in its heyday, it was dominated by the blue-chip ad- 
vertisers who could afford to spend millions of dollars a 
year in that one medium and still have enough left over 
to conduct their necessary campaigns in other media. In 
1948, for example, just eight advertisers accounted for one- 
third of the total radio network billing for the year. It 
was almost impossible for a new advertiser to find a de- 
cent time slot on any network because the big boys were 
in there so heavily that there just wasn't any room. 



KCOR-TV 



SAN ANTONIO 




Raoul A. 
famous I' 



■Mm of K( oh S 

i ril. r I .1 in in. nl v| n r« 



DHS, i- -lnM.il wirh 

KCOR-TV inaugural. 



America's First Spanish-Language 
Television Station 

B\ RAOl L \. I 0R1 l / 

June II) was a red letter day in and around San 
Antonio. For on that date the 50', of the popu 
lation that speaks Spanish got their own television 
station. 

Their enthusiasm is beyond description. By June 
15 a survey showed 32,800 conversions and t\ 
set sales — all due to the advent of KCOK 1\, 
Channel 41. By July 15 the estimate is 50,000. 
Why do Latin Americans of South Texas open their 
homes to a Spanish-language tv station: If you 
have advertised over KCOR AM or other radio 
stations dow r n this way you know that their appre- 

rciation for air communications is truly phenomenal. 
1 .- '--'^B ' * ^Wv < \vV«*'* ^' K l l- :ltm Americans have been waiting a long time 

» - '"''' for the air medium that combines sight and sound. 

You can expect outstanding results from Spanish 
language television advertising. 
Housed in a half-million dollar television building, 
equipped throughout by RCA, with the highest tow- 
er in the San Antonio area, KCOR-TV is designed to be now, and henceforth, the Spanish language leader 
in the tv field. KCOR-TV emphasizes novelty in its programming approach. Bullfights, news, and vari 
ety films are rushed from Mexico City j live entertainment by leading artists of Mexico, Spain, Portugal, 
and the V. S. takes up a good part of the program day ; local and public service events are spot covered 
with a fresh approach. 

My advice — keep your eye on Spanish-language tv and KCOR-TV. And don't hesitate to 
write me or Dick O'Connell about availabilities. 

KCOR-TV 

^^^^I^l^RKET FACTS 1 Eg KCOR- AM 

l\tin-^ r ^antonio | LdtA San Antonio 

1 " \\G ORDF R 9l< ^ 111 /6 /, V , | RH-iu-iMin NATIOIUIXI m 

BAWBOMEB^W'^&ATOB Jjg 111 >€^ RICHARD O'CONNELl 

„ WE MEC1I .v>l U -,„ N K -• - ,, 2 -, 

„.U WASBB«" ' ,„, TRUCK 

Vxv. M i-' 1 "^' , roMom... 62* 



289 





11 JULY 1955 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



Television started off the same way. The biggest adver- 
tisers moved in first, gained priority on the prime time, 
and the smaller advertisers were either frozen out com- 
pletely or had to spend more money than they could af- 
ford, because they had to use the new glamor medium to 
build up enthusiasm in their sales and distributive organi- 
zations or lose out in the market place. 

Television has changed rapidly and very dramatically in 
the last few years. If the same eight advertisers who" ac- 
counted for one-third of the radio billing in 1948 were to 
dominate television in the same way, they would need a 
combined appropriation of over $300 million a year in- 
stead of the $60 million they spent to dominate radio. 
Obviously, even they cannot afford that kind of money. 

Consequently, the alternating sponsorship that you are 
all familiar with; consequently, the participating princi- 
ple like NBC's Today, Home and Tonight, the magazine 
concept. I believe that the same solution we applied to 
black-and-white television can also be applied, and, in 
fact, will be forcibly applied to color television. I think 
that only the few big advertisers who can buy an hour's 
worth of time a week and $150,000 worth of show and 
broker it among four or five different products and divi- 
sions will be able to afford color in the orthodox radio half- 
hour and one-hour pattern. All the rest of the color pro- 
grams, I think, will be sold on a participating basis, just 
like Today. 

In addition, we may have 10-second announcements, 20- 
second and 30-second network announcements. We will 
have available all-night spectaculars in color. We will also 
have seasonal saturation campaigns which you can buy to 
fit your marketing pattern. We may even have for sale 
five-second color billboards which will compete, I think, 
quite successfully with the 24-sheet outdoor billboards 
which get about five seconds' notice as you drive by. 

Now, the conservative advertising man will continue to 
rebel at the idea of not owning his own television show. 
What about the gratitude factor, he will keep saying until 
the day he retires; what about the identification of the 
star with his product? 

Well, the gratitude factor must be analyzed thoroughly 
before you get to know how much you really dislike it. The 
philosophy behind the gratitude factor is that the audi- 
ence, enjoying the show, will be moved by pure gratitude 
to buy the product advertised, not by the persuasive copy, 
not by the illuminating demonstration, not because they 
are convinced, but because they are grateful. 

That I submit is not a strong enough motivation to get 
people to spend money. I submit that the advertising men 
who cling to the gratitude factor don't have the courage 
of their convictions that they can move people to buy with 
logic and salesmanship. 

On the other hand, identification of star with product 
is a much more important and vital subject. The answer 
to that one, for my money, lies in the one word, merchan- 
dising. I think that the broadcast media got into some 
pretty bad habits during the lush years of radio and dur- 
ing the first standing-room-only years of television. We 
kind of lost sight of the basic relationship between media 
and the client. We were in such a strong position in the 
networks that with virtually no time left to sell, we didn't 
have to sell. We didn't have to help make the advertising 
campaigns work. If we were able to make a time period 
available to an advertiser, he was one of the lucky ones. 
We had done him a big favor. From here on the success 
of the campaign was his problem. 

Well, I believe that color television is going to force back 
into the awareness of networks and agencies and adver- 
tisers alike the real importance of merchandising at point- 
of-sale. 

I believe that more and more of the big stars of tele- 
vision will be giving their own commercials, lending their 
own personal endorsements to give conviction to the ad- 
vertising message. This is a healthy trend which I think 
PAGE 40 wil1 continue as we go into high-cost color production. But 



this endorsement by the star has got to be carried to its 
logical conclusion to really pay off. Of what use is it to 
spend hundreds of thousands and even millions of dol- 
lars a year on advertising if, at what the Spanish call the 
"Moment of Truth," the moment when the matador kills 
the bull, the moment when the customer decides between 
two competitive products, there is no visual reminder 
which says "Buy this product. Remember, it is the one 
George Gobel told you about." 

If this opportunity is missed, the advertiser is only get- 
ting part of the potential efficiency of the advertising cam- 
paign. Television, and particularly color television, is 
uniquely equipped to give glamor to point-of-sale mer- 
chandising. 

This then is the way I believe we will be able to sell 
color television, regardless of how expensive it is. By sell- 
ing it in participations, by broadening the base so that 
even small advertisers will be able to take advantage of 
the enormous consumer and point-of-sale impact of this 
great medium. 

How soon, you ask? Well, there are presently about 15,- 
000 color sets in use. Nobody seems to be very much 
interested in buying 15-inch sets at $500 apiece. However, 
the 21-inch set is here. In addition, over 10 million black- 
and-white sets will be five years old this year and getting 
obsolescent. A lot of these owners will be sorely tempted 
to spend the extra money to get color. RCA predicts that 
by 1958 there will be 10 million color sets. I think this is a 
conservative estimate. I think color sets will snowball. 

Just wait until the baseball games are in full color, or 
the football games, with the green grass and the bright 
uniforms. You'll see them this fall. 

All very well for 1958, you may say, but what of the 
years between now and then. That is a tough one. The 
period immediately at hand presents us with the same 
problem identically that television had in black-and-white 
in 1949. We had to sell advertisers on using television at 
once rather than waiting for additional circulation, rather 
than waiting until the slide-rule boys came back and said, 
"Now it's a good buy." And just as in those days, those 
who decide to wait for circulation, those who decide to 
wait for cost-per- 1,000 are going to miss the boat, because 
an advertiser's color television campaign will determine 
more than anything else his share of the market in color 
television homes. These will be the homes of the leaders 
in each community whose influence is felt on down the 
line. This is starting on a small scale now, and for those 
companies which need effective advertising to survive, par- 
ticularly packaged trademarked brand items, the time to 
start color television is now, while color is still very much 
of a conversation piece, and the place to get the money is 
from management as extra budgets to insure that the 
company learns how to use at once the most vital selling 
force in history. 

In addition, many such advertisers' success depends on 
the elan, the spirit, the enthusiasm of his selling, dealer 
and distributor organizations. The only way to win en- 
thusiasm from his phlegmatic group who have long been 
blase about contests and bonuses and big prizes is to do 
something dramatic, exciting and new, and there is simply 
nothing more dramatic and exciting and new than color 
television, and companies who have used it and those who 
will use it are finding out how effective this kind of en- 
thusiasm can be. 

Far-sighted advertising men recognize that color tele- 
vision will make new leaders in many categories of mar- 
keting. Black-and-white has already changed some white- 
chip products into the bluest of the blue. Whoever heard 
of Hazel Bishop five years ago? And color television will 
accelerate this change of leadership to the detriment of 
the big conservative companies who stand back from the 
new medium because it looks like an expensive luxury. 

So my position is a very simple one. I think color tele- 
vision is coming, and coming fast. I think it will be ex- 
pensive. I think the expense will be worth it. I think that 



(g2j 



TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 



color television will be Bold primarily on I participating 
basis. I think that the smart media men amongst the 
advertising agencies recognize that in color television. Jusl 
as to a certain extent it is true in black-and-white tele- 
vision, the Important thing la not the cost; the important 
thing is not even the cost-per-1,000; the important thing 
is the cost-per-sale. 

QUESTIONS AND ANSVWIO 



Q. Will advertisers be able to use one half or a full hour's 
time on television time in black-and-white and still have 
their commercials in color, or will the webs force full 
color programing? 

A. (From Bob Foreman' I am not competent to say 
what the webs will force. However, I am fairly sure there 
will be colored commercials in many black-and-white 
shows, because for that little bit of difference in the com- 
mercial you can reach the people who have color sets with 
color copy and do a better job on them, while your show is 
in black-and-white. I cannot see any reason during this 
transition stage why we wouldn't have commercials in 
color ahead of a lot of color programing. I don't know 
what your rule would be. I doubt if you would be faced 
with that problem. 

(From Dick Pinkham) We are not going to force any- 
body. 

Q. Why are there still so many good black and white 
movies? 

A. <From Bob Foreman ) Well, in the first place, I would 
draw no conclusion whatsoever about the advertising busi- 
ness from what I see, from what you see, or all of us see in 
large-screen motion pictures. In the first place, there 
are very many fewer in black-and-white. If you have 
noticed it, the trend is to color today in the big-screen 
releases. You are going to see more and more of it as 
television moves into color. They are going to be forced 
to do it. However, there is nothing comparable, because 
you don't have commercials in big-screen releases, and the 
commercials are the things that a sponsor is spending 
money for. Therefore, he will want to get into color. 

Q. Why has color set production failed to reach pre- 
dicted figures? 

A. (From Dick Pinkham) I am no engineer. My connec- 
tion with RCA is a tenuous one, even temporary. I think 
the main problem is a production problem in that in the 
color tube the rejections ran as high as 66 %. In other 
words, one out of three is good enough to include in the 
set, the other two have to be thrown away. As soon as that 
bug is successfully ironed out, which, I understand, is hap- 
pening in the new 21 -inch tube, then they will be coming 
off the production line a lot more quickly. 

Q. What additional charges will be made for color fa- 
cilities? 

A. (From Dick Pinkham) From a network point of view, 
the basic additional cost is in the facilities. The line cost 
for color television, the actual cable, is very little more. 
The costs of production, its facility costs, depend so heav- 
ily on the show itself. Some shows will be almost the same 
price production-wise as in black-and-white, others like 
the Hit Parade, which is a classic example, will be very 
expensive from the color point of view, running as high 
as 25 <7 more. So that when you average it out time-and- 
talent, the total increase will be about 1C;. 

Somebody who spends $1 million in black-and-white can 
have the same campaign in color for about $1,100,000. 



quency, too I don't think i i ike 

that ah i know is that there will 

and the cost will be higher Bo you will b 

frequency to achieve what you did before n •• •■ i 

the other i -uy moves In, you are going to have to step up 

your old frequency, and the ral race begin ai 

Q. Will they increase the commercial time pel bOUl 
help reduce the cost -per- 1.000? 

A. 'From Dick Pinkham I I do not think the numbe: 
commercial minutes per hour will be increased. All • 
pressure L In the other direction After all, : 

are at the mercy of the affiliated . tations. They are VI 
very adamant on that point. I think they will stay the 
ame aa far as color television is concerned. 

Q. What are the all-night spectaculars you mentioned 
earlier. Dick? 

A. (From Dick Pinkham) I believe that we will get away 
from predictable schedules eventually, and something like 
this mieht occur: that every night of the week t 
assigned to a different producer. You mi<:ht have LHand 
Hayward on Monday, Josh Logan on Tuesday, Max Lieb- 
man on Wednesday, and a lot of people's names who 
haven't come up as yet. On Monday ni- ht the advertisers 
would have enough faith in Leland Hayward's ability to 
attract a big audience just as they have enoueh faith in 
the editor of the Saturday Eveni»u Post to attract a big 
audience. So they would buy into Monday ni -ht without 
even knowing what the program is going to be. It mi 
be something like this. The first 11 minutes mieht be 
ton Berle. the next hour and a half micht be the Sad: 
Wells Ballet, followed by a prize fight. The following 
Monday nieht it might be a bullfight in color direct from 
Madrid, followed by a dramatic show, followed by Meet* 
the Press. You wouldn't know from week to week. These, 
I submit, would be spectaculars in color. 

Q. Do you believe that the traditional package designs 
will be changed to benefit by color television? 
A. (From Bob Foreman) Yes, definitely, because there 
has been a tremendous change made since black-and-white 
television came into the picture. I can remember six years 
ago when we had a package with 16 lines of type telling 
you how to use it on the front of the carton, and the name 
was in a thin script that couldn't be picked up. We 
changed it. Certainly, in color the same thing will happen. 
You are going to have to do an awful lot of playing around 
with your packages to accommodate color television just 
as we did in black-and-white, and even more so. * * * 



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Q. Will the added impact of color television permit the 
advertiser to have less frequency in television and still 
maintain his competitive marketing position? 
A. (From Bob Foreman) Well, it depends. If his com- 
petitor moves into color, then you have to up your fre- 



availahle: TV. Film and Radio Basics 



PAGE 41 



HI880CK.TEWS 
market vie 

KDUB-TV 

'(MAXIMUM) 




•602,900,000 POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS 
$1,021,361,000 ANN. BUYING INCOME 
$685,156,000 ANNUAL RETAIL SALES 



The Lubbock market, consisting of thirty-eight oil 
end cotton-rich counties, is COMPLETELY covered 
by KDUB-TV. Channel 13's tremendous power in- 
crease combined with Lubbock's rapid growth 
gives you these increases over lost years cover- 
age data: 

•Population up — 156,200 
Retoil Sales up - $137,492,000 
Buying Income vp — $265,622,000 

"MORE VIEWERS PER DOLLAR THAN ANY OTHER 
TEXAS TELEVISION" 

•S.M. 1955 



KDUB-TV 

LUBBOCK, TEXAS 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: AVERYKNODEl, INC. 



PRESIDENT AND GEN. MGR., W. D. "DUB" ROGERS 
GEORGE COLLIE, NAT'l. SALES MGR. 



REP ADVICE 

{Continued from page 53) 

vision continues its unprecedented, 
fabulous development as the most ef- 
fective advertising medium yet devel- 
oped, and the advent of color on a 
wider basis this fall will give new ac- 
celeration to this phenomenon. Radio 
is being rediscovered as the most eco- 
nomical and highly efficient mass me- 
dium. 

By contrast, print costs continue to 
rise and their values to fall. If sub- 
jected to measurements half as critical 
as those applied to the broadcast me- 
dia, I doubt if half the print campaigns 
now running could survive. 

My best fall buying tip to adver- 
tisers, therefore, would be to put their 
promotional dollars where they will go 
farthest — in radio — and where they 
will be most effective — in television. 

Scott Donahue, sales manager for tv, 
The Katz Agency: Alert agencies can 
improve their clients' positions by se- 
curing approval of tv markets, budgets 
and commercials before August for 
fall placements. In past years most 
buyers of fall tv time have scrambled 
for their schedules simultaneously 
from August to mid-September, pro- 
ducing delays and compromises in 
clearances and confirmations. While 
the 30-day confirmation rule is partly 
responsible for this congestion, there 
are two steps that can be taken by 
agencies to improve their fall time- 
buying effectiveness: 

1. Make definite budget provisions 
for advance starting dates. The ability 
to advance a starting date by as little 
as two weeks can make an enormous 
difference in the quality of the sched- 
ule obtained when buying competition 
is heavy. 

2. Let the representative know in 
advance when you are going to buy 
and what you intend to buy. The rep- 
resentative can alert his stations to 
your upcoming needs and both will 
have a chance to watch for opportuni- 
ties to fill your prescription. While 
no concrete "priorities" can be offered 
in most cases, advance information to 
the representative of what you want 
and when you will want it will pay off 
in better results for the advertiser. 

Sidney J. Wolf, president, Keystone 
Broadcasting System: Recently one of 
our clients conducted a survey in Key- 



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■tone towns. This survej revealed that 
people listen to th<i r borne town sta- 
tion and depend on it for sews, local 
events, and mi. rtainment 

This stud) showed thai ratings in 
our type of markets averaged 13.4 in 
multiple station markets, and that in 
single station markets, these rating! 
actuall] rose to an average of 19.1. 
All of tin- stations surveyed were with- 
in i\ covei age areas. 

I bis stud] is available to advertis- 
ers and tluir agencies. 

Rafter. Meeker, president, Robert 
Meeker fasoc.: An often quoted re- 
mark of Mark Twain's was t<> the effect 
that everyone talks about the weather, 
liit aobod) does anything about it. 

\\ illi all respect to the thousands of 
words written, spoken and quoted re- 
cently about the fundamental value of 
radio, not enough agency people have 
put their opinions into radio contracts. 
Quoting again — and who doesn't — 
Emerson once said that reform never 
becomes general until it becomes a 
private opinion. When buyers of ra- 
dio time become privately convinced 
of the tremendous sales value of radio, 
they will start again to translate it into 
orders. Theory is wonderful — but or- 
ders are better. The faith that indus- 
try once had in radio years ago, and 
the sales volume that radio created, 
made it possible for this same industry 
to have enough money available today 
to invest it in radio's younger brother, 
television. The golden egg that radio 
put — not laid — in the nest is being 
hatched today. But never forget that 
where there's an egg, there was a 
rooster. 

There is little need of giving tips on 
television spot buying today — it is a 
problem only of getting acceptable 
time. 

Tom MvFttdden, v.p.-director, NBC 
spot sales: During 1955-56, more tv 
stations and advertisers will be using 
eight-second station I.D.'s. The advan- 
tages offered by the eight-second I.I), 
over the conventional 10-second shared 
announcement are many: The audi- 
ence's attention is focused exclusively 
on the advertiser's message; greater 
flexibility of art work: and lower pro- 
duction costs. A new specifications 
book, soon to be issued by NBC Spot 
Sales, will provide full details. 

Further, many more advertisers will 
be saturating close to 100% of their 
prospective customers by taking ad- 




Portland Grad Works in Film 



Ever »lnrr hi* p radii al Ion from N..r 1 d v. » l 

Radio i I. I-*. M.n School'* Portland Btssttaf 

nln«- month* OfO, * »lto A Urn ha- b— ■ ork- 
lOg .,, I ilm llinr.tor for \* k N \ - I \ In 
■T, M i< hiuan. 

Broadcasters, sajanelao, and productftoa 
eoBBpanlai all aras Ism country art* lading 

I Illinois', |»r of r-.-lonally-t rained gradualm 
liUr Olio arr Mtring lli.rn botll BMaOJ and 

linn . Lai BJ help you by rrfrrring qualified 
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Box 141 - Spokane, Wash 



11 JULY 1955 



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ST. LOUIS 
LOS ANCELES 



ADAM YOUNC |R. 



vantage of the tremendous cumulative 
audiences which spot radio offers. 
Saturation advertising will become the 
basic buying pattern; the days of the 
two or five announcements per week 
buying pattern are definitely gone. 

John E. Pearson, John E. Pearson 
Co.: I suggest that advertisers and 
agencies take a good, long look at 
local personality programs on all sta- 
tions. Surveys show that this local 
programing far out-pulls the network. 

However, I would recommend that 
these local personalities be considered 
in all time segments. The 7-8:00 a.m. 
slot is not the only high tune-in period 
on radio. Radio costs are low in com- 
parison to rates for other media. Ad- 
vertisers should consider using radio 
with great frequency, since they can 
do this with a limited budget. 

Frequently, advertisers restrict them- 
selves to the use of minute announce- 

• ••••••• 

"Broadcasting is a force in its com- 
munity, not alone because it delivers 
the news, and fair comment upon it, 
not only because it entertains and edu- 
cates, but also because it has a con- 
science that is in tune with its home 
town. Any broadcaster who places a 
higher value upon economic progress 
than upon that 'conscience with the 
community' will not prosper very long." 
HAL FELLOWS 
President 
1SARTB 

• ••••••• 

ments. They overlook the great po- 
tential of program buys. Personality 
shows can be bought on most stations 
in five-, 10- or 15-minute segments. 
The five-minute newscast too is an out- 
standing buy. A check of most rate 
cards will prove that a five-minute 
newscast can be bought for only slight- 
ly more than a minute announcement, 
and the impact and merchandising 
possibilities are infinitely greater. 

Lloyd G. Venord, president Venard, 
Rintoul & McConnell: In time of pros- 
perity, advertising dollars compete not 
only with competitive products but for 
dollars that might be spent for other 
items. Therefore, market study is in- 
creasingly important. Rely increasing- 
ly on district sales managers and food 
brokers for market conditions as well 
as for relative strength of tv and am 
stations in markets. District sales man- 
agers know market conditions and sta- 
tion dominance six to eight months 
ahead of published surveys. Decline 
of network station popularity and in- 




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• n lasing Dumber of t\ stations plus 
switching <>f networks in iv requires 
real market analysis nol from l>o«ik- 

hut froiii tin- market itself. 

»i uthr Wmikmr, preeidenl Walkei 
Representation I o. : M\ suggested 
"buying t ■ | > is to radio station own- 
era. I suggest the) don't "buy" net- 
work encroachmenl in national — j » « »t 
Bales, Fall appropriations will be f:ood. 
How much of them go to the stations 
rests entire!) with the stations. No sta- 
tion <'.m have its cake and let tin- net- 
works eat it. 

I hope tv stations never "buy" the 
idea <>f becoming an nutlet for net- 
work encroachment in national spot. 
["here's no sense in giving awa) what 
the) used to sell. 

J. J. Weed, president. Weed Tele- 
vision Corp.: Radio and television are 
both tremendously powerful media. In 
spite of the fact that they both use 
the magic of electronics to reach the 
puMic, they are very different from 
each other. They are different in their 
impact upon the listener or viewer, 
they are different in the techniques 
which must be used to secure the best 
results and they certainly vary in cost. 

My suggestion, therefore, is that ad- 
vertisers and their agencies separate 
radio and television in their thinking, 
look to each for the type of results 
each individually is uniquely capable 
of and plan their advertising approach 
and expenditure accordingly. 

Adam J. Young, Jr., president. 
Adam J. Young, Jr. : The best buying 
tip I can pass on to accounts for this 
fall's buying is to make plans well in 
advance of the starting date. It ap- 
pears that the more important tele- 
vision and radio stations are going to 
have very tight schedules during the 
coming fall season and I believe the 
advertisers who get in there first are 
going to be able to do better than 
those who wait too long. 

I think that most advertisers and 
agency people realize how difficult it 
i- going to be to buy good television 
time during the coming fall but I 
strongly suspect that few realize that 
it is going to be almost as tough to 
buy good radio time. 

My advice, therefore, i- to make 
plans early and buy time as early as 
the stations will accept orders. * * * 



Muncie, 




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They really go for TV in Mun- 
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cities by the American Research 
Bureau. The average Muncie 
family spends 31 Vi hours per 
week watching television . . . 
more hours per week than any 
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Muncie according to the No- 
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CBS-NBC-DUMONT-ABC NETWORKS 




CHANNEL 



MUNCIE, INDIANA 



11 JULY 1955 



295 



WSAU-Tv 



WAUSAU, WISCONSIN 



ABC • DuMont 



CHANNEL 7 

100,009 watts 

1,921ft. above sea level 
540,000 population 

$662,899,000 

spendable income 
152,000 homes 

Represented by 
MEEKER, TV. 

New York, Chi., Los Angeles, San Fran. 



Stockholders Include 
RADIO STATIONS: 

WSAU - WFHR - WATK 
NEWSPAPERS: 

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Marshficld News Herald 
Wis. Rapids Daily Tribune 
Merrill Daily Herald 
Rhinelander Daily News 
Antigo Daily Journal 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY 

WISCONSIN VALLEY TELEVISION CORP. 



NETWORK ADVICE 

[Continued from page 48) 

these broadcasts is spectacular. Other 
clients, on the other hand, still choose 
to buy radio by the hour or half hour, 
in order to create a special atmosphere 
in which to do their selling. This was 
one of the major considerations be- 
hind the new Woolworth Hour on CBS 
Radio Sunday afternoons. 

In radio, as in any medium, the ad- 
vertiser must interest the customer, 
and this means having good commer- 
cials as well as good programs. Grant- 
ed, radio is inexpensive. But this is 
no reason for commercials to be in- 
expensive. They should be every bit 
as imaginative as those prepared for 
the most costly television program. 
They should be as carefully written as 
those prepared for the most expensive 
lour-color magazine spread. 

The major trend in selling today 
seems to be diversity. It is no longer 
fashionable, or even practicable, to 
concentrate on one medium at the ex- 
pense of others. We have been accus- 
tomed to thinking of the automobile 
companies, for example, as "newspaper 
advertisers." Yet today all the major 
manufacturers are represented not just 
in newspapers but in magazines, tele- 
vision and in network radio. Even ad- 
vertisers who have literally built their 
companies in one medium, today are 
beginning to branch out. Hazel Bishop 
created one of the nation's largest cos- 
metic firms by using virtually nothing 
but television. Today, they have be- 
gun spreading into other media, and 
it is significant that they have not 
overlooked network radio. Beginning 
this summer, they will be on CBS Ra- 
dio nearly an hour every week. 



RADIO 

A 



Thomas F. O'iVeil, president, MBS: 
The coming season will find radio en- 
tering a new phase of selling and pro- 
graming. The trend — and it is quite 
obvious — is toward multiple broad- 
casts and shorter time period pur- 
chases. Actually the most popular cate- 
gories, according to a recent survey 
of advertisers include the 15-minute 
broadcast, accounting for 52% of all 
segments sold; the five-minute broad- 
cast, accounting for 21% of all seg- 
ments sold, and the five-minute par- 
ticipations, a newcomer to network 
{Please turn to page 300) 




NORMAN BOGGS 

V.P. in charge of sales 
Don Lee Broadcasting System 



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296 



SPONSOR 



It could happen to you ...or the 
strange, strange story of 






week contracts 




M, 






strange, strange story of two 52 week contracts 

by Norm Glenn 

To begin with, this is a true story. And this is exactly how it 
happened— so help me. 

I was sitting in a stuffy hotel room in the French Lick Hotel, 
French Lick, Indiana, listening to Todd Storz, Bob Enoch, Chuck 
Balthorpe and other members of the AIMS group of independent 
stations exchange chatter, ideas, and jokes. Came a lull in the conver- 
sation and Larry Reilly, WTXL, Springfield, said : "I guess I shouldn't 
lay myself open like this, but I sure want to thank Norm Glenn for a 
fat 52-week contract from Household Finance." 

Suddenly I was all ears. "Who, me?" I asked. 
"Well, SPONSOR anyway," said Larry. "My last ad was clipped 
from the magazine by the client and he showed it to me when he came 
to Springfield. The contract he gave me totaled $2600." 

"I'll double that," said Sherm Marshall, WOLF, Syracuse. "The 
same guy clipped my page from SPONSOR and signed up for 52 
weeks. Only my contract came to $5200." 
"Honest, fellers?" I asked. 
"Honest," said Larry and Sherm. 
"Nobody will believe this gold-dust-twin story," said I. 
"Do you want my affidavit?" said Sherm. 
"No," I said, "a letter will do." 



Trade paper advertising is often regarded as an "intangible" 
purchase. But, WTXL, WOLF, KBTV, KPQ, WPAL and many other 
tv and radio stations will argue the point — at least with re- 
spect to SPONSOR, The magazine radio and tv advertisers use. 



I' 490 ■ ks 












'/IB, 









Pt , **/>o, 







£ 4e 



«4^* • 







•*iO 



"5£ **«?•' 






RADIO AND TV ADVERTISERS USE 



gets "tangible" evidence from everywhere 



730 






from Pat O'Hallorav 

in Wenatchee, Washington 

T 



,. ...— r 



ri ..i *"• •- ^ ,.t.r.* 1^. » •jTJri* i*" v> ** 



■Ol# 






■ 



""/< „ 



>> 




""" '. 19J5 






.14 r~ « '~' " 




"•w Ed 1 

£2, if^r low , 



" u> ** •« ... . 






<"»»c 










"«■'/ 



Mw Lonny Moore 
Charleston. South Carolina 

L 



Sll *«f»4> 



/row /oe Herold 
in Denver 



Rockford, III. 

second largest 

machine tool center 

in the nation 



10th annual 
Consumer Anaylsis } 
Survey 



DISTRIBUTION OF 
LISTENERS 



Results: 

WROS< 25.6% 

Station B ]3 50/ 

WROK 

has twice as many listeners 
as Rockford's #2 station 

"Illinois Research & Surrey in co- 
'rdlnation with nii„ ois DaiIv K 

»■'"•'<- Markets and Winnebago News- 

Dapers, Inc. 



M.- 




ABC 



AFFILIATE 



Full Time for 
more than 30 years 



John J. Dixon 

Gen. Mgr. 



N-R 

Natl. Rep*. 



selling which accounts for 12%. 

A few months ago we made a six- 
figure investment with the J. A. Ward 
research organization in one of the 
most amhitious research projects ever 
undertaken by a single network. Its 
basic theme was to study people and 
their listening habits. We sought the 
answer to "How Typical Americans 
Spend Their Day." We wanted to 
know how many people listened to ra- 
dio each day, how long they listened, 
and where? Also how much of this 
listening was in the car, how much in 
the kitchen, the living room and when 
were the best times to reach them in 
each of these locations. 

The findings proved astounding. We 
discovered that in a typical day 77,- 
568.000 different people listen to their 
radios. And their listening habits have 
taken on new significance. 

Radio today is a concurrent activity, 
done while the listener is driving — 

• ••*•••• 

"The war between copy and research, 
which goes back to the 1930's, has cost 
advertisers millions and millions of dol- 
lars and has kept the advertising pro- 
fession from reaching its proper level 
of performance. Peace and a new kind 
of cooperation are being achieved and 
should be speeded up for the good of 
all. Three things are behind this: 1) 
motivational research instead of "opin- 
ion" research; 2) a new kind of com- 
munications research and 3) the activa- 
tion of research and copy planning 
committees inside the agencv." 

ALFRED j. SEAMAN 

Executive V.P. & Creative Director 

Compton Advertising 

ISetc York 

*••••••• 

cooking — making up the beds — or, 
tven making up the marketing list. 
Actually, more listening is done in the 
morning in the kitchen than in any 
other place. And this new style of 
listening is no longer done all at once 
— in the same half hour. You can no 
longer reach as many people through 
radio at a specific hour as was possi- 
ble in pre-television times — but within 
the average day you can reach more 
than 50% of all Americans. 

And that is the prime reason for the 
growth and success of scatter programs 
in radio today. We, at Mutual, have 
found the answer to cope with this 
phenomenon. Flexibility of time buys 
is the keyword at Mutual. We can 
help an advertiser reach the class of 
people he wants to reach — and at the 
proper hour, too. We look forward to 
prosperous years by meeting each new 
problem each new day in a new and 
challenging way. * * * 




II o \\ 




MAXIMUM 
POWER 



IOO.OOO 







SPONSOR 







KROD-TV 

CHANNEL 4 

EL PASO 



CBS 



TEXAS 

DUMONT - ABC 



AFFILIATED with KROD-600 kc (5000* 
Owned Operated by El Paso Times, Inc 



Rep. Nationally by the BRANHAM COMPANY 



When you buy 

KLX 

you buy the entire 
$3 BILLION 

San Francisco bay 
area market! 



IN THE EAST: 

Grant Webb & Co. 

New York, 270 Park Ave. 

Murray Hill 8-4254 

Chicago. 69 W. Washington 

State 2-3155 

Detroit, 600 Woodward Ave 

Woodward 1-8290 



IN THE WEST: 

Tracy Moore & Assoc 
Los Angeles, 
6381 Hollywood Blvd 
Hollywood 2-2351 
San Francisco, 
607 Market St. 
Garfield 1-0426 




OR CONTACT KLX OFFICES: 



Tribune Tower 

Oakland 

GLencourt 1-0660 



Monadnock Bldg. 
San Francisco 
EXbrook 2-5790 




Bud Foster, General Manager 



BRIEFLY 

Tin- size .mil wealth of Texas sre 
wide!) discussed but Infrequently doc- 
umented. \\ I \ \. Dallas, has s 90- 
page brochure designed to l'<;ir <>ut 
Nmtli [exas* contentions of wealth and 
prestige w i 1 1 1 pictures of Dallas and 

some til its newest buildings. 

• • • 

\ new group has been formed in the 
i\ industr) devoted to producing l>ft- 
iii shows through more thorough 
knowledge of the lighting problems 
that are presenl in the trade The So- 
• ici\ of Tele\ i-ion l.i^hiiiiL' Directors, 
with headquarters in New York, has 
a membership of over ''!'• network 
Lighting directors from tin- three ma- 
jor networks. The Societ) will set 
Standards, disCUSS new equipment. e\- 

change views on various problems in 
their realm, publish pamphlets. 

• • • 

The latest promotion on its \\a\ to 
admen b) KNX, Los Angeles, is also 
designed to he their hottest. A ther- 
mometer, with the temperature scale 
drawing attention to 84 degrees, points 
lip the station's claim that 84 fc of the 
radio families in the Metropolitan 
Los Angeles area listen to KIS'X in the 
course of a week. A series of illus- 
trations on the thermometer card also 
draw- attention to other high spots of 

KNX's coverage. 

» » » 

Radio strength and coverage figures 

have heen expressed in nearly every 
pofsihle dimension, but Nashville's 
\\ SM has come up with a new- 
measurement. WSM covers 250,000 
gourds, according to Farm Director 
John McDonald. 

When McDonald found that the fa- 
miliar gourds that once were common 
in almost every home were now some- 
thing of a rarity, he got a supply of 
the seeds together and then offered 
them to his listener- Accordingly, 
listeners to McDonald's Noontime 
Veighbors sent in for the seeds which 
the station reports will result in the 

harvest of 250,000 gourds this \ear. 
» » * 

\\ hen San Antonio golfer Joe Con- 
rad won the British Amateur Coif 
Championship, KITE New- Director 
Coit Butler had a phone interview with 
Conrad on the air in less than an hour. 
KITE's -peed in reaching Conrad was 
understandable since it was the first 
time that a Texan had ever won the 
Championship, though it had been won 
h\ Americans nine times previously. 



"«• *^.w 



i 1 HAVfln 

LOOKED UP/ 



SPECIALIZED NEGRO 
PROGRAMMING 

With 100% Negro progromming pt<- 
icnnel, KPRS it effectively directing 
the buying Kabitt of ilt vott, faithful 
oudience. Your tolet mrttoge voitii 
neither lime nor money in nothing 
th» heart of itt "preferred" market. 
Buying time on KPRS it libo buying the 
the only radio ttotion in a community 
«F 118.000 active protpectt. 

1,000 W. 1590 KC. 

KPRS 

KANSAS CITY. MISSOURI 
for avaiiabiJiriei call Humboldt 3100 

Repreiented Netienilly ky- 

Jeirph Htrtkey McCilUre. Inc. 




there's an 
AIMS station 
in the market- 

it's the BEST 
INDEPENDENT! 



Boston 

Clevelond 

Dallas 

Denver 

Des Moines 

Evanston, III. 

Evansville , Ind. 

Houston 

Indianapolis 

Jackson/ Miss. 

Konsas City 

Huntington, II. 

Louisville 

Milwaukee 



WCOP 

WDOK 

KUF 

KMYR 

KCBC 
WNMP 

WIKY 

KNUZ 
WXLW 

WJXN 

WHB 

WGSM 

WKYW 

WMIL 



New Orleans 
New York 
Omaha 
Portland.Ore. 
San Antonio 
San Francisco 
Seattle 
Springfi-. 
Stockton ,Col. 
Syracuse 
Tulsa 

Wichita ,Kon. 
Worcester,Masv 



WTIX 

WINS 

KOWH 

KXl 

KITE 

KYA 

KOI 

WTXL 

KSTN 

WOLF 

KFMJ 

KWBB 

WNEB 



Canada 

Calgary, Alberta, Canada 
New Westminister, B.C. 




CKXL 
CKNW 



» Membershi p 

by invitation 

only 



RADIO GROUP 



11 JULY 1955 



301 




KTVH IS THE "BIG ONE" 

IN THE WICHITA AREA 

Strong CBS shows, plus high-interest local 
programming (day and night), put KTVH first 
in Wichita, Hutchinson, and the entire Central 
Kansas area. Pulse (March 1955) and ARB 
show KTVH first, by far! WINDY says, "To be 
a big ONE, join a big ONE." 



KTVH 

HUTCHINSON 



ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



I 



VHF 

240,000 
WATTS 



CBS BASIC— DUMONT 



^CHANNEL 

12 



RoprtienKd Nolionolly by H-R R«preienlolivei, Inc. 

KTVH, pioneer station in rich Central 
Kansas, serves more than 14 important 
communities besides Wichita. Main 
office and studios in Hutchinson; office 
and studio in Wichita (Hotel Lassen). 
Howard O. Peterson, General Manager. 



FIRST 

PUEBLO 

COLORADO 

KKIV 

CHANNEL 11 

FIRST IN 
COLORADO 
SPRINGS, TOO 

Covering Colorado Springs and Pueblo 
for CBS, ABC, and DuMonl 

television networks 
NATIONAL SALES OFFICE 
KKTV, PUEBLO, COLORADO 



Repreiented by CEO. P. HOUINGBERY 



A.BC Film _ 

AIMS 

Air Trails 

ASCAP 
Assoc. Press 

BBDO _ 

BMI _ 



Brinkerhoff. & Williams 
CBS Radio Net 

CBS TV Net 

Sam Evans Prod _ 

Free & Peters 

Georgia Trio 



142-143 
301 

liarklic.ll.-, 160-161 

279 

7 

179 

no 



2(12-203 

_ 8-9 

_ _ 294 

38-39 

_ _ 181 

Guild Films 1«-149 



KX.ii; TV. Valley City, X. Dak. 
KX.ll: TV Valley City, X. l»ak. 
K'Xi.A, Pasadena 
KYTV, Springfield, Mo. 

WABT, Birmingham 
WAFB TV, Baton Rouge .. 
WAGA, At lama 
WAVE TV, Louisville . 
WliA M. Montgomery 



Harrington, 
H-U Heps 
Keystone 

Kudner 

Don Lee _. 
MCA TV _ 



Righter & Parsons. 



MeCann-Erickson 

McClatchy 

Meredith 
Mid-Continent .... 

NBC TV Net 

NWTV __ 

Pearson 

Petry 

Precision Film _ 
Pulse 



62 
67 

197 

13 

157 
.136-137 
-14-15 

193 

2 4.". 

22 

ss-S't 

293 

182 

FC 



.-.. _ 147 

_ 101 



Raeburn 296 

Ray & Berger _ _.. 78 

RCA Equip 141 

Screen Gems 132 

Song Ads _ . in 

Stars 178 

Steinman 3 

Storer 224-225 

Studio Films 34-35 

TPA _ __ .80, 84, 97, 103 

Westinghouse 212-213 

Young & Rubicam 17 



CKLW, Detroit 
CKWX, Vancouver . 

KBET TV, Sacramento _ 

KB1G, Hollywood 

KlilS, Bakersfield 

KCBS, San Francisco _ 

i\> .uC TV, Texarkana 

KCOR, San Antonio 

KDUB TV, Lubbock 

KEDD TV, Wichita, Kans. 

KELQ TV, Sioux Falls 

KFAB, Omaha 

KFAL, Fulton, Mo. 

KFMB TV, San Diego 

KFRC, San Francisco 

KGA, Spokane 

KGNC, Amarillo 

KGUL TV, Galveston 

KGVO TV, Missoula 

KHJ, Los Angeles 

Kilol, TV, Kearney, Xebr. .. 

KIEM, Eureka, Calif 

KIXG TV, Seattle 

KKTV, Colorado Springs 

KLX, Oakland 

KMA, Shenandoa, Iowa 

KM1*.<\ Kansas City, Mo 

KMTV, Omaha, Nebr. 

KNUZ, Houston 

KOA, Denver 

KOAT TV, Albuquerque 

KOIL, Omaha 

KPHO, Phoenix 

KPQ, Wenatchee _ 

KI'US, Kansas City, Mo _ 

Kl'TV, Portland, Ore. 

KRIZ, Phoenix ...175, 

KENT TV Des Moines 

KROD TV, El Paso 

KRON TV, San Francisco 

KSAX, San Francisco 

KSl'.W TV. Salinas 

KSD-TV, St. Louis _ - — - 

KSIK). San Diego — — - 

KSL, Salt Lake City — . 

KSL TV, Salt Lake City 

KSLA TV, Shreveport 

KSTN, Stockton, Calif. — 

KSTP TV. St. Paul — - 

KSTT. Davenport, Iowa _ 

KTBC TV, Austin 

KTI'.S TV. Shreveport 

KTHS. Little Rock __ 

TV, Tacoma 

TV, Houston 
San Antonio 



KTXT 
K t i ; K 
KTSA, 
KTVH. 
KTVW 
Is T X 1 . 



Hutchinson. Kans 

Tacoma. Wash. 

TV, San Angelo, Tex. 



K\'< iD TV, Denver 



WBAY, Green Bay, Wis. 

WBEN TV, Buffalo 

WBNS, Columbus, O. 
wi'.'iw. Terre Haute 
WBZ (Westinghouse), Boston 

WCAO, Baltimore 

WCHS TV. Charleston, S. C. _ 

WCSH TV, Portland, Me 

WCUE, Akron . 

WDBJ, Roanoke 

WDEF, Chattanooga . 
WHIA, Memphis 



WEI-IT TV, Henderson 

WFAA, Dallas _ 

WFAA TV. Dallas 

WFBL, Syracuse 

WPBM TV, Indianapolis 

wfmy TV, Greensboro 

WGN TV, Chicago 

WGR, Buffalo 

WHAM, Rochester 

WHBF, Rock Island 

WHIO TV. Dayton . 

WHO, Des Moines 

WHTN TV, Huntington, W. Va. .. 70 

WIBW, Topeka, Kans. 178 

WIBW TV, Topeka _ 259 

WICS TV, Springfield, 111 81 

WICU, Erie . 121 

WILK TV. Wilkes-Barre 93 

W1X-T, Fort Wayne 108 

WliUi TV, Miami _ 164 



241 
169 

123 

6 
294 
29 
41 
289 
292 
110 
111 
19 
293 
125 
157 
293 
273 
42 
295 
157 
1H4 
303 
40 
302 
301 
ITT. 
BC 
. 106 
. 174 
. 199 
235 
1ST 
177 
. 176 
. 301 
. 227 
17'.' 
29 
301 
77 
168 
30 
117 
16 
173 
72 
74 
292 
14.-. 
164 
l.-.l 
253 

107 
98 

23 7 
3H2 



82 
112 



100 

89 

294 
300 

102 
IS 

231 

277 

i7<; 

281 

...... 83 

162 

303 

158-0.-59 
10 

255 

68 

169 

172 

172 

257 

295 

189 

71 

163 

243 

267 

109 

167 

263 

177 

249 

25 



WH'K, Tampa 
WIP, Philadelphia . 

WISH TV, Indianapolis 

WITH, Baltimore 

WJAC TV, Johnstown 

WJBK, Detroit ..... 

WJBK TV, Detroit 

WJR, Detroit 

WKBT, La Crosse 

WKBX, Youngstown ... 

WKMI, Kalamazoo 

VVKOW, Madison, Wis. 

WKY TV. Oklahoma City 

WKZO, Kalamazoo ... 

WLAC, Nashville 

WLAC TV, Nashville 

WLBC TV. Muncie 

WLS, Chicago 



219 
239 
251 
33 
102 
233 
229 
215 
108 
174 
261 
168 
129 
269 
152 
139 
108 



293 
WMAi; TV. Baltimore .. ... 32 

WMBG, Richmond IFC 

WMBV TV. Marinette, Wis. 85 

WMCT, Memphis 223 

WMGY, Montgomery ......... 180 



WMT, Cedar Rapids _ 
W.sAX. Yankton, S. Dak. . 

WNBQ, Chicago 

WNDU TV, South Bend 

WNHC TV, Xew Haven 

WOI TV, Ames, Iowa 

WOKY, Milwaukee 
WOLF, Syracuse 



11 
165 

na 
37 
247 
271 
166 
207 
217 
208 
105 



WOOD TV, Grand Rapids 

WOW, Omaha 

WOW TV, (imaha 

WPEN, Philadelphia _ 

WPRO, Providence 27:. 

WRC, Washington, D. C. 191 

WRCA, New York 287 

WREN, Topeka 166 

WREX TV, Rockford 283 

WRGB. Schenectady _ .. 79 

WROK, Pock Island 300 

WSA1 TV Wausau, Wis ..... 296 

WSB TV, Atlanta 285 

WSBT TV, South Bend ... 



YYSFA TV, Montgomery 
WSJS TV, Winston-Salem 

ws.M TV, Nashville 

WSoK. Nashville 
WSPD, Toledo 



WTIC, Hartford — 

WTOP Washington, 1' C. 

WTRF TV, Wheeling. W. Va. 

WTTV, Bloomington _ 
WTYW. Milwaukee 



WTXI.. Springfield. Mass. 
WVEC TV, Hamilton. Va. 
WWDC, Washington, D. C. - 
ww.i Detroil 
WXIX. Milwaukee 



... 20-21 

... 76 

31 

..... 219 

221 

195 

2S 

127 

73 

...... 69 

201 

81, B5 

..... 1BC 

.... 265 

. ...26-27 






302 



SPONSOR 



40 EAST 49TH ST. 
I Continued from poge 1- i 

SEPARATE CONVENTIONS? 

II. ,u man] stations Feel that thia 
year's \ \li 1 1'- joint i onvention «>l ra- 
dio , m ,| i,-|,.\ ision oughl to be the last 
one and thai henceforth, our es- 
teemed trad.' aaaociation should oper- 
ate H\<> separate conventions one re- 
stricted to radio only, the other to 

(elev i — i * > n ? 

The split of competition is now ob- 
\ ions. The good <>l such conventions 
is now divided, and with the increas- 
ing emphasis being placed <>n t\. it is 
high time the radio only interests bad 
a meeting to themselves. . . . 

Personally, we Bee no more reason 
to attend an) future convention where 
t\ dominates than to go into a motion 
picture or newspaper publisher con- 
vention. \\ '• have elected to follow the 
radio onK course and know there are 
mam others who would welcome a 
fast-moving meeting of sales and pro- 
gram and promotion ideas applicable 
to radio. 

Such a change is inevitable. The 
question is, will the NARTB manage- 



ment recognize it. before radio I - 

the action? 

\ 1 1 < I uh\ don't j on trade press peo- 
ple gel behind a displa) of outstandin 
radio station promotion ads, booklets, 
etc., from evei j state. Perhaps a few 
awards or recognition might stimulate 
wider participation. 

Stevi i ISLEH 
President 

k I //«'. San I ram ist <> 



The CALir.-ORE. 
TV TWINS 

I/TFM CHANNEL 3 
IML1T1 Eureka, Calif. 

1/prC CHANNEL 5 
A Dill) Med ford, Ore. 

two markets 
one billing 

MARKET FACTS 

POPULATION 291,906 

FAMILIES 91,220 

RETAIL SALES $378,018,000 

CONSUMER SPEND- 
ABLE INCOME .. $426,188,000 
"The Calif.-Ore. TV TWINS bridge 
the gap between San Francisco & 
Portland with EXCLUSIVE VHF Cov- 
erage on Channels 3 & 5." 

for CALIF.-ORE. TV TWINS 
call Don Telford, Gen. Mgr. 

ask EfcSyfejSa nati0 " al 
^r^^^ representatives 



COLOR PROGRESS 

Sincere congratulations to the fier- 
iii-\ Co. and WCHS-TN Fortheii vision 
and courage in joining the ranks ol 
tin- pioneer- of color t\. \\ lien \\ S \/- 
T\ inaugurated color network servi e 
in March, L954, there was a general 
apathj «in the part of the public foi 

this miraculous new development. We 

have seen a heartening increase in in- 
terest and response both within and 
outside the industry since the o\ i- 
whelming success of our Peter Pan 
presentation both in monochrome and 
color. When W SAZ-TV began local 
color program originations in March 
of this year it was with the hope that 
this new service could be rapirilv made 
available to the public in significant 
numbers. Now with both stations 
serving substantial half-a-million t\ 
homes with network and local film 
color programs, the public will be the 
greatest beneficiary. 

We confidently expect the advent of 
the new simplified circuit. 21-inch tube 
color sets to achieve widespread public 
acceptance by fall of this year. We 
are confident that color tv will be in 
general home use in 1956, with a sub- 
sequent impact on the social and eco- 
nomic structure of the nation that will 
be phenomenal. Now that both major 
tv outlets in this area have completed 
the giant investments and complex 
technical improvements necessarv to 
originate color pictures, the public ma\ 
well be proud of this comprehensive 
service. Between WCHS-T\ and 
W S \Z-T\. it is likelv that there will 
be available in the area 12 to 20 hours 
of regularlv scheduled color program- 
ing weeklv. before fall. 

L. H. Rogers 

/ ./'. & Gen Mgr. 
\\ S f/.-TI 
Huntington, 11 . la. 



\\ |i< )\\ 

WBOW 

WBOW 

I93S 

WBOW 

1940 

WBOW 

1945 

WBOW 

1950 



WBOW 

1955 

For 28 years your Growing Sales- 
man in the Greater Wabash Valley 

WBOW 



1230 kc 



NBC 



250 w 



TERRE HAUTE, IXD. 

Always Pleasing 

Always Serving 

Always Selling 

Ask 

WEED & CO. 

Thev Know the Story 



11 JULY 1955 



303 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS_ 



Fall Facts Basics No. 9 

When sponsor published Fall Facts 
No. 1 back in 1947, it contained 68 
pages and under 25,000 words. With 
this ninth Fall Facts issue, sponsor 
reaches a new record size of 304 pages 
containing over 100,000 words. 

This growth is a reflection of the 
dynamic rise in importance of the air 
media themselves over the past eight 
years. Where radio in 1947 billed a 
total of $506,400,000, radio and tv 
together in 1954 billed $1,417,200,000 
(by McCann-Erickson estimates). At 
the same time the percent of total ad- 
vertising dollars going to the air media 
has risen almost 50'A between 1947 
and 1954. 

Fall Facts was designed to provide 
advertisers and agencies with the over- 
all briefing they need to make wise 
fall buying decisions — and to serve 
the year-'round as a desk-top manual 
of the air media. The fact that it takes 
four times as many pages to do the 
job today is an index of the increasing 
complexity as well as growth of the 
air media. 

It was out of a desire to cut through 
the complexity that sponsor has 
always taken a simple, down-to-earth 
approach in Fall Facts. The question- 
and-answer style was introduced in 
1950 in order to pinpoint each topic 
for readers. Radio Basics was intro- 
duced in 1951 to give readers the 
fundamental facts about radio, charted 
and sorted for easiest understanding. 
Television Basics followed in 1952 and 
Film Basics in L954. With this issue 
SPONSOR presents the completely new 
Timebuying Basics, a 40,000-word 
! k-within-a-book on timebuying. 

The word basics so well expresses 
the editorial objective of Fall Facts 



that this year we decided the issue 
should henceforth be called Fall Facts 
Basics. 

What's in Fall Facts Basics that you 
must read now for immediate guid- 
ance? We've asked sponsor's 10-man 
staff, who've been hard at work pre- 
paring Fall Facts Basics over the past 
two months, to answer that question. 
Each staff member who headed up re- 
search and writing on individual rail 
Facts Basics sections was assigned this 
job: "Tell the readers — briefly — what's 
in your section for them." In their 
own words, this is the staff's report: 

TELEVISION: "In researching tele- 
vision, we had assumed that this year 
would find spot buyers anticipating 
an easier job clearing nighttime avail- 
abilities. But it's apparent advertisers 
who have had any such notion will be 
in for a surprise. In fact, as our cover- 
age of spot tv availabilities indicates 
(page 641. advertisers will do well 
to start buying earlier this year. 

"Several reps point out that even 
where plans for a campaign are not 
quite set advertisers would be smart 
to suggest that timebuyers notify reps 
about the account's needs long in 
advance. 

"One conclusion we've reached, and 
this seems quite important in planning 
for the coming year, is that a major 
national advertiser should not allow 
the tight nighttime situation to hold 
him back from planning a spot tv 
campaign. The account ^with sub- 
stantial, long-term plans will eventually 
come up with the right kind of slots 
even where the picture at night is 
bleak for the smaller account with less 
bargaining power. 

"Advertisers who have been think- 
ing about daytime, ought to be on the 
alert to move fairly soon. There's 
more interest in daytime spot. 

"On the network front it seems 
apparent to us that clients who have 
network programs in prime time will 
experience more impact this fall than 
ever. Even more than in the early days 
when people used to crowd around 
sets, a dozen to a living room, and eat 
you out of house and popcorn. Tell 
your dealers to stock up. And tell 
'em like you mean it if you have a 
piece of the audience network tele- 
\ ision will deliver this fall. 

"We might point up for the readers 
the fact that we have a complete chart 
of the nighttime and daytime tele- 
vision lineup for next fall (as far as it's 



yet set I on pages 90-95. Useful for 
both spot and network considerations." 

RADIO: "A lot that's going to happen 
this fall in spot radio is a culmination 
of the things we've been reporting on 
in sponsor over the past few years. 
Our research in the past has shown 
strong reasons for radio effectiveness. 
Now many of the points we've been 
making seem to be increasingly ac- 
cepted and reflected in buying plans. 

"Our conclusion is this: Admen will 
do well to think about buying spot 
radio a good deal earlier than last 
year because more accounts are active 
and availabilities are tighter. And 
that's true of nighttime as well. There's 
something of a nighttime rediscovery 
trend running in fact. 

"Network radio merits really close 
study on the part of the advertiser 
who has been putting his money into 
other forms of air media over recent 
years. This is a new medium. The 
conventional pattern of half-hour show 
sponsorship is almost non-existent. 
Net radio today is a multi-unit and 
smaller-unit buy. Maybe our enthu- 
siasm is showing but we can't help but 
think a lot of print budgets will get 
a very careful screening alongside the 
advantages this new network radio has 
to show." 

BASICS: "Television, Film and Radio 
Basics have so much meat, all we can 
say is: read 'em, file 'em, stuff 'em 
under your desk blotter. When you 
need the fundamental facts, they'll be 
there. But the big new service in this 
issue is Timebuving Basics. 

"We took the perhaps 100,000 
words that were spoken at the RTES 
Timebuving and Selling seminars at 
Toots Shor's in New York and boiled 
them down to a 40,000-word book. 
It covers every aspect of timebuying — 
and that doesn't mean merely the 
aspects of concern to buyers alone. 
This is for everybody in the business. 
There are talks which make the tech- 
nical side of radio and television clear. 
Talks on agency-seller relations. And 
in the give and take of post-session 
question and answers, which we've 
retained as caught by a stenotypist, 
\ ou get the real flavor of the business. 
What else can we say? Tell 'em to 

read it." 

* * * 

After two months of digging, edit- 
ing, digesting. SPONSOR'S staff isn't in 
the mood for inhibitions. Neither are 
we. So we'll tell vou: Read it. 



304 



SPONSOR 



WWDC 




in Washington, D.C 



WWDC has the second biggest audience in 
Washington — 12 hours a day. 7 days a week] 
At \\ \\ I)(]*s low rates, it's really first — on a 
results-producing ha>i>. Gel the whole stor) 
from your John Blair & Co. man. 







•Complete Pulse: In-home Jan. -Feb. 1955, Out-of-home Jan. 1955 - 6:00 AM to 6:00 PM 



«-> ^ 



A 



e 



1$ &ABC and 

KMBC-TV 

Kansas City's Most Powerful TV Station 




KMBC-TV is proud to announce its 
new television affiliation (effective , 
September 28) with America's. ~n)ost 
dynamic and fastest-growing, television 
network, the American Broadcasting 
Company. With this fcwing, KMBC-TV 
makes a significant, forward-looking 
change. Television is the medium of to- 
day and the future, and we are planning; 
building and doing things for the future 
— along with ABC-TV. 

Maybe Davy Crockett did it, single- 
handed. When there is a nationwide Davy 
Crockett craze — stemming from one won- 
derful program on one network, it's reason 
to stop and think about that network. 

Walt Disney and his fabulous Disneyland 
show have meant a great deal to ABC-TV, 
and to television generally. With the up- 
coming Walt Disney Mickey Mouse Club, 
a full-hour of excitement every weekday, we 
can all look forward to more TV miracles. 
Surprised? We're not, for Walt Disney is a 
product of Kansas City and its schools. 
Naturally we're proud of Mr. Disney — 
and loyal, too! 

And we Kansas Citians like fights. As you 
know, the famous Wednesday Night Fights 
are now on ABC-TV. 

We are also men of peace and contemplation 
... so we are justly pleased that Bishop Sheen 
will be on ABC-TV and KMBC-TV this fall. 

There is more, much more: Wyatt Earp, the first 
adult western on television. Warner Brothers 
Presents, a full-hour each week of new Warner- 
produced television, each program built around 
their highly successful motion picture properties, 
such as "Casablanca," "Cheyenne" and "King's Row." 

With our 1079-foot KMBC-TV tower (tallest in 
this area) and 316,000 watts of power on Channel 
9, we know that families on the perimeter of the 
Kansas City market (as well as our closer neigh- 
bors) will be seeing the fine new programs, and 
many of their old favorites, on ABC-TV. Network 
programming available on a dependable service basis 
only from the KMBC-TV tall-tower transmitter. 

Then, there's the matter of time for more local pro- 
gramming. KMBC-TV leads in every local category: 
highest-rated locally produced women's show... 
highest-rated locally produced weekday kid shows . . . 
highest-rated locally produced news-weather-sports 
shows . . . highest-rated late movie. To these we want to 
add other fine local features for which plans have 
long been in the making. 

So it's off with the old and on with the new, at 
KMBC-TV— as The Swing to ABC continues and our 
station identification in late September will proudly 
announce to viewers: "This is Channel 9, Kansas City, 
affiliated with the American Broadcasting Company." 



KMBC-TV 



Kansas City's Most Powerful TV Station 



_ 




*y 



DON DAVIS. / lent 

JOHN KHJUINI nt ami C.cn 

CtORCt HICCIN nt ami Satr 

MORICREINIi iaion 

And in Radio, it's the KMBC-KFRM 



in the Heart of America 
KMBC a/ Kansas City 
KFRM ^<W the State of 




magazine radio ai 



advertisers use 



50< per copy« $ 8 per year 




II 



in the Land tL/Mk andflmif 

1 The Test Market Station recently studied by the University of Wisconsin. 

2 The current Test Market Station for B&M Beans and Brown Bread. 

3 The future Test Station for a big Farm Study. 



Yep! Biggetn Baltimote! 



I 




'BAY 



.AVON R EVANS. Gen Mgr - 
Pep AEtO TELEVISION 




" 



LET'S REVE 
SPOT SPENDING 

page 25 





Can commercials 
ntertain and sell r 

page 30 



Near end of 6-month 
B&M tv market test: 
sales 93 above 1954 

page 32 



Why Nash does 60 
better in bV 



i 



ge 34 




U.S. timehuy 

New York Coast 

and ' oart 

page 35 



WAS "LUCY" A 
SALES FLOP? 



page 



28 





Has radio done all 
that's needed to 
revamp programs, sales' 

page 64 



WITH reaches 




of all Baltimore homes every week! 

That's penetration for you! As the Cumulative Pulse 
Audience Survey shows, just about three-quarters of all 
the homes in Baltimore are reached weekly by W-I-T-H. 

At W-I-T-H's low, low rates, W-I-T-H delivers listen- 
ers at the lowest cost-per-thousand of any advertising 
medium in Baltimore. Just get your Forjoe man to tell 
you the whole W-I-T-H story! 

IN BALTIMORE THE BIG BUY IS 




Tom Tinsley, President 



R. C. Embry, Vice-President 



Represented by Forjoe & Co. 







More "Monitor" 
may be offered 



CT's deal is 
film bombshell 



SAC wants 100% 
show reuse pay 



'Disneyland" 
rides again 



Polls show anti- 
fee tv trend 



Despite talk of weekday daytime "Monitor" on NBC Radio, likelihood I 
that more hours during weeken d will be offered to national clie:* - 
first. Web will probbaly add 11 hours for network sale to current 14 
hours in network option time now being sold. New periods would be 
11:00 p.m. Saturday to 8:00 a.m. Sunday; 10:00 p.m. to Midnight Sun- 
day. Additional time for national sponsors is being planned because 
of sales success of "Monitor," with 72' of time sold on average (na- 
tional sales went as high as 97% on 4 July weekend). If okayed, week- 
day "Monitor" would probably be 2-hour strip. 

-SR- 

Effect of General Tire's purchase of RKO Radio Pictures Corp. on 
Hollywood has been king-sized jolt. Overnight, GT's subsidiary Gen- 
eral Teleradio has landed control in $25 million deal of huge (over 
400 films) RKO backlog of features ranging from "The Informer" to 
"Notorious," making it kingpin of tv feature film rental bu s iness and 
giving it potential of a "film network." Outsiders now predict that 
a few of choicest items may wind up as 90-minute network "spectacu- 
lars," others will be formed into new packages of a la "Million 
Dollar Movie" with top rental prices. RKO will continue to distribute 
theatrical films. 

-SR- 

Cost of program film reruns may skyrocket in fall if SAG gets its way. 
Union demands 100% of minimum scale payments to actors for second and 
third film runs in negotiations with Alliance of TV Film Producers. 
Contract expired 20 July. At SPONSOR'S presstime request for federal 
mediation was in offing. 

-SR- 

Fact 90-minute preview of Disneyland Park on ABC TV 17 July ran rough- 
shod over opposition bodes well for web's "Mickey Mouse Club," to 
debut in fall. Trendex rating for 15 cities gave "Disn eyl and" prev iew 
19.5 rating , with 58.4% share of audience during hour and a half. 
CBS ran poor second with 9.1 rating, 27.3% share, while NBC got only 
1.2 rating with 3.6^ share (NBC shows were "Do it Yourself," and 
special hour program on Geneva Big Four summit meeting). ABC is now 
pitching to sponsors argument that appeal of Disney characters to 
children will attract adults to tv screen during 5:00-6:00 p.m. period 
of "Mickey Mouse Club." 

-SR- 

Continuing agitation on fee tv front reflected by recent newspaper 
polls, both of which showed strong opposition to coin-box video. 
Statewide survey by Minneapolis Star & Tribune showed 72°S of all adult 
tv householders against fee tv with 22% in favor. Poll by El Paso 
Herald Post came up with thumping 15-to-l vote against subscription 
tv. Meanwhile, date for public hearings on fee tv question draws 
near with deadline for rebuttal comments to FCC set at 11 September. 



SPONSOR. Volume t N- IS -'• lab bhratkly b> SFONSOB Publications. Inc. Fi.>culire. UttorJ . natation Offices. 4^ E Mfe St. Xe<r 

York 17. Printed tt SUO Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md $S i ye»r | n US »9 elsewhere. Entered is second eU»s milter 29 Jin. 1919 it Biltlmort postooVe. under Art of I Mir. 187t 



-. 



Ki:i»OltT TO SPONSORS for 25 Jiilv 1955 



TvB promotion 
spending up 



Local am show 
audience cume 



Spot dollar 
figures sought 



Promotion activities by TvB in its first year are running at high 
gear, as members keep coming in. TvB is now spending at rate well 
over $400,000 annual budget set when group got underway 1 January. 
New members announced last week included 5 stations, one rep. Total 
membership is now 140 stations, 8 reps, one network (CBS). New sta- 
tion members are KTRK-TV, Houston; WCP0-TV, Cincinnati; WEWS, Cleve- 
land; WMAL-TV, Washington, D.C.; WUSN-TV, Charleston, S.C. New rep 
member is Branham Co. Reps already members are Blair-TV ; Free & 
Peters; Harrington, Righter & Parsons; Hoag-Blair ; Katz Agency; 
Meeker-TV; Edward Petry. 

-SR- 
Degree to which single radio show can accumulate audience is shown by 
Nielsen Station Index for New York City. April report showed one 
m orning music s t rip reached 1 70,0 homes per broadcast , 902,000 
different homes in 4 weeks. Figuring average of 1.5 listeners per 
home, 4-week total comes to 1,353,000 persons catching one show on 
one station. 

~ c :r- 

Renewed efforts to gather detailed data on spot radio expenditures 
will be made in fall. RAB will quer y cross-section of stations to get 
doll ar figure s by brands. These would be released quarterly. James 
M. Boerst, publisher of "Spot Radio Report," will make intensive 
canvass of ad agencies for spot radio facts. "Spot Radio Report" now 
runs data given by agencies, but number of brands reported is small. 
Still burning question of how spot data — both radio and tv — should be 
gathered is subject of questionnaire in current issue of SPONSOR. 
Questionnaire is directed at sponsors, agencies, reps. (For details 
on questionnaire and background of 20-year-ef f ort to unearth spot air 
spending, see page 25. ) 

-SR- 
Ronson's late-summer plunge into network tv through Norman, Craig & 
Kummel (formerly Wm. Weintraub agency) is part of agency's rapid tv 
build-up. Firm's 52-week sponsorship of 2 nights of CBS TV Doug 
Edwards, starting 24 August, marks Ronson's reentry into network after 
5-year hiatus. Ronson's $ 5.5 m illion tv expenditure will bring 
agency's tv billings to $11 million, according to radio-tv v. p. Walter 
Craig, "although we started from scratch in January." 

-SR- 
Trade press reports Philip Morris dropped tv in favor of print are 
incorrect, SPONSOR learned in doing story on PM's Marlboro. Actually, 
s witch is from netw ork to spot. Though final budgets aren't set, ad 
director Roger Greene expects more than half this year's ad dollars 
will be spent in spot tv, radio. Move is spurred by feeling time for 
change of ad pace had come. Additional factor: firm believes brief, 
simple copy story does not require lengthy nrogram commercials. This 
is reason behind company's cancellation of "I Love Lucy." "Public 
Defender" not dissatisfaction with shows themselves. (See page 28.) 

-SR- 
Latest CBS Radio presentation puts new emphasis on way advertisers 
can tailor web to s pecific geogr aphic ar eas. Cited among clients 
using limited networks are Amoco, with Atlantic Coast skein; Corn 
Products, with Southern lineup; Hanam Brewing, with Midwestern web. 
Dubbed "New Patterns," CBS presentation highlights growing flexi- 
bility of net radio. 

(Sponsor Reports continues page ftl ) 
I _ ___' 



Ronson returns 
to net tv 



Why PM dropped 
"I Love Lucy" 



CBS Radio push 
on tailored webs 



SPONSOR 



it's a woman's world 




n 



i 






RADIO 
TV- FM 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

Rep: Katz Agency 
affiliated with publishers of Better Homes & Gardens and Successful Farming 



And Anne Hayes, KCMO's 
Director of Women's Activit. 
covers every bit of it admir- 
ably — from how you drape 
a picture window to when 
you use a pinch of marjoram. 
Every weekday, she's on the 
air with a fifteen-minute 
radio program and a half-hour 
television show. Keeping 
Mid-America's discriminating 
homemakers interested (which 
Anne does with ease) takes 
background and experience, 
training and talent. Of these, 
she has a sufficiency. 

Her informative and helpful 
advice to women has won her 
an impressive list of citations — 
like the Foster Parents Plan 
Award, Advisory Board 
appointment for the American 
Women Broadcasters for the 
United Nations, First Honorary 
Member of The American 
Women's Business Association 
and special recognition from 
the Women's Chamber of 
Commerce, as well as a 
Community Service Award 
from the United Funds 
Campaign Agencies. 

Covering a woman's world 
is all in the day's work for 
Anne. Hearing and seeing her 
is all in the day's schedule 
for women audiences in 
Mid-America. 



advertisers use 




25 



28 



30 



32 



ARTICLES 



Meet's bring spot spi'nding ouf in I he* open 

Everyone agrees spot dollar expenditures of companies should be reported 
just as they are for all other major media. Yet progress has been slow in 20 
years of trying to reveal spot spending. Two new attempts are due soon 



Fastest growing filter-tip 

Marlboro sales have been soaring steadily — and its commercials on "I Love 
Lucy" as well as spot tv were important in successful launching of new filter- 
tip. In new strategy, for both Philip Morris and Marlboro, spot tv will be of 
major importance despite rumored switchover to print 



Can commercials entertain — and self? 

Nashville agency, Noble-Dury, believes they can. Agency raised regional 
products to high competitive position against stiff opposition by national 
brands. Sonqs were used in animated tv commercials that actually drew fan mail 



II A M finds tv stronger sales spur thttn price cut 

Last year at this time Burnham & Morrill used a price reduction to stimulate 
sales. It worked but sales this year in the Green Bay, Wis. test market far 
outstripped last year's, with tv the spur to sales rather than price cuts 

ftnrfio helps make Boston top \ash territorg 

Though nationally Nash ranks 13th in car sales, in the Boston area it is in ninth 
place. One reason: the Leo Egan "All About Sports" show nightly on WBZ, 
sponsored by 45 of the area's Nash Dealers 



Timebugers of the U.S. 

Part two of the list of timebuyers which began in the Fall Facts Basics Issue 
(II July), includes remainder of New York as well as Chicago, East, Midwest 



COMING 



ffote do gou lick the tlaglight savings problem? 

This is what agencies and networks are doing to solve the problem created by 
daylight savinqs time. It's a headache any year but worse now that New York 
City carries daylight savings time into October O III!/ 

What K«V tl learned front its 26-week tv test 

With next article Burnham & Morrill television test results will be complete. 

This is what the company feels it has learned from test market experience 8 -'"'If 

\\ hat i/o it should know about network flexibilitg 

The continuing pattern of changes towards flexibility has created network 
radio buying plans which come as a complete surprise to some admen. 
Here's a picture of just what the buyer can do today on the radio networks S <4tf<| 

NOTE: For revisions of fall tv programing chart which last appeared in I I July 
Fall Facts Basic issue, see next issue 8 August 



34 



35 



Volume 9 Number 15 
25 July 1955 



I 



DEPARTMENTS 



TIMEBUYERS 

AGENCY AD LIBS 

40 E. 49TH 

NEW & RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR. R. Strumpen-Dorrie . 

SPONSOR BACKSTAGE 

FILM NOTES 

TV COMPARAGRAPH 

P. S. 

RADIO RESULTS 

SPONSOR ASKS _ 

AGENCY PROFILE, Norman Srrouse 

ROUND-UP 

NEW TV STATIONS 

NEWSMAKERS 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 



Editor and President: Norman R. Glenn 
Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glen' 
Vice President-Genl. Manager: Bernard P 
Vice Pres.-Advg. Director: Jacob A. & 
Editorial Director: Miles David 
Senior Editors: Charles Sinclair, Alfred J. Ja 
Associate Editor: Evelyn Konrad 
Department Editor: Li I a Lee Seaton 
Assistant Editor: Ed Feldmann 
Contributing Editors: Bob Foreman, Joe Ci 
Editorial Assistant: Florence Ettenberg 
Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Lester Cole 
Advertising Department: Edwin D. Coc 
(Western Manager), Alan H. Giellerup 
(Southwest Manager), Arnold Alpert (M 
west Manager), John A. Kovchok (Prod 
tion Manager), Charles L. Nash 
Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz ( 
scription Manager), Emily Cutillo, Morton 
Kahn, Minerva Mitchell 
Office Manager: Catherine Scott Rose 
Readers' Service: Augusta B. Shearman 
Accounting Department: Eva M. Sanford 



Published biweekly b> SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS I) 
combined with TV. Executive. Editorial. Circulation. 
Advertising Offices 40 E. 49th St. (49th * Madia 
New York 17. N. T. Telephone: MUrray Hill e-S 
Chicago Office: 161 E. Grand Ave. Phvfle: Sl> 
7-9863. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Bouler 
Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 
Ave.. Baltimore 11. Sid Subscriptions: United St 
$8 a year. Canada and foreign »9. Single copies 
Printed in U.S.A. Address all correspondence to 
E. 49th St.. New York 17. N. Y MUrray Hill »-J 
Copyright 1955. SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 




^J* •"■ 



... 60/ 




KTBIS-TV sMRevePORV 



MARKET 



RICH . . . Spendable Income- 
over 1 Billion dollars* 

READY ... TV Sets-1 00,000 plust 

RESPONSIVE ... 1954 Retail Sales 
•srds +nbc 857,709,000* 

MAXIMUM POWER 

VIDEO . . . 100,000 WATTS 

AUDIO . . . 69,800 WATTS 

TOWER ... 1151 FT. ABOVE GROUND 



Represented by PETR I 





ONE GOOD MEASURE of a medi- 
um's strength: does it really believe 
in advertising — FOR ITSELF? 

KBIC, The Catalina Station, considers 
it no incident that 1955 is its biggest 
year in billings — AND in its own ad- 
vertising. 

MEDIA galore tell Southern Califor- 
nia's ever-increasing millions of the 
romance, music and news they hear 
at 740 on their radio dial. . . . 

RADIO, OUR OWN ... Los Angeles 
NEWSPAPERS . . . regional MAGA- 
ZINES . . . OUTDOOR DISPLAYS 

in Los Angeles, San Diego and seven 
other cities. Plus . . . 

WINDSHIELD STICKERS, 50,000 of 
them tied in with lucky-number 

prizes. 

SKY SIGNS down over crowds at 
beaches, stadiums, parades. 

PROGRAM REMOTES from two mo- 
bile units in eight Southern Califor- 
nia counties. 

DIRECT MAIL answers to fan and 
contest letters enclosing station pro- 
motion. 

SIZZLE THE NATION'S HOTTEST 
MARKET WITH THAT HOT STA- 
TION FROM COOL CATALINA: KBIG. 




JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, California 
Telephone: HOIIywood 3-3205 

Nat. Rep. Robert Meeker & Assoc. Inc. 







Weymouth M. Symmes, Paris & Peart, New 
York, expects to buy more dm time tv announcements 
this fall than ever before. He feels that frequency 
discount offers make daytime tv among the most 
reasonable buys. "Furthermore, we have food clients, 
and daytime, of course, is the natural time for 
reaching women. I expect that our pattern will 
generally be one of buying 20-second announcements 
adjacent to network shows. In the past we have 
tested the pull of such programs as Today (NBC 
TV) by participating in it. Of course, viewing 
habits differ in different t ities, and we will fit our 
schedule into the pattern of housewives of a par- 
ticular locality. So far, early morning tv and 
2:00-4:00 p.m. feature film adjacencies look good." 



iff rs. Jean Henderer. Scott Henderson Adver- 
tising, Tucson, Ariz., has words to say about "crazx- 
mixed-up rate cards'' and the "inconsistent and 
poor information media provide." Says she: "It's 
up to the trade press and the re/js to educate tv 
and radio stations to advertise properly and get 
information out while it's hot. One step would be 
a standard rate card. Another and more important 
one from the station point of view would be more 
effective advertising." Adds she, the stations are 
appealing to the busiest and toughest audience — 
agencymen, Jean's own buying philosophy: "Today, 
radio stations can sell better if they offer 'produced" 
announcements. In tv, we prefer to look for 
good local shows and buy into them." 



George Huelder, Maxon, New York, feels that 
the threats of strikes in the hard goods industry 
and the resulting stepped-up production may be 
a boost to both spot radio and tv. "Many of these 
strikes won't come off, like the steel strike, for 
example. And manufat Hirers uill find themselves 
with huge inventories, continued high profits, and 
higher advertising budgets, to be used in short and 
concentrated periods particularly." His account, 
General Electric, is likely to go into spot radio 
with announcement schedules in late October or 
November. Says he: "We'll buy radio in low-satur- 
ated tv markets. Our choice will be early-morning, 
some evening in low-saturated tv markets, and a 
stress upon local personalities and live copy." 



SPONSOR 




This Morning 



...the great new personality show on KPIX which 

...has increased San Francisco viewing by 15% and KPIX ratings for its daily 8:30-9:30 period by 44% 

in its first month... 

...outstrips all competition as a sales weapon through personality selling... 

...combines the mirth and magicianship of Sandy Spillman, the housewifely chatter of Faye Stewart, 

the singing of pretty Patti Pritchard, with guests and games, interviews and innovations, in San Francisco's 

liveliest, sellingest local TV origination. 




your Kati man for the whole 
story or telephone Lou Simon 
at KPIX - PRospect 6-5 1 00 



NO NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SALES CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT 



CHAN 



IX 



WESTINGH 



CHANNEL 



5 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Affiliated tilth CBS Television Network 
Represented l>\ the Kat: Agency 



3USE BROADCASTING COMPANY. INC. 



r 




© 



WBZWBZA . WBZTV. Boifm 

KYW.WPTZ. /• ... 

KDKA • KDKA-TV. Ktlitmwgk 

WOWO I 

MX. (• „U,J 

*■' 

KPIX \ I 

II H - ': ApHCj 



25 JULY 1955 






B 







*- 



*JM 



1 









4 5 6 7 i 9 ; 

• t ft H 



2 



2 



il 



! • 

8 9 



_ 



e 9 






WITH A 

NEW KIND 

OF 

RATE CARD 

...FOR A 

NEW KIND OF 

RADIO 



Today there's a bigger difference than ever on Mutual — 
both in how much you get and how little you pay. 

Nowhere else will you get such powerful local impact — 
through a network fabric with all the strength of 
"hometown" radio . . . or such co verage -from- within 
of markets both with and without television . . . or 
such a big-audience "extra" in out-of-home listening. 

And nowhere will you find more for your money than 
in Mutual 's new rate card. You can now (for example) buy 
15 minutes on 557 stations for $2,970. Or a quarter-hour 
air-time cost for each station of only 



$5.34 



Or only 



•*/. 78 per commercial minute. Day or night. It's good value 
for Watertown or Waterbury. . . a bargain for Memphis or 
St. Jo. ..almost unbelievable for New York or Los Angeles. 

And it doesn't take a slide-rule to see how little 20 or 30 
seconds would cost! 



These low, low rates make Mutual the network of best buys 
in all radio today — for a sectional or national program, 
for maximum saturation, for large and small advertisers. 






And for you, too. Ask for a "reading" on Mutual 's new rate 
card. See how it gives your budget far more local sell — 
on the "plus" network . . . 

MUTUAL Broadcasting System 





/>£ A $297,000,000 
_ BONER! 

Recently an ad appeared 
in this magazine above our 
signature stating that we 
served "nearly a #3,000,000 
market." 

Of course, the figure 
should have read $300,- 
000,000. 







And that's an impressive 
figure . . . particularly when 
it represents the buying 
power of a captive audience 
living in an area surrounded 
by 7,000 to 9,000 foot moun- 
tains, natural physical bar- 
riers to outside radio and TV 
penetration. And too, per 
capita income of this area 
of Washington State is 16% 
above national average, and 
sales performance 160% 
above national average. 

Yes, our quoted market 
figure was a boner, . . . 
but time buyers don't pull 
boners when they buy KPQ! 





5000 WATTST" 

560 K.C. 
WENATCHEE 

WASHINGTON 

REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
Moore and Lund, Seattle, Wash. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

For joe and Co., Incorporated 

(One of the BIG 6 Forjoe represented stations of Washing- 
ton State) 




by Bob Foreman 
Compared to It?, print eopywriting is a sinecure 

Dear Eddie: 

It was good to get your letter though a bit disquieting to 
read that you have quit what I had always thought was a real 
fine agency job. Berths in a topnotch print-copy department 
are hard to come by these days, I hear. I gather you departed 
in high dudgeon and, if I understand them, your two big 
reasons were: 

a) because the agency was getting more and more research- 
minded forcing you old print thinker-uppers to look at some 
charts on occasion and 

b) because the agency has changed in the last few years 
and the account men have "gained the upper hand." 

You're gonna hate me, son, but my sympathies are on the 
other side. 

In my humble opinion, the print copywriter has too long 
been the most pampered phenom in the agency fold (some- 
thing I never realized till I escaped those warm waters and 
got dunked in television). 

It was only after I got away from print that I realized what 
a sinecure a copy job could be. In fact, I had to walk inside 
of a story-board factory to discover that the easiest way of 
life in the business is playing the role of "old-time copy 
genius." 

Then came the day of awakening. I was forced to learn 
the difference between a soft-edge wipe and a lap dissolve 
and along with this new vista I found out that the gents and 
ladies who thought up headlines and theme lines and sat with 
the art guys while they pushed their T-squares around on the 
big tissue pads had just about the cushiest job in the business. 

I, too, used to get incensed, as a print chap, when nattily 
dressed account men suggested that I alter a subhead or when 
some boob in the client's office questioned my choice of 
words. I often took that grand pose behind a closed door, 
feet on desk, and incommunicado while my wounded soul 
was allowed to heal so that I could expose it to the Philistines 
once more. 

Eddie, my friend, you ought to get into tv — if onlv for a 
month or so. It'll give you a chance to utilize that superb 
(Please turn to page 66) 



10 



SPONSOR 



Is This 

"COVERAGE"? 




VIDEODEX MAY, 1955 REPORT 

LINCOLN-LAND STUDY 

Southern Nebraska and Northern Kansas 

Summary Table — Average Ratings — % TV Homes 




KOLN-TV 


■•B" 


"C" 


••D- 


SUNDAY: 1:00— 5:00 P M. 
5:00—11:00 P.M. 

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY: 

1:00 — 5:00 P.M. 
5:00—11:00 P.M. 

SATURDAY: 1:00— 5:00 P.M. 

5:00 11:00 P.M. 

TOTAL: 1:00— 5:00 P.M. 

5 00—11 00 P M 


12.7 
17.9 

10.6 
19.8 

16.3 
21.0 

1 1.7 
19.7 


4.8 
8.4 

5.1 

9.4 

5.8 
10.8 

5.1 
9.5 


8.2 
9.5 

5.5 
9.0 

5.8 
9.8 

5.9 
9.2 


2.1 
3.3 

2.3 
2.8 

2.0 
2.9 

2.2 
2.9 






$ 



'is 




9ke ' J h/^t SMaUonb 

WKZO — KALAMAZOO 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAP10S-KALAMAZOO 

WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIOS-KALAUAZOO 

KOLN-TV — UNCOLN. NEIRASKA 

Associated wrtfc 
WMID — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



^4 



OU'RE HALF NAKED 1\ NEBRASKA COVERAG1 
IE VOL DON'T REACH LTNCOLN-LAND 12 counties 

\\ irh 2011.000 families — 125.000 undupticated b\ anj other 
station. The Videodex table Bhows thai kOl.N-'IA g< ste 
almost as many LINCOLN-LAND viewers a- the three other 
stations combined — both afternoon and night! 

The KOLN-TV tower i» 75 miles from Omaha! [his 
LINCOLN-LAND location i> farther removed from the 
Omaha market than is Cincinnati from Dayton, Buffalo 

from Rochester or Toledo from Detroit. 

Let A.very-Knodel i_ r i\c you all 1 1 1 « - facts on KOI VI \ 
the official CBS-ABC outlel lor Southern Nebraska and 

Northern Kansas. 

CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

KOLN-TV 



COVERS LINCOLN-LAND — NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET 



Avery-Knodel. Inc.. Exclusive National Representative & 



25 JULY 1955 



11 



MADISON 



SPONSOR unites letters to the editor. 
Address 40 E. 49 St., New York 17. 

P&G 

^ our very informative articles on 
how Proctor ^ Gamble operates were 
either wonderful oi might) dangerous. 
They leave me with a feeling that I 
know all about selling soaps. I found 
the series a wonderful course in a 
phase of advertising in which I have 
had no experience. 

If your articles have misled me, I 
wish some of the soap boys would 
write in and wise me up. 

Joseph Stom: 

V.P., Copy Dept. 

J. Walter Thompson 

New York 



FALL FACTS 

The mere size of your 11 July issue 
sort of overwhelmed me when it ar- 
rived yesterday, but I decided to read 
it over a nice long weekend. However, 
I took it home with me and decided to 
just glance through it after dinner. 

Well, you know the rest of the story. 
My "glance" lasted several hours and 
I marked section after section for still 
further study. 

Your corps of editors deserve the 
congratulations of the entire television 
industry for your excellent presenta- 
tion of such a mountain of important 
facts concerning the many facets which 
have developed, and which apparently 
are continuing to develop on an even 
greater scale, in the industry. 

Congratulations and best wishes for 
your further achievements in the work 
you have undertaken. 

R. R. Kaufman 
President 
Guild Films 
New York 



TIMEBUYERS' TIPS 

I thought that the recent feature on 
advice to young timebuyers was ex- 
cellently done. 

There was immediate reaction to it 
12 





RAIL 



oHio 



Horr»« 



ai strii»«^ rs : 



inc. 



rll «' 



V95S 



■■.%0^?. 1O ln Street 
VViU.' Ohio 



^^^^^^ -a har -,es 

^0^ „n 30 3i . vou ha« K to tal <* TLa 

s - 1 %>,anK3 to ™ , h Msl» stY :„cv.l to • u _ oroaaUili 



.^^^ on 3° oi . vou h0,,e 6 total °' ;. cd 
odvertvsi-.. nen aous ver«^ eL „,, have I" 1 

cess V ell'"* 6 .•;« assure y° u 
of V° ur Rainess- " e 

grateWl P 



Slncercl 



.„. •- i)0"'-^ -, mJv. 
»■» .er, Sales 



&V5i 



^< 



£J~ 



Buy any 2 of these stations and get a jj% dis: 

» ancf besf of a// « 

Buy any 3 or 4 of these stations and get a 1 fl 




BjfBjs 



WING 1 WCOL 



wiz: 



DAYTON 



COLUMBUS 



SPRINGFIER 



SPONSOR 







ETWORK.. 



When you sow on good soil, you reap a 
good harvest. The advertising coverage you 
have given us on Town View has borne tremendous 
results. A total of 98 sales for one week has both over- 
whelmed and pleased us . . . 

$1,100,000 in SALES 

for an investment of $500! 



uy Air Trails Network Stations write, wire or phone collect 

M Rep-Tentotives *,*** Williams 

Office fem WING 



Ni.-w York • Chicago 
los Angeles • San Francisco 



13 1 N. Main St. 
Dayton, Ohio • Hemlock 3773 



"gaziaap 



WCMI 



ATN 



CH14H0 • HUNTINGTON • IBONTQN 



Air Trails N 



RAILS NETWORK 



iii i lii- lii -i \M-.-k aftei publii at 
i |i .1-1 i dozen people told me thai 
thej li id -• en il ind thou 111 l 
\ i-i \ good. 

Bill Mailleferi 
Radio Sales !/</■ 
yard Peti ■ & < 

• BUI M.iii.i.n ii,. irtlrb 

1 'I' Oil I Inn l-u . n. - I i 

- In. li ippi ji. .1 .,, II,. J | J i| 



BUYERS GUIDE 

sponsor i- to be i ongratulated 
ill.- ex< eptional L955 Buyers' Guidt I 
espei iallj lik>- the added features in the 
i\ section and tin- breakdowns <>f spe- 
cialized 1. 1. In, .mil \\ . ] .mi < ertainl) 
going I., make _">o<| use of mj copj 
throughout the year. 

Pi ii i; \l. Baroai ii 

/ imebu \ et 

Foote, Cone A l!<-l</ini: 

Sew ) orl 



MUDDLED MIDDLES 

Please restore our sanit] post haste 
In chart three on page 23 "I pour 27 
June issue, aren't the "upper middle" 
and "lower middle" headings trans- 
posed? 

Its a urrat storj and we want t" 
<|iii>te it all over the pla< e, but we < ant 
figure "ut that chart 

ROBl i;i I.'"'. i RS 

President 

It (, l/.s 

// n,h.. D.C. 

• Boh Rogers *-. <if eonrse, complete]} right. 
Chart three in ihi- *ior\ titled "Does radio 
pl.i% thr urnni: music?* 1 hiitl tin- "tj|i|n<r middle" 

and lower middle* 1 headings, trans] .. . .1 fan rrmr 



CLAMORENE 

We recall having seen an arti< l> 
sometime during the past jrear in spon- 
sor "ii the subjet t .>t < rlamon ne, a 
product used in home < leaning "f 1 

W •■ would very much appreciate a 
tear sheet or the date and issue in 
which the article appeared so thai we 
can look it up ourseh - 

Dantj 1. H. Lewis 
/ 1 mint Executit t 
Charles R. s iuart Advert 
^nn / randsco 

• I hr artirlr on l.limorrnr apprarrtl in thr 

IS V.-.n.lirr !■».-, I i-.ur of SPONSOR. SPONSOR 
i. in.l.xr.l fc| «■— TJj Thr inrl.-* f„ r JnN- 

llrrrnil.rr 1 *».". t ipprirrH In ihr 2» Jinuir. i.-ur. 
par' 55. 



25 JULY 1955 





■/ 



ill 



25,000 fan letters 

hailed its TV sneak preview . . . 

now The Great Gildersleeve Comedy Series 

is ready to sell for YOU! 

"The Great Gildersleeve," top-rated comedy favorite on radio for 
13 years, is ready to open broad new sales opportunities for television 

advertisers. He's the same lovable, laughable Gildy -chortle and all— 
but with the tremendous added impact of television's visual values. 

"The Great Gildersleeve" just can't miss as a syndicated TV film 
series. It's pre-tested ! 

With no advance warning, "The Great Gildersleeve" was sneak- 
previewed in a half-hour period on the NBC Television Network. 
Viewers were asked to send in their reactions. No incentives were 
offered. From this single exposure more than 25,000 enthusiastic 
letters, many signed by every member of the family, clamored for 
Gildy as a regular TV attraction. They looked forward to weekly 
visits with Gildy, nephew Leroy, niece Marjorie, housekeeper Birdie, 
druggist Peavey, barber Floyd, Mayor Terwilliger, and all the 
other popular favorites of "The Great Gildersleeve." 

"The Great Gildersleeve" is a TV comedy series with extra-special 
values for advertisers : 

• a big-time, established, well-loved personality 

• a wholesome approach that appeals to the whole family and will 
serve to cement community relations for the sponsor 

• powerful backing by NBC Film Division's all-out 
merchandising 

• a pre-tested capacity for attracting and holding audience 

Act fast to make sure Gildersleeve cuts his comic capers in 
your behalf ...first! Write, wire or phone now! 

NBC FILM DIVISION 

serving all_ sponsors 

serving all stations 



30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 
Merchandise Mart, Chicago, 111. 
Sunset & Vine. Hollywood, Calif. 
In Canada: RCA Victor, 225 Mutual St., 
Toronto; 1551 Bishop St., Montreal. 




There's unanimity in Kansas City: 

No matter how you count the audience 
the no* 1 station is 



HERE IS THE WHB LEADERSHIP 


LINE-UP: 


FIRST FLACE— HOOPER 




Average share of audience 7 a.m. -6 
May-June, 1955 


p.m., Mon.-Fri., 


FIRST PLACE — PULSE 




Average share of audience, 6 a.m. -6 
March-April, 1955 


p.m., Mon.-Sat., 


FIRST PLACE — TREKIDEX 




Average share of audience, 8 a.m.-6 
Jan.-Feb., 1955 


p.m., Mon.-Fri., 




10,000 WATTS, 710 KC 

This is what Mid-Continent programming, ideas and ex- 
citement have achieved for WHB! All three national sur- 
veys— PULSE, HOOPER, TRENDEX— give WHB the 
top daytime spot with all-day average ratings as high as 
45.7% (Hooper) . So no matter what ratings you buy bv, 
your best Kansas City buy is WHB. Talk to the man from 
Blair or WHB General Manager George W. Arm trong. 



m 



•CONTINENT BROADCASTING COMPANY 



President: Todd Storz 

WTIX, New Orleans 

Represented by 
Adam J. Young, Jr. 



KOWH, Omaha 
Represented by 
H-R Reps., Inc. 



John Blair & Co. 

Represented by 
WHB, Kansas City 



J\ew and renew 



SNHSIt 



2 5 JULY 1955 



1. New on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


Amcr Tobacco. NY 


BBDO. NY 


CBS 


11 


Bcltonc Hearing Aid Co. Chi 


Oli.m 6 Bronncr, Chi 


ABC 


full net 


Hard Bishop. NY 


Raymond Spcctor. NY 


CBS 


206 


Hazel Bishop. NY 


Raymond Spcctor, NY 


CBS 


206 


Burton Dixie Corp. Chi 
CBS Columbia. NY 


Robt Wesley. Chi 
Ted Bates. NY 


ABC 
CBS 


90 
206 


Dow Chcm Co. Midland, Mich 
Famous Artists Schools, NY 


MacManus. John 

Adams. NY 
FC&B, NY 


CBS 
CBS 


206 
23 


Ccncral Motors Corp, Fisher 

Body Div, Dctr 
Cult Oil Corp, tor Culfspray, 

Pittsburgh 
Lincoln-Mercury Dealers, Dctr 


Kudncr, NY 
Y&R. NY 
K&E, NY 


NBC 
CBS 
CBS 


132 
37 


Murine Co, Chi 


BBDO. Chi 


CBS 


206 


Slccp-Ezc, SF 


M. B. Scott. W Hllydw 


CBS 


206 


Wm Wriglcy |r. Chi 


R & R, Chi 


CBS 


158 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Your Hit Parade. Sat 1030-11 pm; 25 June: 11 

wks 
Don McNeill s Breakfast Club; T 9 9 15 am; 13 

Sept. 52 wks 
Fred Robbins Show; M F 3 30-4 pm. 5 mm scg; 

1 Aug; 52 wks 
Wendy Warren & the News. M-F 12-1205 pm; 

•1 July; 52 wks 
Paul Haryey News; Sun 8-8 15 pm; 3 |uly; 52 wks 
Arthur Codfrcy Talent Scouts; alt M 8 30-9 pm ; 

27 July; 13 wks 
Arthur Codfrey Time; Th, every 4th F; 11-11 ; 1 S 

am; 16 July. 26 wks 
Calcn Drake Talk Scries; Sat 1045-55; 9 |uly; 

4 wks 
Fisher Body Craftsman's Cuild Scholarship Awards 

Dinner; T 9-9:30 pm; 2 Aug only 
Wendy Warren & The News; M-F 12:05-12:10 

pm; 6 July: 8 wks 
Charles Collingwood; M F 5-5:15 pm; POST; 4 

July; 9 wks 
Arthur Codfrey Time; alt T W 10-10:15 am; 22 

July; 4 wks 
Young Dr Malonc; 'half) T. Th 1 30-1 45 pm, 

19 July; 58 wks 
Howard Miller Show; M-F 11:45-12 noon; 18 

July; 52 wks 




Burt 
Lamb' ■ 




Jones 
Scovcrn ' 3 * 



2. Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 


AGENCY 


STATIONS 


PROGRAM, time, start, duration 


Amcr Oil Co, Bait 


Jos Katz, Bait 


CBS 83 


Edward R. Murrow with the News; MWF 7:45-8 
pm; 27 June; 5 wks 


Coca Cola Co, NY 


D'Arcy, NY 


MBS 173 


Coke Time; T Th 7:45-8 pm; 5 July; 52 wks 


Hawaiian Pineapple. SF 


N. W. Aycr, NY 


CBS 174 


Houseparty; M 3:15-3:30 pm; 29 July; 52 wks 


Firestone Tire & Rubber Co, Akron 


Sweeney & James, Clevc 


ABC 348 


Voice of Firestone; M 8:30-9 pm; 13 June; 52 wks 



3. Broadcast Industry Executives 




Arnold 
Benson 3 > 



NAME 


FORMER AFFILIATION 




NEW AFFILIATION 


Sidney P. Allen 


MBS. NY. E sis mgr 




Same, vp in chg sis for E div 


Harold B. Arkoff 


KMA, Shenandoah, rcgl sis mgr 




Same, sis mgr 


John Bibcock 


New Idea Farm Equipment Co, Cin, 


sis prom mgr 


Crosley Bcstg. Cin, dir of Town & Country Div 


Perry Bascom 


WOR-TV. NY, acct exec 




Same, asst ?ls mgr 


Nick Basso 


WSAZ, Huntington, W Va, r-tv news 


dir 


Same, dir of news and publ rcls 


Armin N Bender 


WHAM, Rochester, asst to tv sis mgr 




Same, tv sis mgr 


Arnold Benson 


CBS R Spot Sis, NY, sis prom & adv 


dept 


Same, dir of stns prom scrv 


Alfred C. Booker 


Stokes Inst, Newark, sis mgr 




WAAT, Newark, acct exec 


Stephen F. Booth 


Pontiac Press. Pontiac, Mich, feature 


editor 


WW) iTV), Detr, publ mgr 


Francis L. Boyle Jr 


WJR. Dctr, sis rep 




Same, local sis mgr 


Alan Brcss 


KCEN-TV, Temple, Tex 




Stars Natl. NY, acct exec 


James P. Brown 


KBTV. Denver, natl sis mgr 




KOSI, Denver, comml mgr 


Jack C. Brussel 


WJR. Dctr.. sis rep 




Same, adv & sis prom mgr 


Ed Burch 


KOA-TV. Denver, local sis stf 




KBTV, Denver, local sis stf 


|ohn B. Burns 


ABC Film. Chi. mid-west mgr 




Same. NY, dir of natl sis 


Robert L. Callahan 


NATvAdv. Clenn Falls. NY, gen sis mgr 


WLW-C, Columbus, acct exec 


Virgil Cory 


TWA. publ mgr 




KBTV, Denver, acct exec 


Richard M. Day 


KEYD, Mnnpls, sis man 




Same, local tv sis mgr 


William P. Dix 


WOR. NY, sis mgr 




Same, also tv sis mgr 


John Dodge 


NBC TV. NY. E admin sis mgr 




Same. E sis mgr 


John Donahue 


Information Unlimited, natl sis & res 


org, Detr 


MBS. Detr, sis 


Nat V. Donato 


ABC Film. NY. Canadian rep 




Same, also E sis mgr 


Robert M. Dooley 


CBS R Spot Sis. NY, sis dev rep 




Same, acct exec 


John Eckstien 


WABC (TV), NY, supvr adv & prom 




ABC. NY. asst to dir of adv. prom & publ 


Paul B. Evans 


NBC Spot Sis, Chi, sis exec 




Storer, Chi, midwest r sis mgr 


Jack Fields 


ABC. NY. exploitation writer 




Same, chf, exploitation unit 


Wally Foxal 


KHOL-TV. Kearney. Nebr. acct exec 




Same, asst sis mgr 


Pete Franklin 


Wm & Mary Alumni Assoc, dir of pu 


jl rcls 


WVEC-TV. Norfolk, prom & mdsg dir 


Hardic Friebcrg 


TPA. NY. E sis mgr 




Same, vp in chg E div 


Avery Gibson 


H-R Reps. NY, asst prom dir 




Same, dir of res 


Ceorge Crecnwood 


KELO-TV. Sioux Falls, S.D., acct exec 




WNAX. Yankton. SD. prom dir 


Art Cross 


Cuild. NY. hd. client service 




Same, asst gen sis mgr 


Willard Hasbrook 


KFSD. San Diego, gen mgr 




KFXM. San Bcrnadino. prcs & gen mgr 


Chuck Henderson 


NBC Film. NY. dir of publ 




NBC. NY. mgr of field exploitation 


Don Hunter 


S. W. Anderson, Chi. sis engineer 




WFBM-TV, Indpls. acct exec 


Ceorge E. Hurst 


KMOX, St. Louis. E sis rep 




CBS R Spot Sis. NY, contact man 


Frederick Jacobi 


NBC Film. NY, press mgr 




Same, mgr of publ 


Dick Jackson 


WOR (TV), NY. mgr of publ 




Same, dir of publ rels 


C. Pete Jaeger 


Transamcrican Bcastg Corp. exec vp 




Cuild. NY. vp. natl sis 




David C 
Taft 131 




Robert 
Rcuschlt 3' 



In next issue: Mew and Renewed on Television (Neticork) ; Advertising Agency Personnel Changes; 
Sponsor Personnel Changes; Station Changes (reps, network affiliation, potcer increases) 




Bob 
Callahan 3> 



25 JULY 1955 



17 



2 5 JULY 1955 



.Yfir and renew 



Dick 
Jackson 13) 




Nick 
Basso (3) 




Robert 
Schlinkert (3) 




Marvin 
Rosenc (3) 




Hardie 
Frieberg (3) 




Robert C. 

Wood (3) 




NAME 



|r 



Charles W. Johnson 
Lewis P. Johnson 
Jack Keiner 
William E. Kellcy 
Don Kerr 
Ceorge Klayer 
William Koblcnzer 
Bcnnet Korn 
Burt Lambert 
John B. Lanigan 
Carroll Marts 
Sam K. Maxwell 
John T. McHugh 
Bill Morgan, Jr 
Ceorge H. Morris 
L. Boyd Mullins 
Robert C. Murdock 
Kenneth E. Peterson 
Charles R. Philips 
John R. Porterfield 
Roger Read 
Cary Reamse 
Robert M. Reuschle 
Raymond E. Roberts 
Marvin L. Rosene 
John D. Scheuer Jr. 



Robert Schlinkert 
Jones Scovern 
Al Seton 
Neil Searles 
Jack Sebastian 
Frank J. Shea 
Chick Showerman 
Cene Sink 
Donald C. Softness 
Peter Storer 

C. Paschall Swift 
David C. Taft 
Frank A. Tessin 
Russ Truesdell 
John R. Urba 
Vincent T. Wasilewskl 
Roman W. Wassenberg 
William H. Weintraub 

Jr 
Robert C. Wood 
Al Yallen 



:ast Industry Executives (continued) 


FORMER AFFILIATION ( 


NEW AFFILIATION 


KROW, Oakland, sis 


KSFO, SF, sis stf 


Storer, Chi 


Same, midwest tv sis rngr 


Allen b Reynolds Adv, Omaha, asst dir r-tv 


Edward Petry, NY, asst mgr prom & sis dev, r 


Storer, NY, sis exec 


Same, E tv sis mgr 


WCTH (TV), Hartford, sis mgr 


WCOP, Boston, gen sis exec 


CBS TV, Chi, midwest sis mgr 


Same, E sis mgr 


DuMont, NY, E sis mgr 


Same, sis mgr net and "Electronicam" prod services 


Remington Records, NY, vp 


DuMont, NY, gen sis exec 


Ziv, NY sis mgr 


DuMont, NY, supvr of sis, o&o stns 


NBC TV, NY, E sis mgr 


Same, daytime sis mgr 


MBS, Chi, dir central div 


Same, also vp 


CBS TV, NY, acct exec 


Same, midwest sis mgr 


Joseph Katz, Bait, sr vp 


Same, also mgr, NY office 


KCKO, Dallas, exec 


KLIF, Dallas, sis mgr 


KNBC, Kansas City, acct exec 


WCTV(TV), Hartford, gen sis mgr 


KRON-TV, SF, prom dept 


Same, mdsg & res mgr z 


KSL, SLC, asst to prom mgr 


Same, secy-treas 


Upper Miss R Assoc, 3 Sin Croup, gen sis mgr 


KSTP, Mnnpls, r sis stf 


WOR-TV, NY, sis mgr 


Edward Petry, NY, sis dev dept mgr 


WCLV, Easton, Pa, gen mgr 


Storer, E r sis mgr 


WKRC-TV, Cin, asst sis mgr 


Same, local sis mgr 


Maxwell House Div, Cen Foods, Kansas City, sis man 


KCMO, Kansas City, sis rep 


WHUM (TV), Reading, Pa., natl sis mgr 


WLAC-TV, Nashville, natl sis mgr 


Future mag, editor 


KBTV, Denver, acct exec 


KSTP (TV), gen sis mgr 


Same, vp in chg sis 


KTVI, St. Louis 


Triangle Pubis, Phila, dir of publ rels & programs 




(WFIL (TV), Phila; WNBF (TV), Binghamto 




50%, WHCB, Harrisburg.) 


WKRC-TV, Cin, gen sis mgr 


Same, also asst to gen mgr 


Free & Peters, NY, vp & E sis mgr 


Same, bus mgr 


ABC, NY, trade news editor 


Same, asst mgr of publ 


WFOX, Milw, sis mgr 


WMIL, Milw, gen mgr 


NBC, NY, press dept 


Same, Film Div, supvr of exploitation 


John Sutherland Prods, NY, dir of sis 


Pelican Films, NY, vp in chg sis 


WTVW, Milw, WISN, Milw, gen mgr 


Same, also res vp, Hearst Corp 


WLOS-TV, Asheville, regl sis mgr 


James S. Ayers, Charlotte, mgr 


DuMont TV, NY, publ 


H-R Reps, NY, dir of prom 


CBS Spot Sis, NY, acct exec 


WACA-TV, Atlanta, WBRC-TV, Birmingham, 




NY natl sis mgr 




WCR-TV. Buffalo, sis mgr 


Radio Cin, exec vp 


Same, also WKRC-TV, Cin, gen mgr 


Headley-Reed, SF, mgr 


Free & Peters, SF 


KCSJ-TV, Pueblo, Col, program & film dir 


Same, gen mgr 


KTTV, LA, sis mgr 


Same, vp in chg sis 


NARTB, Wash, chief attorney 


Same, mgr of govt rels 


KTVU, Stockton, Calif, gen mgr 


KSFO, SF, gen mgr & exec vp 


Wm. H. Weintraub, NY, r-tv prods 


MBS, NY, prog sis mgr 


Storer, Chi, midW sis mgr 


Same, NY, natl sis mgr 


KMPT-TV, Okla City 


KCMJ, Palm Springs, Calif., gen exec 



4. New Firms, New Offices, Changes of Address 



Hiram Ash Adv, NY; Irwin B. Engelmore Adv, NY; have 
merged to form Ashe & Engelmore Adv with expanded 
quarters at 244 Madison, NY. 

James S. Ayers Co, Atlanta agency, opened branch at 127 W 
Seventh Street, Charlotte, NC, FRanklin 5-6146. 

Merritt H. Barnum, new adv & sis prom agency, 6 N Michi- 
gan Avenue, Chicago. 

Elan-Porter Productions, new firm, produces commercial, in- 
dustrial & tv feature films; 19 West 45th Street, NY 

Carlos A. Franco, former gen sis mgr of Crosley Bcstg, has 
resigned to form an adv, mktg & res consultant firm, 
Carlos Franco Assoc, with offices at 420 Madison Avenue, 
NY, PLaza 8-0792 

Hicks & Creist, NY, has moved to the Amoco Building, 555 
Fifth Avenue, MUrray Hill 7-5600. 



Joseph Katz Co, NY, has moved to the Amoco Building, 555 

Fifth Avenue, MUrray Hill 7-0250. 
Robert Lawrence Prods, NY, producers of tv film commer- 
cials, sis training and institutional motion pictures, has 

established a Canadian subsidiary in Toronto; John Ross, 

gen mgr of the offce. 
Reingold Co, Adv, Boston hs moved to 69 Newbury Street; 

KEnmore 6-3900. 
High Rikcr Adv, Albuq, NM and Prince-Alex Adv have 

merged to form Riker & Prince Adv with offices at 316 

Simms Building, Albq, NM. 
Ruthrauff & Ryan's Houston office is moving to larger 

quarters: Suite 307, Old National Insurance Bldg., 515 

Fannin Street. 
WOKY, Milw, has moved to 522 W Wisconsin Avenue, BRoad- 

way 1-8480. 



5. New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 


PRODUCT (or service) 


Armour & Co, Chi 


Canned meat div 


Bon Ami, NY 


Cleanser 


Campana Sis, Batavia, III. 


Italian balm, Solitair, Magic Touch, Sheer 




Magic 


Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City 


Glance shampoo (new product) 


Ceneral Motors, Frigidaire Div, Detr 


Air conditioning, commercial refrigeration 


B. F. Coodrich, Phila 


Retail stores 


Greve Labs, St. Louis 


Bromo Quinine 


Crovc Labs, St. Louis 


New proprietary drug products 


S. C. Johnson & Son, Racine, Wise. 


Beautifier 


S. C. Johnson & Son, Racine, Wise 


Electric Polisher-Scrubber, (new product); 




paste wax; jubilee wax 


S. C. Johnson & Son, Racine, Wise 


Clo-coat, Pride, industrial & maintenance 




products 


Lee Co, Kansas City 


Work & play clothes 


Magnavox Cs, Ft. Wayne, Ind 


Radio-phonographs, tv, electronic devices 


Manhattan Coffee, St Louis 


Dining Car coffee 


Nestle, White Plains 


Nestle's Instant Coffee 


NY, New Haven & Hartford RR, New Haven 


Railroad 


Studebaker-Packard, South Bend 


Studebaker cars & trucks 


Taylor-Reed Corp, Clenbrook, Conn 


Q-T Frosting mixes, cocoa marsh 



AGENCY 



Tatham-Laird, Chi 

Norman, Craig & Kummel, NY (Fi 

merly Wm. H. Weintraub) 
Fletcher D. Richards, NY 

Cunningham & Walsh, NY 

Kircher, Helton & Collett, Dayton 

W. S. Roberts, Phila 

Benton & Bowles, NY 

Dowd, Redfield & Johnstone, NY 

Foote. Cone & Belding, Chi 

Benton & Bowles, NY 

Needham, Louis & Brorby, Chi 

Crey Adv, NY 

Foote, Cone & Belding, NY 

Rutledge & Lilienfeld, St. Louis 

McCann-Erickson, NY 

Doyle Dane Bernbach, NY 

Benton & Bowles, NY 

Hicks & Creist. NY 



18 



SPONSOR 



Defi" 1 



telY 



the 
1 



in the 










Ljyracuse is now ranked ftoier 
ica's llest Test Market h> Sales 
Management Magazine. I lie 
ranking is authentic/ because it 
is based on an audited stud) of 
503 test campaigns bj leading 
national advertisers over a nine 
year period. 



By anthentir standards, WSYR 
Radio and WSYH Television are 
dearly the superior broadcasting 
services in the Syracuse market. 



Best physical facilities . . . best 
local programming services . . . 
best customer services . . . these 
important advantages give the 
WSYIt Stations their distinct 
leadership in Syracuse and 
throughout the $2 billion Central 
New York market. 



NBC 



AFFILIATES 






1 00 KW 
CHANNEL 3 

Represented Nationally by 
HARRINGTON, RIGHTER AND PARSONS, Inc. 



RADIO 



5 KW 
570 KC 



Represented Nationally by 
The HENRY I. CHRISTAL CO., Inc. 



SYRACUSE 



N 



25 JULY 1955 



19 



Milwaukee's 

here's why: 





"the voice 
of the 



BRAVES 



J) 



(the Milwaukee Braves 
gomes are not televised) 



m-fm 




&?, 



all-star 
programming 



Milwaukee's 

Most Powerful 

Independent 



24 hours 

of music 

news, sports 



50QO 



lowest cost 
per thousand 



HUGH BOICE, JR. 

Gen. Mgr. 

HEADLEY-REED, 

National Rep. 




Robert Strumpen-Darrie 

President 
Berlitz Schools of Languages, New Yorlc 



Robert Strumpen-Darrie, president of Berlitz Schools of Lan- 
guages, feels somewhat sheepish when forced to admit he speaks only 
four languages. "But Charlie Berlitz (v.p. and son of the founder) 
speaks 25 or 26," he quickly added for sponsor's benefit. 

"I suggested radio advertising to some of our 27 schools in the 
country," Strumpen-Darrie continued matter-of-factly. "And I must 
say that it's been quite successful in most cases." 

These cases include New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Miami, 
Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston and White Plains. Berlitz' 
agency, Calkins & Holden, generally buys minutes on the high-priced 
music independent in each market. Commercials use a sophisticated 
approach. 

"The travel curve ffhd Berlitz business curve are usually similar," 
said Strumpen-Darrie, "And travelers are generally people who like 
music." 

Music lovers in the chosen markets are being told between five 
and 10 times weekly that "ya vass lewblew," "io ti amo," and "ich 
liebe dich," are likely to get them involved in a rather torrid ro- 
mance with a Russian, Italian or German. The results of these 
commercials have been good, and today some 50 r V of Berlitz's total 
advertising budget is in radio. Some markets, like Philadelphia, 
Boston and Chicago are 100% radio. 

"An ever-increasing part of our business comes from institutions 
and corporations. For example, Standard Vacuum is one of our 
good customers," Strumpen-Darrie explained. "However, industries 
tend to move to the suburbs nowadays. Besides, we would also like 
to attract the suburban housewives. The whole pattern of school 
location may change." 

Just a few months ago, Strumpen-Darrie, a Westchester resident, 
opened up a new school in White Plains; it could be he was 
prompted in part by the fear his three children might otherwise 
follow in his footsteps and grow up knowing only four languages. 

"I asked my wife to bring them to New York to learn French," 
said he. "Thev do get lessons for free. But my wife said she cer- 
tainly wouldn't travel this far. Now can you imagine how the 
other suburban women feel about coming into the city. I mean 
the ones who'd have to pay?" * * * 



20 



SPONSOR 




BIGGER 



The 1955 Sales Management 
Figures Show That The WTVJ 
South Florida Market Area 
Has Increased 10.9% In Pop- 
ulation Over 1954. 

Retail Sales Are Keeping Pace 
... UP 8.9% To An All Time 
High Of $1,477,290,000. 

WTVJ NOW DELIVERS YOUR SALES 
MESSAGE TO 7,785,200 PERSONS 
-363,600 FAMILIES. 



Basic Affiliate 



WTVJ is the ONLY TV Station 
giving you complete cover- 
age of the Fabulous South 
Florida Market. 

CONTACT YOUR FREE & 
PETERS COLONEL NOW 



MIAMI # 

FLORIDA'S FIRST TELEVISION STATION 
100,000 Watts Power— 1,000 ft. Tower 



25 JULY 1955 



She's one of 1,000,000 
potential customers 
for your products... 




She S one of 1,000,000 Span- 
ish-speaking Mexican-Ameri- 
cans in the Texas Spanish Lan- 
guage Network coverage area 
who speak Spanish, read Span- 
ish, listen to Spanish-language 
radio-but, BUY AMERICAN! 
With special emphasis on prod- 
ucts brought to their attention 
through Spanish-language radio. 
When you buy the TSLN you 
get outstanding stations in their 
areas .There are no weak links 
in the TSLN. 



TEXAS SPANISH 
LANGUAGE NETWORK 

KIWW XEO-XEOR XEJ 

San Antonio Rio Grande El Paso 
Valley 

Represented nationally by 

NATIONAL TIMES SALES 

New York • Chicago 

HARLAN G. OAKES & ASSOC. 

Los Angeles • San Francisco 




by Joe Csida 
The Sarnoff-Folsotn-TVeaver-yuts combination 

A couple of weeks ago I was about to take my seat on the 
9:06 L.I.R.R. train out of Manhasset, when across the aisle 
I spotted Pat Weaver. With the kind of publicity Pat has 
been getting of recent months it's hardly necessary to iden- 
tify him here as Sylvester P. W., president of NBC. Pat's 
schedule is obviously such these days that I wouldn't impose 
by trying to see him too frequently so I leaped at the oppor- 
tunity to join him for the 45 minutes it takes to ride from 
Manhasset to Penn Station. 

Pat was reading the Times, the Trib, the News and the 
Mirror, not all at once, of course, but the very next thing to 
all at once. He'd boarded the train at Port Washington so 
he'd already finished two of the papers. It was the morning 
the Times' Jack Gould had the piece about one of the fee tv 
proponents touting the idea of a channel carrying two pro- 
grams at the same time, and utilizing one of these for free 
and the other for fee video. 

Pat and I both read the story and began to discuss it. 
"Sure," Pat said, "that's multiplex, and inevitably it will 
be developed. It's a pure matter of electronics, and theo- 
retically quite simple, for a single channel to carry two 
programs at one and the same time. I'd say the engineers 
and scientists should have it readv in roughly five years." 

As always, I was fascinated with Pat's incredible knowl- 
edge and his easy facility for thinking big. I get as much 
of a kick as the next guy out of reading about Mr. W's bongo 
board, and the swimming pool and the field glasses, handv 
for observing passing birdlife. But what I am particularly 
enchanted with is the solid base underneath this top layer 
of showmanly trimmings. I do not believe that it has yet 
been said that what Pat brings to NBC (and consequent v 
to television as a whole) is, on the showmanship and sales- 
manship levels, exactly the same commodities General Sar- 
noff has for years brought to the RCA on scientific and engi- 
neering levels, and what RCA president Frank Folsom ha« 
brought to the corporation on manufacturing and merchan- 
dising levels. 

These commodities are, first, virtually unlimited vision; 
and secondly, the guts and physical and mental energy to 
fight for a new idea, no matter how much opposition such 
an idea may encounter initially. I had the good fortune to 
be working for Frank Folsom at the time RCA Victor intro- 
( Please turn to page 71) 



22 



SPONSOR 



WAVE 



vith 



I you don't buy the tree 

fOU BUY THE SYRUP! 



WAVE gives you the sweetest part of Kentucky — 
and at a price that's sweet, too! 

MORE THAN LOUISVILLE -*- LESS THAN THE STATE! 
WAVE's 50% daytime coverage area almost exactly parallels 
the 27-county Louisville Trading Area. (42.5^- of the State's 
total Effective Buying Income is concentrated in this one 
important market!) 

SPARKLING PROGRAMMING — NETWORK AND LOCAL! 
WAVE is the ONLY NBC station in or near Louisville. 
We invest heavily in local programming, too. Our radio staff alone 
numbers 62 people, with more than 70% of them devoting 
themselves to on-the-air activities, exclusively. 

Don't buy the Maple tree — buy the syrup. NBC Spot Sales 
has the figures. 



WAVE 
LOUISVILLE 



5000 WATTS 
NBC AFFILIATE 




MM1 SPOT SAIJES 



National Representatives 



V/i \W^5\\^ wk\ Vm'W 






Uumi j mmTEpTp 



K I N e S I Z E 



F A C I L I T I E S 



wtyv 




In the Carolinas, advertisers find many types of TV 
facilities . . . but only on one station, WBTV, can the 
advertiser get complete, Kingsize Facilities. 

Here, in WBTV's new $1,250,000 home with 51,000 
square feet of floor space, are TV studios measuring 
40' x 40' and 40' x 60', each wired for three black-and- 
white and two color cameras, each accommodating 
Kingsize studio audiences . . . the last word in engineering 
equipment . . . art and carpenter shops for designing and 
building any type of scenery . . . three ultra-modern 
darkrooms . . . dual facilities for transmitting color and 
black-and-white slides and films . . . Kingsize executive, 
program, production, engineering, news, sales, business, 
promotion and merchandising departments. 

Conditioned by 33 years of broadcast leadership, 
WBTV planned big . . . built big. Now more than ever, 
WBTV is your first, biggest step to TV coverage of the 
two Carolinas. 



THIS WE fight roi« 



25 JULY 1955 



WE FIGHT F6R REGULAR PUBLICATION 
OFSPOTTV VM) RADIO I AIMvMHIl HI S OF 
COMPANIES COMPARABLE in FIG1 RES U Ml - 
ABLE FOR \IJ, OTHER MAJOR MEDIA. 
WE BELIEVE THAT MAM \l)\ ERTISERS W II I 

FAIL TO RECOGNIZE THE STAR RE OF THE 
SPOT MEDIA UNTIL SPOT SPENDING COMES 01 I 
IN THE OPEN. THIS CAN HI HI ADVERTISERS 
AS WELL AS THE BROADCAST INDUSTRY. 




TO/NT 



w 



i\ M'(nv(«'> n. i iron st 

FOK SPONSOR'S COVI'l.tlt. uilliniiii riiilnKM -/ / 

a b i ii.ii i hih 

p tCM 92 




Let's bring SPOT 
SHUN out in the open 

Everyone wants spot figures like those of other major media 
hut progress has been slow. Upeoming: two new efforts 



Imong sponsor's editorial objectives is to stimulate publication of both spot television 

<ind radio dollar figures Reports like the one which follows appear regularly in SPONSOH to 

aid in the fight for the facts the advertiser needs to make fullest use <>i the spot media. 

M- his fall will see a renewed drive in the 20-year effort to uncover the biggesl secret in 
advertising: spot radio spending. It will be a two-pronged pu>h. directed al two different 
sourees. The Radio Advertising Bureau will undertake a mail and phone barrage aimed at 
unearthing information from a cro — ection of the nation's radio -i.it ion-. In an unrelated 
effort, Executives Radio-Tv Service, publishers of Spot Radio Report, will make an intensive 
canvass of the important air agencies. 

There's a do-or-die air about these twin efforts for the history of radio i- strewn with 
examples of people who tried to tunnel into the underworld of spot spending and found them- 
selves balked by excessive lethargy on the part of stations, obsessive secrecy on the part of 
advertisers — and that even more deadly barrier to action: Pll-do-it-if-my-competitor-does-it 
Seldom have so many people agreed that a certain course of action was desirable without 



SPOT SPENDING OUT IN OPEN (Continued) 

doing am tiling about it. 

Ironical, too, is t lie fad that so 
much effort is made t<> get spot figures 
— both radio and t\ the hard way. 
While agreeing thai publication of 
complete ~|><>i data would make things 
a lot easier, the ad agencies neverthe- 
Ic — continue their lime-consuming 
cloak-and-d; ■ er efforts to dig up what 
the competition is doing almost as if 
the) enjoyed it. This contradiction 
can he explained b) the all-too-human 
belief at each agenc) that it can 
pla) a better game of hide-and-seek 
than the other fellow. 

Nevertheless, the wear\ complaint of 



one timebu\ing executive (a P&G 
man. no less I echoes what a lot of his 
colleagues feel about this dilemma: 
"Life would sure be easier for me if all 
the figures were published. We spend 
an awful lot of time on competitive 
checking. There's a bad side to all 
this emphasis on what somebody else 
is doing. It makes you pay too much 
attention to the other guy and not 
enough to \our own problems." 

sponsor itself plunged into the 
murky fog of radio-tv spot spending 
in gathering spot spending figures of 
major advertisers for its Fall Facts 
Basics issue ( 11 July). While SPONSOR 
encountered much of the secrecy- 



QUOTES ON SPOT FIGURES PROBLEM 
FROM THREE TRADE ASSOCIATION LEADERS 




KEVIN SWEENEY 

President, Radio Advertising Bureau 

"The effort being made by SPONSOR 
to uncover spot spending is com- 
mendable and its publication of 
spot figures (11 July issue) is a step 
in the right direction . . . what we need 
now is an official industry method of 
gathering these figures. RAB is going 
to make a college try for them 
this fall." 



OLIVER TREYZ 

President, Television Bureau of Advertising 

"The release of information about spot 
spending is badly needed. I think 
SPONSOR provided an important 
service in highlighting the problem 
and compiling estimates. However, 
a lot more needs to be done in making 
spot tv expenditures available and in 
pointing up the rapidly increasing 
activity in the medium." 



LAWRENCE WEBB 

Managing Director 

Station Representatives Association 

"There is no question in my mind but 
that publication by SPONSOR of spot 
figures will be a help in spotlighting 
the need for a regular survey of 
spot spending. Though SPONSOR 
could not publish figures for all 
advertisers, it was an admirable 
pioneering job." 



laden atmosphere in which the agen- 
cies operate, the data obtained indi- 
cated that where enough effort is made 
spot figures can be brought to light 
and thus cast doubt upon whether any 
advertiser can hide his spot spending 
if his competitor really wants to find 
out how much it i>. 

sponsor's spot figures proved, if 
proof be needed, that spot is a major 
ad medium and that the conventional 
ranking of advertisers according to 
network, newspaper and magazine 
spending only can be misleading. 
Many of sponsor's figures on spot ra- 
dio and tv are the first to be published. 

sponsor gathered figures on the 
"top 100" advertisers ranked accord- 
ing to network and magazine spending 
i from PIB) and newspaper spending 
I from the AXPA Bureau of Advertis- 
ing). Spot radio figures were gotten 
for 42 clients, while spot tv figures 
were gotten for 40. Of course, not 
all of the "top 100" use spot radio 
and tv in their selling. Rorabaugh 
Report was the basis of some spot tv 
figures. SPONSOR concentrated its ef- 
forts on the big ad spenders, was able 
to get nearlv all the figures for the top 
20. 

An example of how misleading the 
PIB-ANPA expenditure ranking can 
be is Brown & Williamson, one of the 
Big Six tobacco manufacturers. B&W's 
gross time and space billings in news- 
papers, magazines, network radio and 
network tv came to a little over S4 
million last year, putting it No. 61 ac- 
cording to PIB-ANPA ranking. How- 
ever, B&W spent $8 million in spot ra- 
dio and tv in 1954 for all its tobacco 
products (notably Viceroy, Kool and 
Raleigh cigarettes), or twice as much 
as it spent in all other media. This 
figure is equal to sponsor's estimate 
of what all the divisions of General 
Motors spent on spot radio and tv last 
> ear, including co-op expenditures. Yet 
GM spent 18 times as much money in 
the other consumer ad media as B&W. 

Among sponsor's published figures 
were at least 15 advertisers who spent 
$2 million or more in spot radio and 
tv last year. They are, in order of 
spending: P&G, $12.25 million; Ford, 
$9 million; General Motors, $8 mil- 
lion; B&W, S8 million; Chrysler, $7.5 
million; Sterling Drug, S5.5 million; 
Colgate, 84.75 million; Miles Labora- 
tories, $4 million Coca-Cola, $4 mil- 
lion; R. J. Reynolds, S3. 5 million; 
American Home Products. S3 million; 

{Please turn to page 86) 

SPONSOR 





BALLOT 






For «(f managers, in<»(fi<i directors ami national representative! 

The questionnaire-ballol below is designed to belp provide iln- basic facta needed in 
order to launch a regular report on dollar expenditures l>\ companies in spot television and 
radio. Ii is addressed to three segments ol air advertising: i<> advertising managers; to 
media directors and timebuyers in agencies; and to national representatives. I rom the answers 
sponsor hope- to provide guidance for all concerned as to the besl method "i solving ili«- 
problem. Please clip tin- ballot and mail to sponsor al 10 E. 1*>th St., New \<nk 17. N. "> . 



1 



HOW Witll.l) YOU SUGGEST THAT TELEVISION AND RADIO SPOT EXPENDITURES m COMPANIES 
RE HADE V\ MLABLE? (CHECK ONE OF METHODS BELOW OR WHITE IN SUGGESTION) 

□ Through advertising agencies who would release spot figures 
of clients periodically to an industry or private organization. 

□ Directly through advertisers on the same basis. 

□ Through national representatives on the same basis. 

□ Through station- on the same basis. 



2 



WHO SHOULD UNDERTAKE THE JOB OF COMPILING SPOT EXPENDITURE FIGURES? 

] A trade organization or organizations such as TvB and RAB. 

Q A private organization or organizations such as N. C. Rorahaugh Report 
or Executives Radio-Tv Service. 

□ An independent organization to be set up by the industix. 



3 



IN WHAT FORM DO YOU THINK IT MOST PRACTICAL FOR SPOT DOLLAR FIG! Rl - PO RE ISS1 I l> NOW? 

□ Quarterly by companies. □ Annually by companies. Annually by brands. irterly by brands. 



1 



IN YOUR OPINION ARE THERE VALID REASONS FOR COMPANIES TO KM P SPOl I XP1 ND1 II KI - 
SECRET — IF THEY ARE ISSUED TO COVER QUARTERLY OR iNNI M PERIODS U Rl ID1 PASS! DI 



our name. 



.Title 



.Company. 



NOTE: All information given in this questionnaire will be considered confident 
eipress permission. If you may be quoted on your opinions check here 



3 ONSOR and your name and company name will not be quoted unless with 





"Lucy" tins calletl a failure 

far Phillip Mar r is but same shau? 

helpe€l muhe PJt 9 s 3Marlbara ... 

Fastest-growing filter-tip 



28 



SPONSOR 



^W MARLBORO IS no. 3 nltei dp bo* whew 

'.hi, I'M exect believe. Commerciali In 

( K-> l\ "Lucy" .t > i • 1 spot li were important 

in quick ii-'-. Shown (L i" r.i around tales 

rli. hi: Roger Greene, I'M .ill director; Ron 

Millhiser, M.ull brand manager; II. W. 

Cbealej li., I'M \ . | .. ; Owen Smith, accounl 
niperviaor al Leo Burnett, Marlboro agenc] 



Mlt t( itemenl reigns al LOO Park Ave- 
nue these days, and the graph in the 
picture at left tells why. tne sales 
curve thai continues t" rise sharpl) on 

the wall after il leaves the chart tells 
the Philip Morris Inc. executives and 
agency man gathered before it thai the 
firm's new filter-tip baby, Marlboro, is 
a m hopping success. 

"The new Marlboro has enjoyed a 
rate of acceptance faster than that "I 
an] other major cigarette since the in- 
troductJon of Philip Morris ill the mid- 
Thirties," declares George Weissman, 
\.|>. and assistant to the president On 
the hasis of field reports from Bales- 
men, distributors and jobbers, lie sav-. 

the company estimates thai Marlb 

has already grabbed third place behind 
\ iceroy and \\ inston among filter tip 
cigarettes in its distribution area, 
which includes about (>()' \ of the coun- 
ts s population. 

In the fiercely competitive cigarette 
business this is do mean achievement. 
It will be even more remarkable if the 
present company expectations for the 
brand are realized. By the end of this 
year, >av company spokesmen, Marl- 
boro will probably be among the top 
10 of all cigarettes, third in filter vol- 
ume nationally, and Dumber two in the 
firm's ranking of its eight brands, right 
behind Philip Morris. 

Win has Marlboro apparently suc- 
ceeded where similar ventures have 
either failed or barely held their own? 
Essentially, the success is due to the 
winning combination of adroit adver- 
tising, whose main emphasis has been 
on network and spot tv; an intriguing 
new package: and product appeal. 
Most important of all. Marlboro has 
cashed in on the filter-tip trend. 

The rise of Marlboro coincides with 
the sales drop of the Philip Morris 
brand. In 1954, according to Harry 
VA ootten, tobacco industry consultant 
who regular!) estimates the industry's 
sales, Philip Morris output dropped 
17.9 r r from the year before, although 
it still remained number five among 
the big five. This was brought to the 
attention of the advertising industry 



when the in in annour* ed it w as i an- 
celling it- sponsorship "I n - top rated 
show / Li" •■ I tn » aftei five yeai i, 

I he cancellation news sparked 
\ ,ii led intei pretations, some oi w hich 
saw Lucy failing as a sales vehicle. 
I hese comments overlooked the impor- 
tant fact thai Lucy was also carr) ing 
Marlboro commercials. The show w.i- 
thus in the curious position of being a 
-.J.- vehicle for a ii~m- and a declin- 
ing brand al the same time. 

The Philip Morris - Marlboro - Lucy 
triangle demonstrates anew the oft-for- 
gotten truism thai advertising does nol 

work in a vacuum. Profound chat 

are under wa\ in the cigarette busi- 
ness, ami no tv program, however po- 
tent, can he expected b\ itself to hold 
those changes back. 

\ll the leading standard Lengths 
showed output drops between 1953 and 
1954 Camels dropped from 106.8 bil- 
lion to J59.8 billion. Luckj Strike from 
71.0 billion to (>."). 2 billion, Chester- 
field from ST.") billion to 42.0 billion. 
Philip Morris from 30.2 billion to 24.8 
billion, i \\ ootten estimates. I 

Of the leaders, only Pall Mall 
showed a gain, from 50.5 to 54.5 bil- 
lion; the important thing here is that 
the brand is king-size and given a 
filter-type ad treatment. 

For the big swing is on to filtered 
smoking. Wuotten shows filter cigar- 
ettes at over 37 billion for 195 1. 



In . I ' . oi total cigarette volume. I he 
industr) estimates thai filters sh< 
to aboul 20 - "i the total b- 
end "i 1955. In 195 I, filti n nadi 
i. nl i the total. 

I In- Philip Morris sales drop, in 
short, i- not unique, in [at t < hi 
field de lined an even great* i amount, 
some 22.9' I . and th<- Camel I i 9 
ilc rease was nol fai behind the I i 
I. ill oi Philip Morris, 

'I In- i- occuri ing in the fax <• oi an 
industry-wide decline in < igarette con- 
sumption w lii« li amounted to I 
1954 oi ii the prei edi cord 

ing i" W ootten. I li>- unit loss i ame to 
18.2 billion, oul oi a L95 1 total of 
386.8 billion • igarettes manufai tured. 

In a 1 2 Mi\ report to the \--o. i- 
ated robai i o Manufai hirers, in I l"t 
>pi ings, \ a., \\ ootten attributed pari 
of the d« line in unit consumption to 
"adverse publicit) centering around 
the cancel question. I Ither fa< tor- 
cited: i I i increase in teenage and 
over-45 population, who number the 
fewest Bmokers; (2) growing popu- 
larity of king-size « igarettes, whose 
length provides longer smoking time 
per cigarette and thus automatically 
reduces unit consumption. 

"The impact on the industr) to date 

has been to change the complexion of 

the cigarette business rather than the 

volume of smoking -the actual tc- 

i Please turn to page 7 1 1 



COW lit >^ commercial helped make new filter-tip Marlboro ma-- produet Old Marlboro 
had been family packaged product with appeal centered on women in metropolitan markets 




25 JULY 1955 



29 



"^ 



Can commercials entertain and sell 

Nashville agency proved they can on tv with variety of regional brands 



M his is a story about tv commercials 
that didn't try to sell very hard (and, 
as a result, ended up by selling very 
well ) . 

This is a story which shows that "en- 
tertainment" in tv commercials is a 
potent selling force (but does not at- 
tempt to prove it is potent for every- 
body ) . 

This is a story which illustrates that 
advertising sometimes works best when 
it is indefinable (notwithstanding the 
obvious advantages of pre-testing, mar- 
ket surveys and other varieties of fact- 
ual research) . 

This is a story about an agency that 
decided to throw away the book and 
do something different for one regional 
product (but found out it could apply 
the same approach to other types of 
regional products). 

The agency is Noble-Dury & Associ- 
ates of Nashville. The products are 
Frosty Morn, Valleydale and Reelfoot 



Desire to have regional products stand 
out against national brands prompted 
new tv approach by Noble-Dury agency. 
Bill Graham, agency v.p., second from 
left, wrote commercial tunes and copy 

Way in which added impact from suc- 
cessful commercial snowballs is shown 
in bottom photograph. References to 
commercial were made in ads, package 
was redone, tv tune used on radio 




meats (all under the same ownership) ; 
Belle Camp chocolates and Martha 
White flour. The ad technique: ani- 
mation with songs (not jingles) on 
video. 

Here are the highlights of what 
Noble-Dury's foray into the field of 
"entertainment" commercials accomp- 
lished: 

• The first commercial for Frostv 
Morn, aired over WSM-TV, Nashville, 
resulted in a sales increase of 100% 
over a period of six months following 
the commercial's first appearance early 
in 1953. Two years and two commer- 
cials later the sales increase was up 
to 200%. 

• The first use of animated com- 
mercials for Belle Camp chocolates this 
past Valentine's Day upped sales 23 
and 30% in two tv markets where the 
commercials were aired. The firm's 
sales in areas where tv was not used 
"barely got over the hump," in the 
company's own words. 

• Almost (but not quite) as exciting 
to the agency as the zoom in sales was 
popularity of the commercials among 
viewers. WSM-TV reported, follow- 
ing the debut of the Frosty Morn com- 
mercial, that its switchboard was 
flooded with calls from people asking 
when the commercial would be shown 
again. With no push from the agency, 
dance bands began playing the Frosty- 
Morn tune in the Nashville area. The 
interest in the Valleydale song reached 
such a pitch that the agency recorded 
it for sale at a self-liquidating price 
(10c) . Up to now 12,000 persons have 
paid to buy a tv commercial song. 

To Noble-Dury this combination of 
sales-plus-artistic success is the vindi- 
cation of an idea that makes some 
admen shudder. In the words of Bill 
Graham, Noble-Dury vice president 
and account executive for its meat 
products (and the man who wrote and 
composed most of the commercials 
mentioned) the idea was, in effect, to 
walk in to a client and say : 

"Look, Mister — we want to spend 
lots of your money. But we don't want 



to put the emphasis on selling your 
product. Mostly we want to entertain 
the public . . . and somewhere along 
I he way we'll mention that your prod- 
uct is mighty good." 

This doesn't mean that Noble-Dury 
tried something that had never been 
tried before. It does mean that Noble- 
Dury tried something it had never 
tried before and showed a strain of 
courage which points up again the 
importance of creative advertising. 

In getting away from specific sales 
points and latching on to the more 
vague and emotional aspects of selling, 
Noble-Dury was not proving that one 
method is better than the other (nor 
does the agency say that it did). What 
it did prove to its own satisfaction is 
that there are two opposite poles of 
effective advertising and that the less 
conventional approach can offer results 
just as solid as hard-sell. 

This bi-polar concept of advertising 
was expressed recently by Horace 
Schwerin, head of Schwerin Research 
Corp., during a speech at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan. 

Schwerin said his firm's recent re- 
search gave proof of something 
"creative people have long hoped was 
true: Remembrance of copy points is 
not the whole answer to commercial 
effectiveness. . . . There is another 
area besides convincing demonstration, 
an area which might be called mood or 
fantasy. ... A commercial of this 
nature establishes its own world, with- 
in which viewers accept actions and 
breathe in impressions that they would 
reject if the mood of the commercial 
were logical rather than emotive. We 
have tested commercials of this type 
that have proved extraordinarily effec- 
tive in swaying viewers toward the 
brand advertised ; and we are receiving 
more and more commercials of this 
ty pe to study from advertisers who see 
which way the wind is blowing. 

"I like to call what I have been 
outlining here "TV's Law of Extremes." 
By this I mean that, in examining the 
(Please turn to page 78) 

SPONSOR 



ifsF a piggies ambition •■ from the day he is born 



IS HOPE HE LL BE GOOD ENOUGH 



TO BC A FROSTY >■• 




Is hope that he will be 



To be a 



Fan mail from viewers (»<■<• letten below) to advertisers, sold .it self-liquidating prio (10 cents). First Frost) Mora 

i\ stations, followed .11 n n^ of Noble-Durj commercials, -i h li .i- one commercial resulted in fl I "t i .ill- to WSM>TV, Nashville. B 

alwve. One of the commercials proved so populai n was recorded, in Nashville area j >l i \ ••■ I lune without prompting fi 



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MOST OF SIX WEEKLY B&M ONE-MINUTE COMMERCIALS NOW RUN IN MORNING SHOW ON WBAY-TV CALLED "PARTY LINE" 



In 2.m/i week of 26-week tv test: 



B&M results show tv is stronger 
sales spur than price cut 



Sales total for first half of July is greatest yet, topping 3,000 dozen cans 




MMe^pile the fact that this year Burn- 
ham & Morrill allowed no promotion 
allowance on its oven-baked beans in 
Green Bay. W is., as compared with last 
year's 500 per case deduction from 
mid-June through mid-July, sales in 
early summer continue spurting ahead. 
These are the campaign highlights in 
television weeks 24 and 25 (first half 
of July I. 

1. CURRENT SALES: Last year on 
every purchase of a case of 27-oz. B&M 
beans, grocers got a 50£ deduction to 



encourage them to push and promote 
the product in warm-weather months — 
best sales period for beans. This is a 
substantial saving for grocers since the 
case price is about $3.40. But this year 
B&M elected to make no such reduc- 
tion, preferring to see how well the 
product did with its television cam- 
paign as the only impetus to increased 
sales. 

The results during the first half of 
July are spectacular in terms of the 
number of dozens of cans of B&M 
products sold — 3.009 this year com- 

SP0NS0R 



pared with 1,518 dozen last year in t h«- 
same period. \\ bile the percent m- 
crease 98 i- not high < ompared 
h iili othei pei iods this year in w bi< li 
percentage :,nn- have exceeded 100 
the total "i 1,009 i ana probabl) i ••[ > i «• 
-<ni ~ i h< - largest half-month sales in 
the area in IUWI histoi j . 

rhe fact thai last year's first-hall 
Jul) Bales were definitel) inflated bj 
the 504 pei '.i-'- deduction in price is 
indicated l>\ what happened to ll\\l 
Bales during the s» ond hall ni Jul) 
last year. ITiej pra< ii' .ills liit zero, 
showing thai grocers had purposelj 
Btocked up t" • over future needs rather 
than because ol current sales expec- 
tancy, fnus it's apparent that with- 
out the allowance, sales l"i the li r>t 

1. ill "I Jul) 1954 would have been sub- 
stantiall) lower than 1,518 dozen. 
I hat tlii- i- the case is further docu- 
mented b) the fact that it's the 27-oz. 
size of bean (on which the allowance 
was granted) which accounts toi most 
ol tlic 1,518 (In/en cans sold isee 
chart i. In other periods last year it 
was tlic 18-oz. bean which was the l>L r 
seller. 

2. TOTAL SALES: For the entire 
25-week | >«• i i « >» 1 of television advertis- 
ing, B&M Bales arc ahead O.'V ; . based 
on tabulations t < » date, i It i- believed, 
however, that when rapid tabulations 
made to meet sponsor's deadlines are 
rechecked at the conclusion of the tesl 
more complete figures will show an 
even greater increase.) 

The sales after 25 week- of televi- 
sion in IT).! total 1').,",;;.'. do/en can-. 

Tor the comparable period in 1954, 

the total is 10,318 dozen. This in- 
cludes three products, the 18-oz. bean; 
the 27-oz. bean: and BXM brown 
bread. 

These products received no national 
advertising support in the Green Ba) 
area last scar. The present tesl is 
therefore ideall) suited to measuring 
television impact. It's virtually a labo- 
ratory situation with the onl\ new mar- 
keting factor introduced into the area 
being the 20-week television effort. 
And to add to the clean-cut nature of 
the test, no merchandising or point-of- 
sale activity of am organized nature 
has been introduced. 

The station used is WBAY-TV, 
ii Bay, a Channel 2 CBS TV affili- 
ate. The announcements for B&M have 
been placed in a variety of davtime 
slots, including a children's show and 
more recentl) a telephone show in 

25 JULY 1955 



morning hours < ailed I'm m Line 

picture) . 

H m I I II lil PI UMS: The televi 
Bion tesl ua- scheduled to end on 22 
Jul) . sponsor's next issui 8 Au ust I 
h ill carr) results i"i the fin d week "I 
the test plus a rex ap "I the entire prog- 
ress "I the i ampaign. H\ \1 has not 
made a final dc i-ion on it- fiituic tele- 
vision plan- in the Green Ba) area and 
elsewhere. But ii is seriousl) consider- 
ing entr) into television dining the 
coming \ eai in a number ol markets. 
Sales of B&M products in the < Ireen 
Ba) area w ill be watched i losel) im- 
mediatel) following the last week "I 
telei i-ion tn see w hether there is a 
carry-ovej effect from the campaign. 
\ researi h firm, in fact, has i ome for- 
ward with a suggestion for a follow-up 
stud) in determine whether customers 
will continue to repeat -ale- of the 
product, among other fa< tors. \n<l in 
a future issue -nine tune this fall SPON- 
SOR will report on what happened to 

sales alter television campaigning 
came to a halt. 

Wholesalers in the Green Ba\ area 



were quel ied as to h hat th<-s tho 
WOuId happen In the |{\\1 sales ■ 

aftei the 22 luK i lose •'! the t\ i 
paign. Most of tho* ted fell 

there w mild be < ontinued -ti 
dining warm weathei months with a 
drop-ofl in fall < ompared m iili noi 
1) highei sumn • \ll w i 

-.dei - i niii.n ted fell that the big r ise 
in l!\\l sales during the past 
months w ill hai e a health) eff« i on 
the product next fall even without ad- 
vertising. But most fell the comp 
would be making a mistake if ii did 
imt continue aome advertising aftei 
the build-up of the pasl -i\ months. 
\ new agenc) w ill take ovei the 
• ount effe< tive I Septerabei \i spon- 
sor - presstime, ( !hai les S. Moi i ill. 
I!,\\l president, announ ed appoint 
rnenl "I the John C. Dowd agen< ies, 
Boston and New i "r k. replai 
I'.l'.Di >. Boston. John Dowd told spon- 
sor: "\\ e are stud) ing results ol the 
B&M t « — t as ie« Hided in sponsor i are- 
fully." No basic change in thinking 
underlies the agenc) shift, sponsor be- 
lieves, and new plans will nol be Bel 
foi several weeks. * * • 



B&M SALES FIRST HALF OF JULY 1954 vs. L955 



Sales by dOKni >t B&M beans and 
brown bread at nlmlesale levelt 



1954 vs. 1955 



27 m. brran bread 

1954 vs 1955 1954 vs. 1955 



AREA A (50-mile railiu- 


of Gre«-n 


llav) 










/. MANITOWOC, WIS. 


20 


70 


70 


25 








2. OSHKOSH, WIS. 





150 





69 





30 


3. APPLETON, ins. 


100 


350 


300 


210 





60 


4. G1LLETT, WIS. 





110 





75 








S. GREEh BAY, WIS. 


120 


500 


130 


450 





110 


6. MENOMINEE, MICH. 


50 


50 















TOTALS A 



290 1.230 



S00 829 



200 



AREA B (50-100 mile radius of Green Bay) 

7. FOND Dl LAC, WIS. 

8. STEl ENS POINT, WIS. 

9. WAX SAV, WIS. 

10. NORWAY, MICH. 

11. SHEBOYGAN, iris. 

12. WISt ONSIN RAPIDS, WIS. 






50 


50 


50 





80 


15 


1 35 


20 


100 


10 


62 


100 





350 





50 


120 


98 


90 


20 


30 


15 


3 



n 

















6 








30 


n 






TOTALS B 


190 380 


538 340 
H 1.169 


30 


TOTALS A & B 


480 1.610 


230 



Grand total first half July 1954: 1.518 DOZEN < W> 
Grand total first half July 1955: 3.009 DOZEN < AIMS 

tTtlcvlslon campaign began 21 January 1955 



33 



Radio helps 

make Boston top 

lash territory 



45 New England Nash dealers up 
sales with $43,000 am sportseast 




WBZ sport ".faster Egan I r. ) presents 1951 Nash and trophy to Red 
Sox' Jackie Jensen. Egan draws sports fans, appeal- to women hy in- 
terviewing sport personalities like Jensen about home life, hobbies 



M he New England zone was a good 
one for Nash sales, but it w T as never 
outstanding — until several years ago. 
that is. In 1953 the Greater Boston 
dealers suddenly forged ahead into 
Number One place among all Nash 
zones in the country and they've stayed 
there ever since. Their share of total 
U. S. Nash sales rose from the average 
5% in 1952, to 6% in 1953, 8% in 
1954— a 60 % leap that still has Nash 
sales strategists scratching their heads. 

Part of the secret behind this New 
England sales record is the group 
spirit of the Greater Boston Nash Deal- 
ers Association, a spirit characterized 
by a cooperative radio advertising ef- 
fort which the group undertook in 
1953 (through Henry M. Frost Co- 
Boston ) . Their combined budget 
I $43,000 a year ) pays for their year- 
'round nightly sponsorship of All 
About Sports, WBZ, at a minimal cost 
to each individual dealer. 

Aim of the program is twofold: 

1. To build traffic and sales. 

2. To make the Nash dealers better 
known and build confidence. 

They feel that the) have achieved 
both aims with Leo Egan's All About 



34 



Sports, for only $43,000. Nationally 
Nash has dropped from No. 10 to No. 
13 among all makes of cars in total 
sales, but the New England dealers 
stayed in ninth place for 1954-5, out- 
selling the other independents. 

Furthermore, the entire New Eng- 
land sales territory showed increased 
sales as a result of the sports show. 
Dealers outside of Boston area began 
to contribute toward the $43,000 an- 
nual budget, and todav some 45 New 
England Nash dealers share in All 
About Sports. 

Before the Nash dealers began spon- 



soring this program, they gave Egan a 
new Nash Ambassador and stipulated 
that he deliver commercials himself. 

"I don't think anyone realized then 
just how wise a move that was," says 
Bert Tracy, New England zone man- 
ager for Nash. "Leo Egan has proved 
a remarkable salesman for Nash, and 
the cooperation we have received from 
the station has been wonderful. 

''In 1953. we pushed to the top of 

the Nash sales ladder for the first time 

— and staved there. Our share of the 

Nash registrations, which had been a 

l Please turn to page 82 I 



WBZ and dealers cooperate on promoting show. Station provides banners for show- 
rooms (left* promoting program. Egan. Bert Tracy < left I watch 1953 trophy winner Piersall 
try Nash Rambler. Station hires models irishti as cigarette girls for Nash dealer meeting- 




SPONSOR 



TIMEBUYERS OF THE U. S. 

f #*/#>#/ bu #•#//#**. much #•##>.* a sal their accounts 

lining ilif past several years the number oi men and women engaged in timebuying has 
,a-il\ increased. \i some ad agencies timebuying personnel has doubled and tripled overnight 
furthermore, timebuying personnel is known l<>i frequent -liiti-. The confusion in who handles what 
iccount, in who lias moved, in who is new is one oi the problems oi a problem-beset industry. 
Some station representatives have worked hard to maintain thorough up-to-date lists oi tiniebuyers. 
Recent!) one such list, prepared li\ John E. Pearson Co., was generousl) made available t<> sponsoh 

eaders. The li-i is being published in three parts. The first part, containing listings for most New 
York agencies, appeared in the I 1 July Fall Fad- Basics issue. This issue the remaindei oi tin- 
New York li-t appears as well as other East Coast cities; Chicago; othei Midwestern cities. 
I i-iing- for Southern cities and the Wesl ( !<»a-t will appeal next issue (8 Vugust). 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS & PHONE TIMEBUYERS 



NEW YORK. 



imirit /ruwi II Jul\ U 

x II W SB & I5KVITV 

1« F.ati 57th Si., PI 1-1557 

i.l OKI. I- 

Re.de. ', Digest J'.Vm rf 

\l EXANDEB 

WW MOM) SPECTOR CO. 

t-tr, I'.irk <ir. <22>. Ml H-IHIT 

IHR. R \l)lo l \ RK H \R1> W UNi 



«»""«,. ^r 



STORM & KLEIN 

M u ,-<i tsth Si. <:tt>>, (I t>-irmt 

1 ARTIIl'R 

J M Mil I lit 

STREET * FINNEY 

■ ii , ii i;ih S». (36), I I <>■! TOO 

V.P fc RADIO riMEBUYER Hllt\ rHOMAS 
Ml RK TARY TO HELEN THOMAS - JEAN AYRES 

( ardui j 
Doans Pills y m , KN 
Florieni Deodorant | l mom \- 

K.m-Kil I 

ns< |{ 

177 WaJUon Int., Ml H-ldOO 

C»rt<r I'tniluil.. Inr. 

Arrid - I". S. (Regular St Chlorophyll) 1 j,. vN 

Arrid - Canada (Regular .<. Spraj j < VKROLL 

Rise - U. S. ") 
Rim- ( anada < !m si kkn 
Bingo - U. S 

Bc«t Foods 

Presto "I 
HO Quick Oats , J A ^ 1N(> 
HO Cream Farina J 

Lever R - - 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS* PHONE TIMEBUYERS 



Lifebuov I JKAH 

I 1RRI 



SUvet D 



j vi k 

c \N\IM. 



W MIHI 
HOVt E 



1 



Nii\/i-ma Ch 



ln-mii.il / j£AN 
Simonu f CARRi 



Smith Brothers 

Whitehall Pharmacol (BiSoDol- 

Regular Mints, ( hlorophyll Minis. 

Powder; Infra Rub) { 

Mi--. Filbert's (margarine, mayonnaise, 

salad dressing) 



-It \ t -I lit \ 



( lark ( .miK \ j^ck 

Bllll- (li.ll l I WMM. 



J. WALTER THOMPSON CO. 

t20 Lrxinglon Awm. (17). M( 8-2000 

111 \1> riMEBUYER 1 \MI s <> I l ( I 



M vitln 
Atlantis Sales KIH( „ M< 

ALICE VUH.r 



BriU0 ^M?S 



Champion 
Purolator Products 



1 ..i,l D. all i \d\ . 



i M \KI(» 

\ KlHi lit It 



I t II V\ 
i HIMENI 
i I l\ I 
P4I K\RII 
PAUI 

not i.l v- 
SI i. oi i • i - 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. A0DRESS i PHONE TIMEBUYERS 



lur.l MolOI ( mlr.ll tunc! I ' ' ' ' VN 



- 



Oil \ 



I B Williams \ 



jot MIHkHI 
VI I t N >UK- 



UUN - VI k- 



III \n I [Ml BUYER I \i \1 M SH tNNON 

K " K IIO lit K 

Mi ntholatum I 

I I II VNk 
Scon Papt i ( MAKSHAIJ 

jot IIMtktK 

lotana ManvUle ,,,„ ,,, , NN 
lit u t \ > v 1 1- 



Diiniij ; AI |, f » ,,i , 



Pan America 



1 



HIM I.l V NN 
lll»H ^ V II - 



Standard Brands J, 1 ,, 1 ." VK ^, F ' < 



i i I 

u i N ^«^ surra 

III \l> l IMI III -i l R \\\l < u R.IGH I 



n»ighi j 



Aluminium Ltd. ] 

Bli 
Church 8c 

Irving TniM / M lKI( , 

j him lit K 

■— b «- I^aSssJu 

NANCYSHtra 

Pharmacraft ) MARIO 
Pond', Extract I*,'™,,,, 

' nd - rSm " h 'i'uimiv.I 

ESJ£S 

N \ ( .inr.) UXBHSAOKS 



25 JULY 1955 



35 






JOSEPH E. 
KNAP, JR. 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS &. PHONE TIMEBUYERS 

WILLIAM H. WEINTRAUB & CO. 

(ii. ....... NORMAN, CRAIG a: KUMMEL, INC. as of 

7 Jul* 1955, after SPONSOR*! preutlme for the Fall 

I ... i i -... » 

408 Madison Ave. (22), PL 1-0900 

BlatzBeerl ,„ 
Kalser-Frazei V DOWLING 

Revlon J JULIA ii < \-~ 

WESLEY ASSOCIATES 

24,7 Park Ave., EL 5-2680 

Shulton, Inc. (Old Spice) 

YOUNG & RUBICAM, INC. 

285 Madison Ave. (17), ML'. 9-5000 

V.P. AND DIRECTOR OF MEDIA- 
PETER G. LEVATHES 

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT- 
WILLIAM E. MATTHEWS 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR-FRANK COULTER 
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR-THOMAS M. HACKETT 
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR-CHARLES T. SKELTON 
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR-HENRY L. SPARKS 
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR-SAMUEL THURM 

(AH Borden; -, RUSSELL 
Institutional; Cheese Division) YOUNG 
Duffy Mott (Apple Products; Sunsweet f Adelaide 
Prune Juice; Clapps Baby Food) Hatton* 



Borden (Starlac, Evaporated Milk; ) 
Instant Hot Chocolate; Eagle Brand) f 

Bristol-Myers (Sal Hepatica; Bufferin; 
Vitalis Hair Cream) 



Drackett (Drano; Windex) 



Ford Motors (Continental 



Div.) j. 



KIRK 
GREINER 

Joseph 

O'Brien* 

MARTIN 
MURPHY 

Sy Drantch* 

WILLIAM 
DOLLARD 

Thomas 

Comerford* 

EDWIN BYRNE 
Robert 
Kowalski* 



General Cigar (White Owl Cigars; Wm. 

Penn, Robert Burns Cigars & L 
Cigarillos; Van Dyke) | 

j 
General Foods 



All Products; Corporate "1 

D-Zerta I 

Jell-O J 

Baker Coconut ~| 

Birds Eye Div. J. 

(Jack & Jill Cat Food) J 

Calumet Baking Powder ' 

Certo & Sure Jell 

Kernel Nuts 

Log Cabin 

Maple Del 

Sanka 



VANCE LYNCH 

Arthur 

Meagher* 
VANCE HICKS 

Marie 

Fitzpatrick* 



JOSEPH 

LINCOLN 
Emma 
Whitney* 

KAY BROWN 
Ann Purtill* 



LORRAINE 

m i, i. into 

Edith 
Johnson* 



Swans Down Cake Flour 
Baker Chocola 



BYRNE 



ir ) EDWIN BYR 
te ? Robert 
J Kowalski* 



, WARREN 

Swans Down Mixes I BA.HR 

Postum ( George 

MacDowell* 



La France & Satina ) 
Minute Products j 



A. B. PRATT 
Mary King* 



Goodyear Tire & Rubber ] 
(Goodyear Tires; Lifeguard I DESMOND 



Tubes; Institutional) I 



iulf Oil J. 



*Assistnnt 



O'NEILL 

FRANK 
GRADY 

Wayne 
Stoops* 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS & PHONE TIMEBUYERS 



International Silver "I GEORGE 
(1847 Rogers Bros.; International j. HOFFMAN 
Sterling; Stainless by International) 



JohlUO 



Hurley' 

kIKK 



n & Johnson (baby products; ) grei.N'ER 
Surgical Dressings Div.) j Joseph 

' O'Brien* 

Life Savers \ 



FREDERICK 
WEISS 

Bertrand 

Hopt* 



Lipton Tea & Soups ( I H ? MA ^ 

' COMERFORD 



Lorillard (Kent C 



ig) | 



JOHN 

HENDERSON 
Martin 

J I ii k .i -I. ..k ' 

JOHN 



Metropolitan Life Ins. f FLOURNOY' 
Simmons | Bette Rut 



ARTHUR 



National Sugar Refining I JONES 

(Jack Frost; Arbuckle Sugars) | Kenneth 

I Phelps* 



Procter & Gamble (Cheer) 



LLOYD 

HARRIS 

FLORENCE 

DART 

WILLIAM 

WALKER 
Catherine 
Brostrom* 



WARREN 

Remington Shaver i BAHR 

'. George 

J MacDowell* 

Singer Sewing Machine \ A - B. PRATT 
. Mary King* 



Time (Life Magazine; Time Inc.; 

Sports Illustrated Magazine 

Time Magazine) 



MARTIN- 
MURPHY 

George 

Bailey* 
GEORGE 
. HOFFMAN 

Genevieve 

Hurlev* 
WARREN 
BAHR 

George 

MacDowell* 



BOSTON. MASS. 



ALLIED ADV. AGENCY 

lOO Boylston St., Hubbard 2-410O 



Beacon Co. (Floor Wax) \ ™*£™, 



ARNOLD & CO. 

262 Washington St., Richmond 2-1220 



Old Monastery 



Wines C 



ARNOLD Z. 
ROSOFF 



HAROLD CABOT & CO. 

136 Federal St., Hancock 6-7600 

H. P. Hood & Sons (Dairy Prods.) "I 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph I ^ A LL " AMS 
S. S. Pierce (Food Prods.) J 

CHAMBERS & WISWELL 

250 Park Square Bldg., Liberty 2-7565 

Habitant Soup j HELEN^ 



AGENCY, ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS & PHONE TIMEBUYERS 

JAMES THOMAS CHIRURG CO. 

Alt Park Square Bldg., Hancock 6-7310 

MEDIA DIR.-HERMAN A. BRAUMULI.hR, JR. 

1 HERMAN A. 
International Shoe (Sundial) j. BRAUMULLER 
\ JR. 

JOHN DOWD CO. 

212 Park Square Bldg., Hubbard 2-8050 

MEDIA DIRECTOR -WM. H. MONAGHAN 

Cott Beverages 1 

Megowen Educator Food l * M - H - 

,.. ■ t ..r t MONAGHAN 
Waltham Watch J 

INGALLS-MINITER CO. 

137 Sexcbury St., Commonwealth 6-5767 

Moxie Co. "1 
Friend Bros. (Beans) \ g£*£ 
Tabby Cat Food J 

HERMON W. STEVENS AGENCY 

9 Neicbury St., Copley 7-2757 

MEDIA DIRECTOR -S. J. CRUPI 



Father John's Med 
Salada 



icine 1 
Tca | S. J. CRL-I 



BALTIMORE. MD. 



CAHN-MILLER 

1 £. 24th St., Belmont 5-2520 

W. B. DONER & CO. 

225 «. Fayette St., Mulberry 5-1 800 



National Bohemian J. p^p RT 



JOSEPH KATZ CO. 

10 W. Chase St., Lexington 9-1500 

ADV. & SALES PROM. MGR.-GEORGE M. GLAZIER 
SPACE & TIME BUYER - JEAN MITCHELL 



~., ■. GEORCE H. 

American Oil ) GLAZIER 

Maryland Pharmacal (Rem & Rel) \ JEAN 

' MITCHELL 



KAUFMAN-STROUSE, INC. 

130 W. Hamilton St., Saratoga 7-2414 

KUFF & FELDSTEIN 

233 E. 25th St., TV 9-1485 

S. A. LEVYNE CO. 

343 St. Paul Place, Mulberry 5-3390 

Baltimore Paint & Color "I 

Cat's Paw L JUNE 
Recipe Foods/ ENGELDORF 

EDWARD PRAGER ADV. AGENCY 

lOOl .V. Calvert St., Vernon 7-2525 

Webster Clothing (Brooks Clothes) \ ^{V'en 

VANSANT, DUGDALE & CO. 

15 E. Fayette St., Lexington 9-5400 

Crosse & Blackwell "1 ROBERT V. 
Fram I WALSH 
r c o , r- I EVELYN K. 

F. S. Royster Guano J hUtt.MAN 



PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



ADRIAN BAUER ADV. AGENCY 

1528 Walnut St.. Kingsley 5-7870 

Blue Magic ) DAV1D 
(Easy Monday Liquid Starch) j KAIGLER 

AITKIN-KYNETT CO. 

1400 S. Penn Sq., Riltenhouse 6-7810 



36 



SPONSOR 



_ 



IAGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRE&S A PHONE 


TIMEBUYERS 


1IIMIT, I'KISION, 


( RAPIN, 


LAMB 


f KEEN 






im> v,, / ir/i Si., / ... Ml 


1/ mo 




U II. ,111 N s,„n B 


■Oil Tea) t 

J 


■Ol i 

i in n 1 1 \ 



V \\. IYER A ->ON 

U U .i./ii.. K l..,i ••,,. I., ial.ar.1 I-4IIIHI 

Si » ^ . .i k lisl ..I timebuyen In II Jul* tame i"i 
fanes ni \ u niR timebuyen 

W VI IKK F. RF.W1 T ft CO. 

; ».< . /... „,r Si . Ktmg$li , . i.7->H 

Baltimore Gospel rabernacle ) nun 



made / , „, ,, 
Bible Stud] ii.Mir [ mi Ni hi 



JAMES THOMAS CHIRI H<; CO. 

1500 » aim,, M. H/./e , /ViiM»;.,i. «.,r .!-'>.-. I.I 

MEDIA KIK 1IIKM \\ \. MK \ t Ml I I I K IK 



ECOFF & JAMES 

121 •>,. iir„ a .i m.. m — nj-y imftir 5>I459 

Ceorge I) W.ilunll & Co. 
(Interior and exterior house pai 



fc Co. ) 
inis) | 



IHIN It V I II t 



GEARE-MARSTON \DV. 

22 and I ... utl S»,., /,.,„.( I-I>.".:ll) 



Pennsylvania Salt J. • , ' RA >'K C. 

mi Rpm 



(.11 O * ROGERS U>V. 

|J >u. 12th St- Halnul 2-IHOII 



Diamond stale relephone ) waiter m 

(Bell Telephone) f F.RICKSON 



PHILIP KLEIN ADV. 

( nii.-r.ii, HI. I-.. it>th * Locum Sit., 

Penny-packer 5-7696 



Paper Mate J. HERBERT 

I KIM. Ml II 



AL PAI L LEFTON CO. 

1617 (Vmi.Wi.iin,! Bird., Riltenhouse 6-1500 



Cencral Baking (Becker's Bread) ) ALEX 
Signet Club Plan 



) ALEX 

( i;rikh\ 



LEWIS & GILMAN 

152/1 ttalnul St.. P,nn> packer 5-9900 

Wyetb laboratories (Vi-Cillin) } PKTER 

Fleer's Bubble Cum £ KONDRA9 

W. WALLACE ORR 

1514 Wrnbuu St, KtugUmj 6-4140 

TOWN ADV. AGENCY 

1420 » .i/n«f >'(.. Ktngataj t-trio 



Fels & Co. ) MARY 
(Instant Fels Naptha) j DUNLAVEY 



WILKES-BARRE. PA. 



Li WFIELDHOl'SE ADV. 

15 So. Franklin St.. W ilkes-Barre. Pa.. Valley 2-7182 



Wist Potato Chip 



1 



( Mel 
J JR. 



el VI (.III IN. 



AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADDRESS A PHONE TIMEBUYERS AGENCY. ACCOUNTS. ADO RES8 A PHONE TIMEBUYERS 



CHICAGO. ILL. 



\l BRJ Y, I l\l »Y, M Mil El A HODGSON 

-■'" > >f.. /.,.... I,. . / ,. >,„„, / ,, /,,««> 



Doublet 

Williamson I tndi '•' Nl 

I II.IMIII I 



luii i national II u \r>trr 



I'.I'.IM. 

919 \ UUklmmm